Effects of Environmental Hazardous Substances on Animal Physiology and Endocrine System

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 1887

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Tuwima 10, 10-747 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: environmental pollution; environmental toxicology; endocrine disruption; reproductive endocrinology; ecotoxicology; toxicity toxicology; cell biology; physiology; testosterone

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Three themes should be included in this Special Issue:

1) The impact of environmental metabolites of pesticides on animal reproduction processes, especially as “orphan receptor” ligands.

2) The problem of microplastics. This has been noticed, but it seems that, still, too little attention is paid to studying the mechanisms of its harmful effects on living organisms.

3) The interactions of xenobiotics and substances of natural origin (phytoestrogens, mycotoxins, etc.) that may occur simultaneously in feed and food are poorly documented.

Although there is quite a large body of research on the subject, it mostly concerns laboratory animals. Some were performed on farm animals and only a few were performed on species accompanying humans and wild species. From the point of view of veterinary medicine, there are also few descriptions of specific cases of the action of various xenobiotics encountered by both veterinarians and scientists studying this problem.

Dr. Jarosław J. Młynarczuk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • pesticides
  • environmental metabolite of xenobiotics
  • microplastics
  • orphan receptors
  • phytoestrogens
  • mycotoxins
  • endocrine disruption
  • disorders of reproduction processes

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 9076 KiB  
Article
Environmental Cadmium Exposure Perturbs Gut Microbial Dysbiosis in Ducks
by Xuefei Wang, Junxian Mi, Kun Yang and Lian Wang
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(11), 649; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10110649 - 09 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1439
Abstract
Ore extraction, chemical production, and agricultural fertilizers may release significant amounts of heavy metals, which may eventually accumulate widely in the environment and organisms over time, causing global ecological and health problems. As a recognized environmental contaminant, cadmium has been demonstrated to cause [...] Read more.
Ore extraction, chemical production, and agricultural fertilizers may release significant amounts of heavy metals, which may eventually accumulate widely in the environment and organisms over time, causing global ecological and health problems. As a recognized environmental contaminant, cadmium has been demonstrated to cause osteoporosis and renal injury, but research regarding the effects of cadmium on gut microbiota in ducks remains scarce. Herein, we aimed to characterize the adverse effects of cadmium on gut microbiota in ducks. Results indicated that cadmium exposure dramatically decreased gut microbial alpha diversity and caused significant changes in the main component of gut microbiota. Moreover, we also observed significant changes in the gut microbial composition in ducks exposed to cadmium. A microbial taxonomic investigation showed that Firmicutes, Bacteroidota, and Proteobacteria were the most preponderant phyla in ducks regardless of treatment, but the compositions and abundances of dominant genera were different. Meanwhile, a Metastats analysis indicated that cadmium exposure also caused a distinct increase in the levels of 1 phylum and 22 genera, as well as a significant reduction in the levels of 1 phylum and 36 genera. In summary, this investigation demonstrated that cadmium exposure could disturb gut microbial homeostasis by decreasing microbial diversity and altering microbial composition. Additionally, under the background of the rising environmental pollution caused by heavy metals, this investigation provides a crucial message for the assessment of environmental risks associated with cadmium exposure. Full article
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