Effect of Aquatic Environment on Fish Ecology II

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water, Agriculture and Aquaculture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2024 | Viewed by 3650

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
College of Fisheries, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
Interests: fish ecophysiology; environmental stress; fish growth; freshwater aquaculture; fish ecology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fish living in water exhibit magnificent life legends on the blue planet. Aquatic environments in oceans, rivers, lakes, and ponds provide the conditions for fish survival, growth, and reproduction. Natural events and anthropogenic activities, such as climate change, water construction projects, and water pollution, are changing the aquatic environment, and fish must adapt to this changing environment. Alterations in the early life history, growth, and reproduction strategies, the population size, community structure, and function, and other fish-related ecological issues, have occurred in fish in the recent decades.

Scientists are trying to elucidate the mechanism of the ecological adaptation of fish to the aquatic environment. Modern techniques and methods have been developed to study how fish interact with their environment in a wide range of aquatic habitats and artificial water bodies. Fish can modify their organs’ structure and functions in response to the water’s physicochemical environment, change their reproduction strategy for population sustainability, and adjust their behavior and growth patterns in response to environmental change. However, if the environment changes are beyond the physiological tolerance of the fish, they cannot re-establish homeostasis, which eventually causes fish death, thus altering the aquatic community structure and affecting fish farming.

With this Special Issue of Water, we offer a platform for the publication of innovative and original articles and reviews regarding the effect of the aquatic environment on fish ecology. The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to the following: the effect of different environmental factors on fish development, growth, and reproduction; studies modeling environmental impacts on fish population and culture; the responses of fish to water pollution; the mechanisms of fish adaptation to environmental stress; and the ecological changes in fish that are cultured in freshwater and seawater. By quantifying and describing the functional relationships between fish and the aquatic environment, this will lead to better management of fish farming and better conservation strategies for fish species, populations, and communities, thus leading to a more sustainable aquatic food supply.

Prof. Dr. Dapeng Li
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • fish ecology
  • fish growth
  • physiological ecology
  • fish behavior
  • water pollution
  • ocean acidification
  • eutrophication
  • environmental stress
  • population dynamics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 8929 KiB  
Article
Age, Growth and Reproduction of Schizothorax pseudaksaiensis of the Turks River
by Chengxin Wang, Na Yao, Liwei Xia, Xinyue Wang, Yong Song, Gulden Serekbol, Fangze Zi, Xuyuan Lin, Jin Yan and Shengao Chen
Water 2023, 15(23), 4044; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15234044 - 22 Nov 2023
Viewed by 827
Abstract
The age, growth, and reproduction of Schizothorax pseudaksaiensis (Herzenstein, 1889), a second-level key protected aquatic species in Xinjiang, were studied using fish ecology methods, and the biological characteristics of its population are discussed. A total of 735 specimens were collected on a seasonal [...] Read more.
The age, growth, and reproduction of Schizothorax pseudaksaiensis (Herzenstein, 1889), a second-level key protected aquatic species in Xinjiang, were studied using fish ecology methods, and the biological characteristics of its population are discussed. A total of 735 specimens were collected on a seasonal basis from 2021 to 2022 using cages and nets in the Turks River. The fish length ranged from 47.30 mm to 538.60 mm, and the minimum age and maximum age were 1 years old and 23 years old, respectively. The fitting correlations revealed that S. pseudaksaiensis is a uniformly growing fish. The ages at the inflection point for S. pseudaksaiensis were 22.28 (female) and 19.55 (male). The sex ratio was 0.89 (females):1 (males), and the spawning period occurred from April to July. The absolute fecundity was 55,652.01 ± 25,468.78 eggs per individual, and the relative fecundity was 25.92 ± 10.69 eggs per gram. This study provides life history trait data for S. pseudaksaiensis and has theoretical and practical importance for maintaining population dynamics and fishery ecological balance. Additionally, a basis for the protection of fishery germplasm plateau resources is provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Aquatic Environment on Fish Ecology II)
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15 pages, 4057 KiB  
Article
Age and Growth of Hedinichthys yarkandensis (Day, 1877) in the Hotan River
by Xin-Yue Wang, Sheng-Ao Chen, Yong Song, Cheng-Xin Wang and Fei Liu
Water 2023, 15(16), 2948; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15162948 - 16 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1082
Abstract
Hedinichthys yarkandensis (Day, 1877) has been highlighted in research and evaluated as a class II key protected aquatic wildlife in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. To enhance the study of fish resources in the Hotan River, further germplasm conservation of fishery resources specific to the [...] Read more.
Hedinichthys yarkandensis (Day, 1877) has been highlighted in research and evaluated as a class II key protected aquatic wildlife in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. To enhance the study of fish resources in the Hotan River, further germplasm conservation of fishery resources specific to the Tarim River Basin should be carried out, and the development of the aquatic seed industry should be promoted. A total of 1275 H. yarkandensis individuals were collected from 2020–2021. Fish ecological methods were used to explore the population ecological characteristics and ecological habits of H. yarkandensis. We found that the age of H. yarkandensis ranged from one to seven based on lapillus otoliths, and two-plus individuals accounted for more. The age structure composition reveals stable genetic performance and good population fecundity. The fitting correlations of standard length and body weight reveal that H. yarkandensis in the Hotan River is a uniformly growing fish. The ratio of females to males is 0.87:1. The Fulton condition index of males was slightly higher than that of females due to individual miniaturization. The comparative study found that the growth parameters of the Hotan River population (L = 302.772, W = 310.8450, t0 = −0.4608) were higher than those of the other groups. The feeding demand of H. yarkandensis in the Hotan River was guaranteed because the effect of human activities was small in the watershed area and the watershed ecosystem was more stable, which resulted in stable germplasm resources in the Hotan River population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Aquatic Environment on Fish Ecology II)
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12 pages, 1773 KiB  
Article
Acute Thermal Stress Reduces Skeletal Muscle Growth and Quality in Gibel Carp (Carassius gibelio)
by Qixin Hu, Jiamin Lu, Yu Yang, Dapeng Li and Jieya Liu
Water 2023, 15(15), 2706; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15152706 - 27 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1085
Abstract
An acute elevation in temperature impacts fish physiology and in turn causes an alteration in growth performance. This study investigated the effect of acute thermal stress on skeletal muscle growth and quality in gibel carp (Carassius gibelio). The gibel carp were [...] Read more.
An acute elevation in temperature impacts fish physiology and in turn causes an alteration in growth performance. This study investigated the effect of acute thermal stress on skeletal muscle growth and quality in gibel carp (Carassius gibelio). The gibel carp were randomly assigned to three temperature treatments, 20 °C, 26 °C, and 32 °C, for 168 h. The muscular quality characteristics and the expressions of the genes related to muscle growth were assessed at 0 h, 1 h, 12 h, 24 h, 72 h, and 168 h. The muscle nutrient content was significantly higher in the 20 °C treatment, and the muscle was more tender and elastic. The gene expression levels of the MRFs family were significantly upregulated and then gradually decreased after 1 h. The expression level of MSTN-2 was increased in the 32 °C treatment at 168 h, in support of the slow growth rate under acute thermal stress. It is implied that gibel carp could adapt to acute thermal stress to a certain extent. Acute thermal stress, however, eventually led to a decrease in muscle growth rate and quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Aquatic Environment on Fish Ecology II)
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