Solid Waste Management and Environmental Protection

A special issue of Waste (ISSN 2813-0391).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 12942

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Applied Science, School of Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada
Interests: sustainable construction materials; rammed earth; carbon capture; waste to value; biocomposites
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines) Dhanbad, Dhanbad, Jharkhand 826004, India
Interests: industrial waste valorization; different applications of waste resources
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

In the modern world, the management of liquid and solid industrial wastes present in the environment in massive quantities has remained one of the most intractable problems. Diverting the harmful anthropogenic waste fluxes from landfills is a significant contributor to environmental protection and climate change mitigation. Making use of waste resources is also a critical part of how we tackle the worldwide overconsumption of scarce virgin resources. Different possible ways forward in waste management would thus make significant progress in the circular economy, sustainable development, and zero waste goals. Integrated waste management is therefore a comprehensive goal with broad scope and global coverage. For this purpose, it is essential to track trends in the quantity, composition, and effects of various solid waste resources from the major industries. This will provide insight into the efficiency with which nations can reutilize (reuse/recycle) such waste materials and resources, and provides a means to better understand the effects of solid wastes on human health and ecological condition. Promoting the sustainable use of industrial solid waste resources must be further supported by developing the rationale and different assessment tools for taking a holistic approach towards solid waste management. These tools are designed to draw conclusions and make recommendations that assist decision makers and practitioners in developing sustainable solutions for local waste management problems.

This Special Issue on “Solid Waste Management and Environmental Protection” focuses on the recent developments in this field, and aims to bring together high-quality research articles on the various aspects of sustainable solid waste management, covering both the current state and remaining challenges. We welcome scientific manuscripts or reviews that address different aspects of waste management, such as waste reduction, reuse, and recycling; energy recovery; and land reclamation. Research into the various assessment and modeling tools for waste management based on life cycle assessments, multi-criteria decision-making, cost–benefit analysis, and risk assessment is also included within the scope. Comprehensive research into industrial waste characterization by measuring and estimating the quantity, composition, and effects of various industrial solid waste resources is also covered.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Advanced solid waste recycling technologies and resource recovery systems;
  • Environmental LCA for solid waste management;
  • Economic opportunities from solid waste management;
  • Situation, challenges, and solutions of policy implementation regarding solid waste management;
  • Case studies addressing specific waste management issues.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Sustainability.

Dr. Sumi Siddiqua
Prof. Dr. Sarat Das Kumar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Waste is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • solid waste
  • waste management issues
  • sustainability
  • zero waste
  • circular economy
  • waste treatment
  • resource recycling
  • waste to energy
  • policy making
  • life-cycle analysis

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

20 pages, 3378 KiB  
Article
Identifying Priorities for the Development of Waste Management Systems in ASEAN Cities
by Souphaphone Soudachanh, Alessio Campitelli and Stefan Salhofer
Waste 2024, 2(1), 102-121; https://doi.org/10.3390/waste2010006 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 847
Abstract
One of the largest issues facing countries, particularly emerging nations with high population, production, and consumption growth, is an inadequate waste management system (WMS). This paper analyzes the development of the waste management systems of nine capital cities in the Association of Southeast [...] Read more.
One of the largest issues facing countries, particularly emerging nations with high population, production, and consumption growth, is an inadequate waste management system (WMS). This paper analyzes the development of the waste management systems of nine capital cities in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region by using a recently developed approach, the Waste Management System–Development Stage Concept. This concept comprises five development stages and various components, including Collection and Transport, Waste Disposal, Energy Recovery, Waste Recycling, and Waste Prevention and Reuse. The findings indicate that in terms of waste collection, waste disposal, and energy recovery, Singapore is at a higher development stage (Stage 5) and is more advanced than other ASEAN cities. For most of the components, Bangkok, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, and Manila fall into stages 2 to 4, whereas the early development stages 1 to 3 are present in Bandar Seri Begawan, Hanoi, Phnom Penh, and Vientiane. The results will be used to determine the next steps in developing the WMSs, including the introduction of separate collection for recycling or the installation of a waste-to-energy plant. The environmental impact of each measure will be later assessed using the LCA approach, and the most effective measures shall be identified in future studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid Waste Management and Environmental Protection)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 4481 KiB  
Article
Effects of Clay Minerals on Enzyme Activity as a Potential Biosensor of Soil Pollution in Alice Township
by Nontobeko Gloria Maphuhla and Opeoluwa Oyehan Oyedeji
Waste 2024, 2(1), 85-101; https://doi.org/10.3390/waste2010005 - 09 Feb 2024
Viewed by 578
Abstract
Inadequate waste management and illegal trash dumping continue to be the leading causes of severe environmental pollution. Human exposure to harmful heavy metals has emerged as a serious health concern on the continent. Some people in Alice, a small town, grow their food [...] Read more.
Inadequate waste management and illegal trash dumping continue to be the leading causes of severe environmental pollution. Human exposure to harmful heavy metals has emerged as a serious health concern on the continent. Some people in Alice, a small town, grow their food in home gardens. They use animal manure and compost derived from soil obtained from landfills to enhance the fertility of the garden soil. Heavy metal heaps in garbage disposals are constantly present, releasing dangerous amounts of metal into the environment. The harmful effects of heavy metals on plants lead to unsanitary conditions and environmental problems. Animals and people who consume these vegetables may also be at risk for health problems. Assessing the soil’s enzyme activity can potentially lessen the negative effects of the accumulated pollutants and improve the soil’s overall health and quality. Soil enzymes are biologically active components that have a catalytic impact and are released from root exudates, crop residues, and animal remains. The activity of enzymes serves as an excellent bioindicator of soil cleanliness and quality because they are sensitive to heavy metals. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to quantify the mineral elements in soil using 40 kV parallel beam optics, 30 mA, and CuKα radiation. Meanwhile, the activity of the enzyme was essayed in different coupled substrates. Thirteen (13) clay minerals were found, including Talc 2M, Kaolinite 2M, and Chlorite Lawsonite Muscovite 2M1. The detected trace elements have high concentration levels that exceed the World Health Organization’s (WHO) allowed levels. The identified elements affected the enzyme activity at different levels. The Mn, Al, Si, V, Ti, and Ca negatively affect soil enzyme activity, specifically invertase (INV). However, the amount of Mg, K, Fe, and Zn showed a slightly positive effect on the same enzyme (INV). According to this view, these elements come from several sources, each with a particular impact on soil contamination and enzyme activity. High levels of heavy metals in this study may be due to improper waste disposal, limited recycling opportunities, lack of public awareness, and inadequate enforcement of waste management regulations. It is essential to employ Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) technologies, correct disposal techniques, suitable agricultural methods, preventive regulations, and efficient waste management to mitigate the negative effects of heavy metals on the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid Waste Management and Environmental Protection)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 3943 KiB  
Article
Urban Governance of Household Waste and Sustainable Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Study from Yaoundé (Cameroon)
by Salifou Ndam, Alirou Fit Touikoue, Jérôme Chenal, Jean-Claude Baraka Munyaka, Armel Kemajou and Abdou Kouomoun
Waste 2023, 1(3), 612-630; https://doi.org/10.3390/waste1030036 - 04 Jul 2023
Viewed by 2516
Abstract
More and more cities in Southern Africa are struggling to manage their waste in a context of rapid urbanisation and increasing poverty. In the Cameroon’s largest city, Yaoundé, managing household waste is a growing concern. The public and the authorities cast blame on [...] Read more.
More and more cities in Southern Africa are struggling to manage their waste in a context of rapid urbanisation and increasing poverty. In the Cameroon’s largest city, Yaoundé, managing household waste is a growing concern. The public and the authorities cast blame on each other, and the actions taken by each party far from guarantee an efficient management of household waste, which litters the streets. Considering the above, this paper analyses the socio-political practices of stakeholders and their influence on household waste management in Yaoundé. Based on a qualitative survey that combined both a literature review and interviews, the research analysed the challenges related to household waste management with regard to the economy, the environment, and public health. In addition, a cartographic survey using KoboToolbox was conducted in all seven municipalities to analyse the geographical distribution of the waste areas, their size, and their status within the city organizational framework. In total, 264 waste dumps were collected, of which 110 were formal waste using a waste bin of varying size. Social constructivism, stakeholder theory, and strategic analysis were mobilized to analyse the urban waste governance in Yaoundé. Thus, the poor quality of household waste management in Yaoundé was explained using political, economic, sociocultural, and environmental parameters. The social practices and dynamics of the stakeholders generate undesirable consequences that hinder the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). By combining social science and engineering methods, this research aims to demonstrate that the shortcomings of waste governance in Yaoundé are both a collective (authorities/public powers) and individual (citizens) matter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid Waste Management and Environmental Protection)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

25 pages, 3039 KiB  
Review
A Decade Review of Research Trends Using Waste Materials in the Building and Construction Industry: A Pathway towards a Circular Economy
by Robert Haigh
Waste 2023, 1(4), 935-959; https://doi.org/10.3390/waste1040054 - 20 Nov 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2033
Abstract
The construction industry is among the most prominent contributors to global resource consumption, waste production, and greenhouse gas emissions. A pivotal step toward mitigating these sectoral impacts lies in the adoption of a circular production and consumption system. The use of alternative waste [...] Read more.
The construction industry is among the most prominent contributors to global resource consumption, waste production, and greenhouse gas emissions. A pivotal step toward mitigating these sectoral impacts lies in the adoption of a circular production and consumption system. The use of alternative waste materials can mitigate landfill accumulation and the associated detrimental environmental effects. To highlight unconventional materials, this study began with a bibliometric assessment via a bibliography analyzis software called “Bibliometrix” (version 4.1.3). The outputs from the analyzis can assist in identifying research trends, gaps in literature and benchmark research performance. The search engine used for sourcing publications was Scopus, using the main criteria as “Waste materials used in building and construction”. The time-period analysed was from 2013 to 2023. The results included publications obtained in journal articles, book chapters and conference proceedings. The assessment reviewed 6238 documents from 1482 sources. The results revealed an array of waste materials; however, rubber, textiles, and ceramics had a significant reduction in research attention. Rubber waste presents promising opportunities in civil concrete construction methods. The preparatory steps of textile fibres in composite materials are frequently disregarded, resulting in structural issues for the end-product. Obstacles persist in ceramic technology due to the absence of transparency, primarily because industry entities closely safeguard proprietary information. While sustainability research often emphasizes emissions, practical trials commonly revolve around integrating materials into current systems. A more comprehensive approach, contemplating the complete lifecycle of materials, could provide deeper insights into fostering sustainable construction practices. Researchers can use these findings when determining trends, research gaps, and future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid Waste Management and Environmental Protection)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 7885 KiB  
Review
Mechanical Recycling of Thermoplastics: A Review of Key Issues
by Alae Lamtai, Said Elkoun, Mathieu Robert, Frej Mighri and Carl Diez
Waste 2023, 1(4), 860-883; https://doi.org/10.3390/waste1040050 - 04 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3689
Abstract
During the last decade, the consumption of plastics has increased highly in parallel with plastic waste. The transition towards a circular economy is the only way to prevent the environment from landfilling and incineration. This review details the recycling techniques with a focus [...] Read more.
During the last decade, the consumption of plastics has increased highly in parallel with plastic waste. The transition towards a circular economy is the only way to prevent the environment from landfilling and incineration. This review details the recycling techniques with a focus on mechanical recycling of polymers, which is the most known and developed technique in industries. The different steps of mechanical recycling have been highlighted, starting from sorting technologies to the different decontamination processes. This paper covers degradation mechanisms and ways to improve commodity polymers (Polyolefins), engineering polymers (PET, PA6), and bio-sourced polymers (PLA and PHB). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid Waste Management and Environmental Protection)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

26 pages, 1371 KiB  
Review
A Review of Beneficial Use and Management of Dredged Material
by Pranshoo Solanki, Bhupesh Jain, Xi Hu and Gaurav Sancheti
Waste 2023, 1(3), 815-840; https://doi.org/10.3390/waste1030048 - 10 Sep 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2426
Abstract
This study systematically examined dredged materials from various aspects, including their sources, the volume generated annually, beneficial uses, and the management processes currently practiced. In addition, this paper presents the relevant policies governing the dredging, reuse, and disposal of dredged materials in the [...] Read more.
This study systematically examined dredged materials from various aspects, including their sources, the volume generated annually, beneficial uses, and the management processes currently practiced. In addition, this paper presents the relevant policies governing the dredging, reuse, and disposal of dredged materials in the United States. A summary of various sources, types/classifications, and the physical and chemical properties of dredged materials used by various researchers are presented. This paper also summarizes the innovative techniques for the beneficial reuse of dredged materials in a wide range of applications in concrete materials, construction products, roadway construction, habitat building, landfill liner/cap, agriculture soil reconstruction, and beach nourishment. Further, limitations and corresponding solutions related to the beneficial use and management of dredged materials were provided in the end. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid Waste Management and Environmental Protection)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop