Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Soil and Water Environment

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Water".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 586

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
LEAF, School of Agriculture, University of Lisbon, 1649-004 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: soil pollution; trace elements; soil quality assessment; organic wastes valorization; soil amendments; phytoremediation
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Guest Editor
Institute of Earth Sciences (ICT-Evora)/Polytechnic Institute of Beja, 7800-295 Beja, Portugal
Interests: environmental risk assessment; water quality; ecotoxicology bioassays; pesticides
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ordinarily, concerns about the impacts of chemicals on soil and water have focused on traditional chemicals such as nutrients, heavy metals, pesticides, and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). More recently, however, there has been an increasing concern about other chemicals, so-called contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), for which much additional research needs to be conducted regarding relevant analytics, environmental concentrations, legislation, and (eco)toxicological effects. Even the definition of CECs has yet reach a consensus, but the term is usually used to refer to human and veterinary pharmaceuticals, nanomaterials, personal care products, hormones, and a wide range of industrial xenobiotics such as flame retardants and plasticizers. Ever greater amounts of CECs will be released into the environment in the future, and industrial R&D is far ahead of regulators and academia in this matter. It is very important that the science remain up-to-date, investigating this topic, helping regulators to protect the environment from potential problems associated with the presence of CECs.

This Special Issue welcomes studies on the presence of CECs in the different environments (e.g., soil, surface waters, sediments, groundwaters, drinking waters), from monitoring, degradation, and persistence studies to (eco)toxicological research. The routes of these contaminants into the environment (e.g., wastewater discharge, sludge/biosolid, compost, or manure application to soil, wastewater irrigation, plant protection products), are a very important issue, as are the strategies required to cope with the risk of their entry into or persistence in the environment.

Dr. Paula Alvarenga
Prof. Dr. Patrícia Palma
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pharmaceuticals
  • nanomaterials
  • personal care products
  • hormones
  • flame retardants
  • plasticizers
  • per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs)
  • microplastics
  • abiotic compartments

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 3928 KiB  
Article
Study of Steroid Estrogen Loss in Soil after the Application of Composted Manure as a Fertilizer
by Jimeng Feng, Jian Shen, Yani Li, Lina Chi, Xinze Wang and Jiangping Qiu
Water 2024, 16(10), 1374; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16101374 - 11 May 2024
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Abstract
Steroid estrogens (SEs) play a significant role as endocrine-disrupting substances, and one of their major sources is animal manure. However, there is limited information available regarding the loss of SEs in farmland soil after the application of commercial composted animal manure or fertilizers. [...] Read more.
Steroid estrogens (SEs) play a significant role as endocrine-disrupting substances, and one of their major sources is animal manure. However, there is limited information available regarding the loss of SEs in farmland soil after the application of commercial composted animal manure or fertilizers. To address this gap, our study aimed to simulate rainfall and flood irrigation scenarios and investigate the loss characteristics of SEs, as well as Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Total Nitrogen (TN), and Total Phosphorus (TP) in runoff from soil–manure mixtures. The results demonstrated that the loss concentrations of SEs (73.1 ng/L of the mean E2β active equivalent factor) presented a potential environmental risk. Additionally, substituting composted manure with commercial organic fertilizers lead to a significant reduction in TP (maximum 56%) and TN (maximum 24%) loss. Consequently, the application of commercial organic fertilizers offers considerable advantages in maintaining nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization efficiency while controlling SEs loss. Furthermore, our study explored the synergistic pollution mechanism among these pollutants and observed significant correlations between SEs and TN, TP, and COD loss concentrations, indicating the simultaneous occurrence and migration of these pollutants in agricultural non-point source pollution. These results provide valuable insights into the environmental risk associated with SEs from agricultural non-point sources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Soil and Water Environment)
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