Recent Findings in Equine Reproduction and Neonatology

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 8566

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Theriogenology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mansoura University, Dakahlia 35516, Egypt
Interests: theriogenology; fertility; gonads; placenta; reproductive endocrinology; AMH; placentitis; preterm birth

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Guest Editor
Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, College Station, TX 76549, USA
Interests: animal reproduction; horse reproduction
UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA 95616, USA
Interests: equine placenta development and its pathologies; host-pathogen interaction during equine placentitis; effects of assisted reproductive techniques on placenta; biotechnology of reproduction

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Guest Editor
Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia da USP, Universidade de São Paulo, Sao Paulo 05508-060, Brazil
Interests: animal reproduction; horse reproduction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is beyond question that Equine Reproduction is unique in many aspects, like the characteristic ovarian anatomy, the selective transport of embryo through the uterine tube, the signaling of maternal recognition of pregnancy, the challenging in vitro fertilization, and the formation of embryo capsule and endometrial cups, among other characteristics. Thus, innovative research in this field is crucial to provide the foundation for improved knowledge and clinical applications.

For this special issue, we are pleased to invite original research manuscripts, review papers, and case reports that address recent advancements in equine reproduction and neonatology, leading to fundamental insights in this field.

Areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Reproductive cycle manipulation and hormonal therapy
  • Suppression of estrus
  • Mare and stallion subfertility/Infertility
  • In vitro embryo production
  • Fertilization
  • Neonatal pathologies.

Dr. Hossam El Sheikh Ali
Dr. Yatta Linhares Boakari
Dr. Pouya Dini
Dr. Claudia Barbosa Fernandes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • equidae
  • reproduction
  • gametes
  • embryo
  • endometrium
  • pregnancy
  • placenta
  • parturition
  • neonatology
  • endocrinology
  • assisted reproduction (e.g. oocyte maturation, sperm selection method, IVP, SCNT, etc)

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 284 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Supplemental Lighting during the Late Gestation Period on Post-Partum Mechanical Properties of Mare and Foal Guard Hair
by András Gáspárdy, Gemma Gallagher, Boróka Bartha, Helene Haaland and Sándor György Fekete
Vet. Sci. 2024, 11(1), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci11010049 - 22 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1261
Abstract
This study investigates Thoroughbred mares exposed or not to supplemental blue light at the end of the gestation. Sixty mares and their 60 foals were selected for the investigation. Guard hair samples were collected from the shoulder just after (within 12 h) the [...] Read more.
This study investigates Thoroughbred mares exposed or not to supplemental blue light at the end of the gestation. Sixty mares and their 60 foals were selected for the investigation. Guard hair samples were collected from the shoulder just after (within 12 h) the parturition or birth. The foals of the light-treated mares developed significantly (p < 0.05) shorter hair than those of the control mares. A general effect of light treatment on basal hair diameter thinning could be demonstrated (p < 0.005). The maximum force of hair samples of light-treated mares and foals (0.098 and 0.085 N, respectively) was significantly lower than that of the control (0.272 and 0.178 N, respectively). The tensile strength (82.2 N/mm2) of the foal hair samples of the light-treated mares was significantly lower than that of the control foals (121.6 N/mm2). Although no significant difference was found in the elongation (ΔL), the hair of the control animals (mares and foals together) was more elastic than that of the treated animals (335 vs. 262 μm). In conclusion, the supplemental blue light treatment of the pregnant mares has a decreasing effect on both mares and their foals on the mechanical properties of the hair, making it shorter, thinner, and weaker. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Findings in Equine Reproduction and Neonatology)
13 pages, 4095 KiB  
Article
Effect of Sampling Method on Detection of the Equine Uterine Microbiome during Estrus
by B. A. Heil, M. van Heule, S. K. Thompson, T. A. Kearns, E. L. Oberhaus, G. King, P. Daels, P. Dini and J. L. Sones
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(11), 644; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10110644 - 08 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1802
Abstract
Bacterial endometritis is among the most common causes of subfertility in mares. It has a major economic impact on the equine breeding industry. The sensitivity of detecting uterine microbes using culture-based methods, irrespective of the sample collection method, double-guarded endometrial swab, endometrial biopsy, [...] Read more.
Bacterial endometritis is among the most common causes of subfertility in mares. It has a major economic impact on the equine breeding industry. The sensitivity of detecting uterine microbes using culture-based methods, irrespective of the sample collection method, double-guarded endometrial swab, endometrial biopsy, or uterine low-volume lavage (LVL), is low. Therefore, equine bacterial endometritis often goes undiagnosed. Sixteen individual mares were enrolled, and an endometrial sample was obtained using each method from all mares. After trimming, quality control and decontamination, 3824 amplicon sequence variants were detected in the dataset. We found using 16S rRNA sequencing that the equine uterus harbors a distinct resident microbiome during estrus. All three sampling methods used yielded similar results in composition as well as relative abundance at phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidota) and genus (Klebsiella, Mycoplasma, and Aeromonas) levels. A significant difference was found in alpha diversity (Chao1) between LVL and endometrial biopsy, suggesting that LVL is superior at detecting the low-abundant (rare) taxa. These new data could pave the way for innovative treatment methods for endometrial disease and subfertility in mares. This, in turn, could lead to more judicious antimicrobial use in the equine breeding industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Findings in Equine Reproduction and Neonatology)
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9 pages, 536 KiB  
Article
Galectins in Equine Placental Disease
by Carleigh E. Fedorka, Hossam El-Sheikh Ali and Mats H. T. Troedsson
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(3), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10030218 - 13 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1349
Abstract
Galectins are proteins that bind to glycans in targeted cells and function in cell-to-cell signaling throughout the body. Galectins have been found to be involved in various reproductive processes, including placental dysfunction, but this has not been investigated in the horse. Therefore, the [...] Read more.
Galectins are proteins that bind to glycans in targeted cells and function in cell-to-cell signaling throughout the body. Galectins have been found to be involved in various reproductive processes, including placental dysfunction, but this has not been investigated in the horse. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess alterations in galectin expression of the abnormal placenta in pregnant mares. Next-generation RNA sequencing was performed on the postpartum chorioallantois of two placental pathologies following clinical cases of ascending placentitis (n = 7) and focal mucoid placentitis (n = 4), while chorioallantois from healthy postpartum pregnancies (n = 8; 4 control samples per disease group) served as the control. When evaluating ascending placentitis, both galectin-1 (p < 0.001) and galectin-3BP (p = 0.05) increased in the postpartum chorioallantois associated with disease, while galectin-8 (p < 0.0001) and galectin-12 (p < 0.01) decreased in the diseased chorioallantois in comparison with those in the control. In mares with focal mucoid placentitis, numerous galectins increased in the diseased chorioallantois, and this included galectin-1 (p < 0.01), galectin-3BP (p = 0.03), galectin-9 (p = 0.02), and galectin-12 (p = 0.04), in addition to a trend toward increases in galectin-3 (p = 0.08) and galectin-13 (p = 0.09). In contrast, galectin-8 expression decreased (p = 0.04) in the diseased chorioallantois in comparison with that of the controls. In conclusion, galectins alter in abnormal placentae with variations observed among two forms of placental pathologies. These cytokine-like proteins may further our understanding of placental pathophysiology and warrant attention as potential markers of placental inflammation and dysfunction in the horse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Findings in Equine Reproduction and Neonatology)
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17 pages, 1609 KiB  
Article
Semen Quality of the First and Second Ejaculates Collected from Breeding Inactive Stallions after Cooling and Freezing
by Giorgia Podico, Kianna M. Spencer, Humberto B. Magalhaes and Igor F. Canisso
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(3), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10030173 - 21 Feb 2023
Viewed by 2308
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the semen quality after the cooling and freezing of the first and second ejaculates of the season, which were collected 1 h apart. After collection (n = 40 ejaculates), the gel-free semen volume, concentration, total number of sperm, [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess the semen quality after the cooling and freezing of the first and second ejaculates of the season, which were collected 1 h apart. After collection (n = 40 ejaculates), the gel-free semen volume, concentration, total number of sperm, and sperm morphology were determined. An aliquot of each ejaculate was extended and cooled for 48 h; a second aliquot was cushion-centrifuged and cooled for 48 h; and a third aliquot was processed and then frozen. The total motility (TM) and progressive motility (PM), plasma membrane integrity (PMI), and high mitochondrial membrane potential (HMMP) were assessed pre-(0 h), 24 h, and 48 h post-cooling and before and after freezing. The second ejaculate had a lower gel-free semen volume (p = 0.026). The sperm concentration was greater in the first than in the second ejaculate (p < 0.001). The sperm morphology was similar between the ejaculates (p > 0.05). Cushion-centrifugation prevented a reduction in the TM, PM, and PMI over time (p < 0.05). The TM, PM, and PMI decreased after freezing but not between the ejaculates (p > 0.05). The first and second ejaculates of the season, which were collected 1 h apart, varied in quantity but not in quality after cooling and freezing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Findings in Equine Reproduction and Neonatology)
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