Emerging Challenges in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Effects

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Oceans and Coastal Zones".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2024 | Viewed by 6229

Special Issue Editors

School of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003, China
Interests: nonlinear water wave hydrodynamics; wave–structure interaction; water wave theory; hydrodynamic safety assessment of ports; computational fluid dynamics (CFD); coral reef hydrodynamics; tsunami dynamics; development of wave propagation model
State Key Laboratory of Internet of Things for Smart City and Department of Ocean Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macao 999078, China
Interests: sediment dynamics; granular–fluid interactions; coastal hazards and safety of coastal cities; evolution of beach and shoreline; meshless CFD methods; smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK
Interests: coastal resilience; marine renewable energy; wave–structure interaction; computational fluid dynamics
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: rogue (freak) waves; storm surge; coastal hazards and safety of coastal cities; tsunamis; ocean renewable energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to global warming and a rising sea level, the frequency of extreme marine environments is increasing. It has brought new problems and challenges to the safety of coastal and offshore structures and has also promoted the development of numerous novel ocean engineering technologies. This Special Issue aims to create a forum for both academia and industry to exchange the most recent achievements and progresses in tackling the emerging challenges in ocean engineering and the related marine environmental impacts. Original submissions reporting extreme marine environments, new marine renewable energy development, new marine structures, analysis methods and findings regarding all aspects of ocean engineering and related marine environments are welcome. Topics of interest in this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Coastal engineering;
  • Marine renewable energy;
  • Offshore engineering;
  • Deep-sea engineering;
  • Polar engineering;
  • Innovative marine structural design;
  • Innovative analysis technology for ocean engineering;
  • Extreme marine environments and their impacts;
  • Wave–structure interaction/soil (sand)–structure interaction;
  • Coastal zone disaster prevention and mitigation;
  • Reliability and survivability of marine structures;
  • Development of numerical tools for ocean engineering;
  • Development of model testing technology.

Prof. Dr. Junliang Gao
Dr. Huabin Shi
Prof. Dr. Jun Zang
Dr. Jinghua Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coastal engineering
  • offshore engineering
  • deep-sea engineering
  • polar engineering
  • extreme marine environments and their impacts

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 7498 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation of the Marine Environmental Capacity of Jinpu Bay
Water 2024, 16(3), 404; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16030404 - 25 Jan 2024
Viewed by 480
Abstract
Based on the study of the marine environmental capacity, a water quality model and a response field-based linear programming method are adopted here. Water quality control objectives are taken as the constraint conditions, according to the requirements of Jinpu Bay’s functional zoning. The [...] Read more.
Based on the study of the marine environmental capacity, a water quality model and a response field-based linear programming method are adopted here. Water quality control objectives are taken as the constraint conditions, according to the requirements of Jinpu Bay’s functional zoning. The pollutant response coefficient and water quality background value are combined with the values of the water concentration quality control points set in each functional area and the target value of the functional area wherein they are located. The maximum allowable emission intensity of inorganic nitrogen, phosphate and chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be calculated using the linear programming method of the maximum allowable emission of pollutants at estuaries or sewage outfall points on Jinpu Bay. The research results reveal the diffusion of marine pollutants and the marine environmental capacity of Jinpu Bay. Some rivers need to reduce the discharge intensity and some other outlets still have a certain residual capacity. Based on this, the environmental capacity of Jinpu Bay was evaluated, and a technical reference is provided for the economic development of the region and the formulation of pollutant emission control policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Challenges in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2928 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation of Hydrodynamic Characteristics of Layered Floating Reefs under Tidal Currents and Waves
Water 2023, 15(22), 3892; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15223892 - 08 Nov 2023
Viewed by 657
Abstract
Artificial floating reefs are an important supplement to bottom reefs in marine habitat construction, which provide a good environment for fish to survive, breed and habituate in the middle and upper layers of water. They can adapt to the silt bottom of the [...] Read more.
Artificial floating reefs are an important supplement to bottom reefs in marine habitat construction, which provide a good environment for fish to survive, breed and habituate in the middle and upper layers of water. They can adapt to the silt bottom of the East China Sea. To make full use of the water space and improve the effective space of the floating reef, based on the field tidal current data, an upper- and lower-layered artificial floating reef has been designed in this study. The connection method of the upper and lower reefs has been described in detail and a hydrodynamic numerical model has been established. At the same time, the effects of floating reef structure ratio, wave height and wave steepness on its force and motion are discussed under the action of tidal current and wave current. The result shows that, at a specific flow rate, the change of the proportion of the layered floating reef structure had little effect on the roll of the upper and lower reefs. The maximum roll angle does not exceed 15°, and the tilt angle of the upper and lower reefs is consistent, which ensures the good flow resistance and stability of the floating reef. Under the specific length of the connecting cable and the main mooring, the hydrodynamic characteristics of the layered floating reef are better when the ratio of the sum height of the lower reef and the connecting cable to the height of the upper reef is not greater than one and the extreme proportion structure is not considered. The tension of the stratified floating reef is proportional to the wave height and wave steepness under the action of wave and current. The main mooring rope is the most stressed, and the rolling motion of the upper and lower reefs is consistent. Above all, results can provide a theoretical basis for the optimization design of the artificial floating reef structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Challenges in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 4494 KiB  
Article
A Beach Profile Evolution Model Driven by the Hybrid Shock-Capturing Boussinesq Wave Solver
Water 2023, 15(21), 3799; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15213799 - 30 Oct 2023
Viewed by 631
Abstract
An existing Boussinesq wave model, solved in a hybrid format of the finite-difference method (FDM) and finite-volume method (FVM), with good merits of stability and shock-capturing, was used as the wave driver to simulate the beach evolution under nearshore wave action. By coupling [...] Read more.
An existing Boussinesq wave model, solved in a hybrid format of the finite-difference method (FDM) and finite-volume method (FVM), with good merits of stability and shock-capturing, was used as the wave driver to simulate the beach evolution under nearshore wave action. By coupling the boundary layer model, the sand transport model, and the terrain updating model, the beach evolution model is established. Based on the coupled model, the interaction process between sandbars and waves was simulated, reproducing the process of the original sand bars diminishing, new sandbars creating, and finally disappearing. At the same time, the formation and movement process of sand bars under solitary and regular waves are numerically simulated, in the breaking zone, the water bottom has a larger shear stress, which promotes the sediment activation, transport and erosion formation, and near the breaking point, the decrease of sand-carrying capacity is the main reason for the formation of sandbars, the numerical model can accurately describe the changes in the shoreline profile under wave action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Challenges in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 17566 KiB  
Article
Downscaling of Oceanic Chlorophyll-a with a Spatiotemporal Fusion Model: A Case Study on the North Coast of the Yellow Sea
Water 2023, 15(20), 3566; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15203566 - 12 Oct 2023
Viewed by 582
Abstract
Chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a) is an important indicator of coastal eutrophication. Remote sensing technology provides a global view of it. However, different types of sensors are subject to design constraints and cannot meet the requirements of high temporal and spatial resolution on nearshore engineering [...] Read more.
Chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a) is an important indicator of coastal eutrophication. Remote sensing technology provides a global view of it. However, different types of sensors are subject to design constraints and cannot meet the requirements of high temporal and spatial resolution on nearshore engineering simultaneously. To obtain high-spatiotemporal-resolution images, this study examines the performance of the enhanced spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model (ESTARFM) on GOCI and Landsat Chl-a data fusion. Considering the rapidly changing rate and consistency of oceanic Chl-a, the ESTARFM was modified via segmented fitting and numerical conversion. The results show that both fusion models can fuse multiple data advantages to obtain high-spatiotemporal-resolution Chl-a images. Compared with the ESTARFM, the modified solution has a better performance in terms of the root mean square error and correlation coefficient, and its results have better spatial consistency for coastal Chl-a. In addition, the new solution expands the data utilization range of data fusion by reducing the influence of the time interval of original data and realizes better monitoring of nearshore Chl-a changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Challenges in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 3672 KiB  
Communication
Upper-Layer Bacterioplankton Potentially Impact the Annual Variation and Carbon Cycling of the Bathypelagic Communities in the South China Sea
Water 2023, 15(19), 3359; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15193359 - 25 Sep 2023
Viewed by 659
Abstract
Pelagic bacterioplankton exhibit biogeographical patterns linked with exporting organic carbon and energy fluxes into the deep ocean. However, knowledge of the mechanisms shaping deep-sea bacterial communities remains largely elusive. In this study, we used high throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to [...] Read more.
Pelagic bacterioplankton exhibit biogeographical patterns linked with exporting organic carbon and energy fluxes into the deep ocean. However, knowledge of the mechanisms shaping deep-sea bacterial communities remains largely elusive. In this study, we used high throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to reveal significant annual bacterioplankton community dynamics in the South China Sea during three summer cruises (2016–2018). As we expected, the epipelagic–bathypelagic connective amplicon sequence variants (ASVs, mostly belonging to Actinobacteriota, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria) suggested that they not only affect the community structure but also influence the carbon cycling functions of bathypelagic bacterioplankton in different years. However, the microbial source tracking (MST) analysis indicated that the directly linked proportions between the bathypelagic and epipelagic samples were minimal. Thus, the epipelagic bacteria communities may form “seeds” rather than directly sinking into the deep ocean to influence bathypelagic bacteria. This study provides a new perspective on the mechanisms shaping the deep ocean bacterioplankton communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Challenges in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 3629 KiB  
Article
A Comparison of Ocean Wave Height Forecasting Methods for Ocean Wave Energy Conversion Systems
Water 2023, 15(18), 3256; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15183256 - 13 Sep 2023
Viewed by 712
Abstract
Ocean wave height plays an important role in the operation status of ocean wave energy conversion systems. In this paper, the future continuous ocean wave height within 2~3 s is forecasted by three methods, the autoregressive moving average model (ARMA) method, backpropagation (BP) [...] Read more.
Ocean wave height plays an important role in the operation status of ocean wave energy conversion systems. In this paper, the future continuous ocean wave height within 2~3 s is forecasted by three methods, the autoregressive moving average model (ARMA) method, backpropagation (BP) neural network method, and radial basis function (RBF) neural network method. Then, the error between suggested forecast results and corresponding measured results are compared by the root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), and correlation coefficient R. The comparison result indicates that the RBF neural network method is preferred to the other two methods, having the advantage of high accuracy. Lastly, the reasons for the errors of the three forecasting methods are analyzed. This study signifies that the RBF neural network method is beneficial to the operation control and efficiency improvement of ocean wave energy conversion systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Challenges in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2415 KiB  
Article
Study on the Wave-Dissipation Effect of Oyster Reefs Based on the SWAN Numerical Model
Water 2023, 15(16), 2884; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15162884 - 09 Aug 2023
Viewed by 852
Abstract
In the “Blue Bay Remediation Action” project, the oyster reef plays the dual role of ecological restoration and wave suppression, and the study of the effect of oyster reef wave dissipation forms the basis of relevant projects. Taking the Binzhou oyster reef ecological [...] Read more.
In the “Blue Bay Remediation Action” project, the oyster reef plays the dual role of ecological restoration and wave suppression, and the study of the effect of oyster reef wave dissipation forms the basis of relevant projects. Taking the Binzhou oyster reef ecological restoration project as its object, this paper studied the wave-dissipating effect of the oyster reef, using the SWAN model. The simulation results showed that after the deployment of oyster reefs in extreme high-water-level conditions, they could produce a wave-dissipation effect, with a wave-dissipation rate between 8% and 21%. Significant wave-dissipation effects can be produced under the designed high-water-level conditions, with a wave-height dissipation rate of 42% to 65%. Among them, the wave-dissipation effect of oyster reefs was more significant for waves coming from the ENE, NE, N, and NNE directions. This study could provide a scientific reference for the design and layout of oyster reefs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Challenges in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 3640 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study of Flow Kinematics and Impacting Pressures on a Suspended Horizontal Plate by Extreme Waves
Water 2023, 15(15), 2771; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15152771 - 31 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 695
Abstract
The flow kinematics and impacting pressures on a suspended horizontal plate under extreme waves were investigated experimentally. Three different stages of extreme waves, unbreaking, incipient breaking, and broken, were separately generated using a dispersive focusing method. The flow field kinematics around the plate [...] Read more.
The flow kinematics and impacting pressures on a suspended horizontal plate under extreme waves were investigated experimentally. Three different stages of extreme waves, unbreaking, incipient breaking, and broken, were separately generated using a dispersive focusing method. The flow field kinematics around the plate during the slamming process was measured using a combination of particle image velocimetry and bubble image velocimetry techniques. We found that for aerated areas, there are significant differences in flow patterns under different conditions. The velocity distribution in aeration areas is more discrete. The slamming peak on the upper surface is influenced greatly by the aeration effect, resulting in the maximum slamming peak of the unbreaking case being 3.8 kPa, which is 0.41 times larger than that of the incipient-breaking case and 1.12 times larger than that of the broken case. However, for the area below the plate, the slamming force and flow evolution under different types of breaking exhibit similarity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Challenges in Ocean Engineering and Environmental Effects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop