Imaging the Choroid

A special issue of Vision (ISSN 2411-5150).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021) | Viewed by 10840

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Nilima Sinha Medical College and Hospital, Madhepura, Bihar, India
2. Jacobs Retina Center, Shiley Eye Institute, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA
Interests: optical coherence tomography; OCT angiography; polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy; central serous chorioretinopathy; diabetic retinopathy; choroidal disorders
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the advancement of in vivo imaging technology, the understanding of the choroid has improved significantly.

Optical coherence tomography angiography has further advanced the imaging of choroidal vessels, particularly choriocapillaris. Choroidal biomarkers, such as choroidal vascularity index and other quantitative biomarkers, explain various choroidal features in health and diseases. New terminologies and new biomarkers relevant to the choroid are becoming part of clinical practice. Upcoming imaging research on the choroidal vasculature involving adaptive optics and holography will certainly add further knowledge. This Special Issue invites articles focused on choroid imaging, including choroidal imaging findings in various diseases using commercially available devices as well as research models, image processing and its application, new biomarkers, and innovative imaging techniques for the choroid.  

Dr. Jay Chhablani
Dr. Sumit Randhir Singh
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Choroid
  • Choroidal vascularity
  • Central Serous Chorioretinopathy
  • Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy
  • Age-related macular degeneration
  • Pachychoroid
  • OCT
  • OCT angiography
  • En-face OCT
  • Choroidal neovascularization
  • Choriocapillaris

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 150 KiB  
Editorial
Imaging the Choroid
by Sumit Randhir Singh and Jay Chhablani
Vision 2020, 4(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision4030038 - 16 Aug 2020
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Abstract
The choroid is the most vascular tissue of the eye, sandwiched between sclera and retina, and responsible for blood supply of the outer retina [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging the Choroid)

Research

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7 pages, 2097 KiB  
Article
Artifact-Free Evaluation of Choriocapillaris Perfusion in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy
by Maria A. Burnasheva, Alexei N. Kulikov and Dmitrii S. Maltsev
Vision 2021, 5(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision5010003 - 28 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2380
Abstract
In this study, using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) we evaluated choriocapillaris perfusion in eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) after excluding all possible artifacts caused by alterations of neurosensory retina or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have included 22 unilateral acute CSC [...] Read more.
In this study, using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) we evaluated choriocapillaris perfusion in eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) after excluding all possible artifacts caused by alterations of neurosensory retina or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have included 22 unilateral acute CSC patients (18 males and four females, 41.8 ± 5.7 years) and 18 healthy subjects (13 males and five females, 40.9 ± 9.7 years). The number of flow voids per 1 mm2 of scan area and percentage of flow signal area was calculated based on choriocapillaris slab of 3 × 3 mm2 OCTA scans after excluding all possible artifacts caused by alterations of neurosensory retina or RPE. The percentage of flow signal area after the exclusion of neurosensory retina and RPE alterations in the eyes of healthy individuals was higher than in CSC eyes (p = 0.006) and fellow unaffected eyes of CSC patients (p = 0.02). The number of flow voids larger than 25,000 µm2 in eyes of healthy individuals was lower than in the CSC eyes (p = 0.0006). There were no statistically significant differences in study parameters between CSC eyes and fellow eyes of CSC patients (p > 0.05). The general decrease of choriocapillaris perfusion in both eyes of CSC patients exists independently of the presence of acute disease or asymptomatic structural RPE changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging the Choroid)
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Review

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17 pages, 7198 KiB  
Review
Current Choroidal Imaging Findings in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy
by Gideon Nkrumah, Dmitrii S. Maltsev, Paez-Escamilla A. Manuel, Mohammed A. Rasheed, Marianno Cozzi, Alessandro Ivernizzi, Marco Lupidi, Sumit Randhir Singh and Jay Chhablani
Vision 2020, 4(4), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision4040044 - 16 Oct 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 5751
Abstract
Background: Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) is a chorioretinal disease affecting mostly middle age males. It is marked by the serous detachment of the neurosensory layer at the macula. This review of the literature provides a framework of the current characteristic/relevant imaging findings of [...] Read more.
Background: Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) is a chorioretinal disease affecting mostly middle age males. It is marked by the serous detachment of the neurosensory layer at the macula. This review of the literature provides a framework of the current characteristic/relevant imaging findings of CSCR. Although the pathogenesis of CSCR is unclear, the choroid plays a major role and its changes are fundamental to the diagnosis and treatment of CSCR. Methods: A systematic literature search focusing on current multimodal imaging for CSCR was performed. Only articles reporting on original clinical data were selected, studies in a language other than English were included only if an English abstract was provided. Additional sources included articles cited in the references list of the first selected articles. We deduced imaging findings based on current and relevant literature on the topic. Results: We found that sub foveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) and choroidal vascularity index (CVI) were greater in eyes with acute CSCR than in eyes with chronic CSCR or normal eyes. There was increased choroidal thickness (CT) in the macula compared to peripapillary region. In healthy eyes, the highest CVI was found in the nasal region followed by the inferior, temporal, and superior quadrant. The area with the least CVI was the macula. In eyes with CSCR, 100% had asymmetric dominant vortex veins compared to 38% in normal eyes. Conclusion: Choroidal imaging has advanced the diagnosis of CSCR. This has led to numerous imaging biomarkers like CVI, CT, and hyper-reflective dots for early detection and possible prognostication of CSCR. More techniques like wide field scans and en face imaging are being employed to characterize the choroid in CSCR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Imaging the Choroid)
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