Advances in Animal Dermatology

Editor


E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
INFINITy, Université de Toulouse, ENVT (École Nationale Vétérinaire de Toulouse), Toulouse, France
Interests: dermatology; canine atopic dermatitis; ectoparasites; therapeutics; dogs; cats; farm animals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dermatology is a discipline characterized by a growing importance in veterinary medical activity and a constant and particularly rapid progress of knowledge favored by specific and vigorous clinical research.

This Topical Collection of Veterinary Sciences, “Advances in Animal Dermatology”, will publish original articles, brief communications, case reports, case series, and reviews on the latest issues of the skin diseases in companion and large animals. It will encompass all aspects of veterinary dermatology: preclinical and clinical research, and diagnosis and treatment of various skin disorders, including, but not limited to, allergies, infections, ectoparasites, otitis, skin oncology, congenital anomalies, or cutaneous manifestation of systemic diseases.

Based on your expertise in this field, we think you can effectively contribute to the success of this initiative. We also hope that this collection will stimulate closer collaboration between researchers in veterinary and medical sciences in addressing this important topic in small-animal medicine.

Dr. Marie-Christine Cadiergues
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dog
  • cat
  • exotic animals
  • ruminants
  • horses
  • skin diseases
  • diagnosis
  • treatment
  • prevention

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

2023

10 pages, 3807 KiB  
Case Report
The Bacteriophages Therapy of Interdigital Pyoderma Complicated by Cellulitis with Antibiotic-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Dog—Case Report
by Mariana Grecu, Mădălina-Elena Henea, Cristina Mihaela Rîmbu, Cătălina Simion, Eusebiu-Viorel Şindilar and Gheorghe Solcan
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(11), 642; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10110642 - 05 Nov 2023
Viewed by 3545
Abstract
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly pathogenic bacterium with high pathogenicity, that can cause serious infections in all species and especially in dogs. Treatment of the infection induced by this bacterium can be a challenge considering that some strains have developed resistance to most classes [...] Read more.
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly pathogenic bacterium with high pathogenicity, that can cause serious infections in all species and especially in dogs. Treatment of the infection induced by this bacterium can be a challenge considering that some strains have developed resistance to most classes of antimicrobials. The use of bacteriophages to alleviate infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has demonstrated their potential for both internal and external applications. This study aimed to illustrate the treatment with bacteriophages in bacterially complicated skin lesions that do not respond to antimicrobial therapy. Full article
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7 pages, 5073 KiB  
Brief Report
Macroscopic Skin Examination Can Determine the Number of Strips Necessary to Study the stratum corneum in Dogs
by Marion Mosca, Mélanie Legain, Guillaume Noël, Adrien Idée and Didier Pin
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(9), 547; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10090547 - 01 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1224
Abstract
To evaluate the skin barrier, the stratum corneum (SC) must be isolated and extracted. Currently, skin biopsy is the gold standard method to investigate skin immunology and the presence of biomarkers in dogs. However, a standardized, non-invasive tool to exclusively remove the SC [...] Read more.
To evaluate the skin barrier, the stratum corneum (SC) must be isolated and extracted. Currently, skin biopsy is the gold standard method to investigate skin immunology and the presence of biomarkers in dogs. However, a standardized, non-invasive tool to exclusively remove the SC would be of great interest to study healthy and atopic dogs. In this study, we performed D-squames® tape stripping with standardized pressure on seven healthy beagle dogs. A control site was defined and then 25 strips, 50 strips and as many strips as needed to achieve a shiny appearance of the skin were performed on three different experimental sites. After stripping, blinded histopathological examination of a skin biopsy from each site was performed. The number of tape strips required for the skin to become shiny varied between individuals, with a mean of 40 (29–50) strips. There was no significant difference in SC depth between the control site and the site that underwent 25 tape strips. In contrast, the use of 50 strips removed almost all of the SC, with a mean remaining SC depth of 7.82 µm. These data suggest that this non-invasive method can effectively remove the SC, with individual variability, and that a shiny appearance of the skin after stripping can be used as an accurate marker of SC removal. Full article
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28 pages, 42282 KiB  
Review
Chronic Progressive Lymphedema in Belgian Draft Horses: Understanding and Managing a Challenging Disease
by Marieke Brys, Edwin Claerebout and Koen Chiers
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(5), 347; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10050347 - 12 May 2023
Viewed by 4891
Abstract
Chronic progressive lymphedema (CPL) in draft horses is characterized by increased dermal thickness and fibrosis, with the development of skinfolds and nodules, hyperkeratosis, and ulcerations on the distal limbs of affected horses. Secondary bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infections frequently complicate and aggravate the [...] Read more.
Chronic progressive lymphedema (CPL) in draft horses is characterized by increased dermal thickness and fibrosis, with the development of skinfolds and nodules, hyperkeratosis, and ulcerations on the distal limbs of affected horses. Secondary bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infections frequently complicate and aggravate the lesions, as well as the progression of this disease. CPL has a particularly high prevalence of up to 85.86% in the Belgian draft horse breed. Due to the disease’s progressive and incurable nature, affected horses are often euthanized prematurely. The treatment options are solely symptomatic, aimed at improving the horse’s quality of life. Despite the severity of this condition, many uncertainties about its etiology and pathogenesis still remain to date. The established scientific research on CPL is rather limited, although there is an urgent need for strategies to tackle this disease. This review summarizes the available knowledge, serving as a guideline for practitioners, and provides perspectives for future research programs. Full article
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12 pages, 1292 KiB  
Article
Performance and Tolerance of a Protocol for Idiopathic Chronic Greasy Seborrhea in 18 Dogs Using a Shampoo and Mousse Containing Plant Extracts
by Jevgenija Kondratjeva, Jessie Brun, Nicolas Amalric, Fabien Moog, Daniel Combarros, Charline Pressanti, Claudine Zemirline, Nadège Maubert, Elodie Ollivier, Marina Gatellet and Marie Christine Cadiergues
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(2), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10020095 - 28 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1867
Abstract
The study aimed to evaluate the tolerance, performance and effect on hair lipids and skin hydration of a protocol combining applications of one shampoo and subsequent mousses containing plant extracts (Ophytrium and Seboliance) in dogs with an undiagnosed chronic greasy keratinisation disorder. Six [...] Read more.
The study aimed to evaluate the tolerance, performance and effect on hair lipids and skin hydration of a protocol combining applications of one shampoo and subsequent mousses containing plant extracts (Ophytrium and Seboliance) in dogs with an undiagnosed chronic greasy keratinisation disorder. Six dogs were washed with plain water on day (D)0. Twelve dogs were shampooed on D0 and received eight mousse applications at 48–72 h intervals from D2 to D18. Clinical score (CS), Natural Moisturizing Factors (NMF) and hair lipids (HL) were evaluated on D0, D0 + 4 h, D7, D14 and D24. At baseline, no significant differences were observed in CS, NMF and HL between groups. In the control group, CS and HL remained stable throughout the study while a slight decrease in NMF was observed at D0 + 4 h. CS was significantly reduced in the test group between D0 and D7 (−53%) which reached 91% at D24 (p < 0.05), with no side effects. NMF levels decreased in the test group at D0 + 4 h (−73%, p < 0.0001) and returned to baseline from D14. In conclusion, one shampoo and subsequent mousse applications rapidly and safely improved coat quality in dogs with an undiagnosed keratinisation disorder without affecting NMF and HL contents over the study period. Full article
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