Veterinary Dermatology: Challenges and Advances

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Microbiology, Parasitology and Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 15640

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Interuniversity Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Veterinärpl. 1, 1210 Wien, Austria
Interests: dermatology and veterinary internal medicine

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
Interests: dermatology; allergology and immunology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Skin lesions in companion animals are common, promptly visualized by pet owners, and often cause pruritus, diminishing the quality of life of owners. Therefore, animals with dermatological problems present the majority of visits to general practitioners. Diagnosing and treating skin diseases has faced many changes in the last decade and will continue doing so. One example is the new class of drug for flea and tick prevention known as isoxazolines, which is highly effective against ectoparasites, with demodicosis and sarcoptes cases decreasing. Not so new challenges of antimicrobial resistance are still spreading; however, resistance patterns have changed from “only” methicillin-resistant to multi-drug resistant staphylococcus pseudintermedius in many parts of the world. Additionally, the pandemic has changed the way we provide care utilizing telemedicine for patients. 

This Special Issue aims to review and present the state-of-the-art of diagnosis and treatment for dermatological diseases but will also feature articles and reviews about new approaches for diagnosing skin diseases and new treatment options, including alternative approaches to combat bacterial infections in dogs, cats, and horses. 

The Special Issue will select submissions on the following subjects:

  1. Characterization of disease pathways of skin diseases;
  2. Antimicrobial resistance: change in resistance patterns and alternative treatment options for bacterial infections;
  3. Feline dermatology;
  4. Equine dermatology;
  5. New technologies for detection, diagnosis, and treatment of skin diseases;
  6. Telemedicine in dermatology.

Dr. Lucia Panáková
Dr. Ina Herrmann
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • atopic disease
  • equine dermatology
  • feline dermatology

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

10 pages, 1094 KiB  
Article
Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of Lesional Skin in Canine Pemphigus Foliaceus
by Haley Starr, Elizabeth W. Howerth, Renato Leon, Robert M. Gogal, Jr. and Frane Banovic
Vet. Sci. 2024, 11(2), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci11020089 - 14 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1352
Abstract
Canine pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is considered the most common autoimmune skin disease in dogs; the mechanism of PF disease development is currently poorly understood. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the molecular mechanisms and altered biological pathways in the skin lesions of canine [...] Read more.
Canine pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is considered the most common autoimmune skin disease in dogs; the mechanism of PF disease development is currently poorly understood. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the molecular mechanisms and altered biological pathways in the skin lesions of canine PF patients. Using an RNA microarray on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, we analyzed the transcriptome of canine PF lesional skin (n = 7) compared to healthy skin (n = 5). Of the 800 genes analyzed, 420 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (p < 0.05) were found. Of those, 338 genes were significantly upregulated, including pro-inflammatory and Th17-related genes. Cell type profiling found enhancement of several cell types, such as neutrophils, T-cells, and macrophages, in PF skin compared to healthy skin. Enrichment analyses of the upregulated DEGs resulted in 78 statistically significant process networks (FDR < 0.05), including the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. In conclusion, canine PF lesional immune signature resembles previously published changes in human pemphigus skin lesions. Further studies with canine PF lesional skin using next-generation sequencing (e.g., RNA sequencing, spatial transcriptomics, etc.) and the development of canine keratinocyte/skin explant PF models are needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of this debilitating disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Veterinary Dermatology: Challenges and Advances)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1945 KiB  
Article
Unveiling Oxidative Stress-Induced Genotoxicity and Its Alleviation through Selenium and Vitamin E Therapy in Naturally Infected Cattle with Lumpy Skin Disease
by Waqas Ahmad, Adeel Sattar, Mehmood Ahmad, Muhammad Waqar Aziz, Asif Iqbal, Muhammad Yasin Tipu, Rana Muhammad Zahid Mushtaq, Naeem Rasool, Hafiz Saleet Ahmed and Muhammad Ahmad
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(11), 643; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10110643 - 07 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1532
Abstract
Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a contagious infection of cattle caused by a virus of the Poxviridae family, genus Capripoxvirus. In Pakistan, recent outbreaks have resulted in significant nationwide mortality and economic losses. A 20-day prospective cohort study was performed on sixty infected [...] Read more.
Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is a contagious infection of cattle caused by a virus of the Poxviridae family, genus Capripoxvirus. In Pakistan, recent outbreaks have resulted in significant nationwide mortality and economic losses. A 20-day prospective cohort study was performed on sixty infected cattle with the aim to evaluate LSD-induced oxidative stress’s genotoxic role and to determine the ameliorative effect of antioxidant therapy using principal component analysis (PCA) and a multivariable ordinal logistic regression model. LSDV was identified from scab samples and nodular lesions using RPO30-specific gene primers. The infected cattle were divided into control and treated groups. The animals were observed initially and finally on day 20 to evaluate the homeostatic, oxidative, and genotoxic changes. The animals in the treated group were administered a combination of selenium (Se) and vitamin E at the standard dose rate for five consecutive days. A substantial (p < 0.05) improvement in the hematological indices was observed in the treated group. The treated group also showed a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in levels of serum nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) post-therapy. The PCA at the final sampling data of the treated group showed that Principal Component (PC1 eigenvalue 1.429) was influenced by superoxide dismutase (SOD; 0.3632), catalase (CAT; 0.2906), and glutathione (GSH; 0.0816) and PC2 (eigenvalue 1.200) was influenced by CAT (0.4362), MDA (0.2056), and NO (0.0693). A significant correlation between serum NO (76%) and MDA levels (80%) was observed with genetic damage index (GDI) scores. The ordinal logistic regression model regarding the use of antioxidant therapy revealed 73.95-times (95%CI; 17.36–314.96) improvement in the GDI in treated animals. The multivariable ordinal logistic regression showed that each unit increase in NO and MDA resulted in a 13% increase in genotoxicity in infected individuals. In conclusion, our study revealed that LSD-induced oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation product causes genotoxicity in affected animals. Furthermore, the combined Se and vitamin E therapy significantly alleviated oxidative stress and genotoxicity in LSD-affected cattle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Veterinary Dermatology: Challenges and Advances)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 2012 KiB  
Article
Immunolocalization and Expression of JAK1 and JAK3 in the Skin of Dust Mite-Sensitive Beagle Dogs before and after Allergen Exposure
by Roberta Sartori, Kim Ahrens, Rachel Wilkes and Rosanna Marsella
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(8), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10080512 - 08 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1282
Abstract
Janus kinase (JAK) pathways have emerged as targets of treatment, yet localization and expression of JAK1 and JAK3 in canine atopic skin have not been studied. This study aimed to compare the localization and expression of JAK1 and JAK3 in the skin of [...] Read more.
Janus kinase (JAK) pathways have emerged as targets of treatment, yet localization and expression of JAK1 and JAK3 in canine atopic skin have not been studied. This study aimed to compare the localization and expression of JAK1 and JAK3 in the skin of atopic dogs before and after allergen exposure. Skin biopsies taken from atopic beagles sensitized to house dust mites (HDM) before (D0) and after four weeks (D28) of allergen exposure were stained. Staining was subjectively scored by examiners unaware of the source of the slides. Image J was used for the semiquantitative assessment of staining intensity. JAK1 and JAK3 staining was epidermal and dermal. JAK1 staining was cytoplasmic, primarily found in basal keratinocytes and dermal cells, while JAK 3 was nuclear (all epidermal levels and on dermal inflammatory cells). Epidermal thickness was significantly higher on D28 than on D0 (p < 0.0001). For JAK1, epidermal staining divided by epithelial thickness was significantly lower on D28 (p = 0.0002) compared to D0. For JAK3 staining, intensity in the dermis was significantly higher on D28 (p = 0.0405) compared to D0. We conclude that decreased expression of JAK1 in the epidermis and increased expression of JAK3 in the dermis of atopic dogs occur after allergen exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Veterinary Dermatology: Challenges and Advances)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1787 KiB  
Article
Sphingomyelin-Rich Lipid Extract Collar for Canine Atopic Dermatitis
by Sergi Segarra, David Sanmiguel, Eliseo Zuriaga, Sophie Leclerc, Jesús Cabañas, Estelle Seigneuric, Aurélie Miquel, Ana Vázquez and Lluís Ferrer
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(6), 389; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10060389 - 07 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2225
Abstract
The management of canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is complex, and it needs to be multimodal, combining topical and systemic therapies. Given that the currently available options are not always totally effective and might have some associated adverse effects, novel alternatives are needed. For [...] Read more.
The management of canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is complex, and it needs to be multimodal, combining topical and systemic therapies. Given that the currently available options are not always totally effective and might have some associated adverse effects, novel alternatives are needed. For this reason, a new collar for CAD was developed with 2.5% of a sphingomyelin-rich lipid extract (LE) with proven benefits for skin health. The release of the active ingredient when incorporated into the collar was tested in vitro, showing an adequate kinetic profile. Then, the efficacy and safety of the collar were assessed in 12 client-owned dogs with CAD in a pilot study. After eight weeks, the dogs experienced significant clinical improvements on the Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI)-4, Pruritus Index for Canine Atopic Dermatitis (PCAD) and Pruritus Visual Analogue Scale (PVAS) scores, without any adverse effects. Additionally, further in vitro studies were performed, indicating that this LE collar should be compatible with antiparasitic collars (with deltamethrin or imidacloprid/flumethrin) if worn simultaneously. Given the observed benefits of this LE collar, combining it with other CAD therapies could potentially allow for drug sparing, reduction in adverse effects, enhanced owner compliance, and reduced treatment costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Veterinary Dermatology: Challenges and Advances)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1649 KiB  
Article
Quality of Life of Allergic Dogs Treated with Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy—A Retrospective Study
by Tina Kotnik
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(2), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10020072 - 18 Jan 2023
Viewed by 2006
Abstract
Background: The quality of life (QoL) of dogs with canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) treated with allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) was studied to determine whether the QoL of dogs treated with ASIT (AG) improved compared with dogs not treated with ASIT (CG). Methods: The power [...] Read more.
Background: The quality of life (QoL) of dogs with canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) treated with allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT) was studied to determine whether the QoL of dogs treated with ASIT (AG) improved compared with dogs not treated with ASIT (CG). Methods: The power of the study was calculated in advance assuming that the AG would assess QoL 20% better than the CG. The CG consisted of 21 dogs with CAD and the AG of 46 dogs with CAD. Validated QoL1 (pre-treatment) and QoL2 (post-treatment) questionnaires were emailed to owners. Results: AG dogs were significantly less disturbed during mealtimes (i.e., had better appetites and scratched less during mealtimes) and caused significantly less physical discomfort to their owners (due to unpleasant odor, the impression of a dirty apartment) than CG dogs. Owners of dogs treated with ASIT were able to significantly improve their daily activities (leisure, vacation, walks, work, hunting), significantly reduce their expenses (treatment costs, veterinary costs), feel significantly less emotional distress (less guilt, powerlessness, sadness, regret, fear, anger, disgust, rage, frustration), and experience less influence on relationships with family members and friends compared to owners of dogs not treated with ASIT. Conclusions: According to our results, the quality of life of dogs treated with ASIT and their owners seemed to improve significantly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Veterinary Dermatology: Challenges and Advances)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

13 pages, 350 KiB  
Review
Primary Prevention of Canine Atopic Dermatitis: Breaking the Cycle—A Narrative Review
by Beatriz Fernandes, Susana Alves, Vanessa Schmidt, Ana Filipa Bizarro, Marta Pinto, Hugo Pereira, Joana Marto and Ana Mafalda Lourenço
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(11), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10110659 - 16 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3189
Abstract
Canine atopic dermatitis (cAD) is a common and distressing skin condition in dogs, affecting up to 30% of the canine population. It not only impacts their quality of life but also that of their owners. Like human atopic dermatitis (hAD), cAD has a [...] Read more.
Canine atopic dermatitis (cAD) is a common and distressing skin condition in dogs, affecting up to 30% of the canine population. It not only impacts their quality of life but also that of their owners. Like human atopic dermatitis (hAD), cAD has a complex pathogenesis, including genetic and environmental factors. Current treatments focus on managing clinical signs, but they can be costly and have limitations. This article emphasizes the importance of preventing cAD from developing in the first place. Understanding the role of the skin’s protective barrier is crucial, as its dysfunction plays a vital role in both hAD and cAD. hAD prevention studies have shown promising results in enhancing the skin barrier, but more research is needed to support more robust conclusions. While hAD primary prevention is currently a focal point of intensive investigation in human medicine, research on cAD primary prevention remains under-researched and almost non-existent. Pioneering effective prevention strategies for cAD holds immense potential to enhance the quality of life for both dogs and their owners. Additionally, it bears the promise of a translational impact on human research. Hence, further exploration of this crucial topic is not only relevant but also timely and imperative, warranting support and encouragement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Veterinary Dermatology: Challenges and Advances)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

16 pages, 622 KiB  
Systematic Review
Efficacy and Safety of Subcutaneous Allergen-Specific Immuno-Therapy in Horses with Allergic Cutaneous and Respiratory Diseases—A Systematic Review
by Ina Herrmann and Adrianna Jordan Sanchez
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(10), 613; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10100613 - 10 Oct 2023
Viewed by 2636
Abstract
Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only current intervention that has the ability to modify the immune response toward a tolerogenic state. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of AIT in horses with allergic diseases in a systematic manner. Three databases [...] Read more.
Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only current intervention that has the ability to modify the immune response toward a tolerogenic state. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of AIT in horses with allergic diseases in a systematic manner. Three databases were searched to identify articles reporting clinical outcomes and adverse events associated with AIT. The articles were evaluated for beneficial responses to AIT, defined as a ≥50% reduction in clinical signs, and clinical remission. Horses with respiratory diseases, urticaria, and pruritic dermatitis receiving insect monotherapy or multi-allergen AIT were included. All adverse events were graded, and analytical and confounding biases were assessed. The results showed that multi-allergen AIT had a beneficial response in 75% of horses with respiratory diseases, 88% with urticaria, and 56% with pruritic dermatitis. However, horses treated solely with insect AIT for pruritic dermatitis had a lower response rate (36%). Self-limiting local reactions were the most common adverse events, with systemic reactions grade II accounting for 11% of reported events. Analytical and confounding biases were identified as major limitations in the available studies. Further research is needed to address these biases and provide stronger evidence on the efficacy and safety of AIT in horses with allergic diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Veterinary Dermatology: Challenges and Advances)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop