The 10th Anniversary of Vaccines—Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Vaccination

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Vaccination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 1647

Special Issue Editor

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA
Interests: herpes simplex virus; antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC); pediatric vaccines; transplant patients and vaccines; cytomegalovirus; COVID-19

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2022, we will celebrate the 10th volume of the journal Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X), and it is our pleasure to invite you to join us on this wonderful occasion.

To mark this significant milestone, we are launching the Special Issue entitled “The 10th Anniversary of Vaccines—Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Vaccination”. This Special Issue will include high-quality papers on topics within the scope of the section “Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Vaccination” of Vaccines. It is our pleasure to invite you to contribute an original research paper or a comprehensive review article on a trendy or hot topic for peer review and possible publication in this journal. Co-authorship by postdoctoral fellows and students is welcome.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. The research areas may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Innate immune recognition, activation of inflammasome and cytokine responses to vaccines;
  • Route of vaccination and how it may impact vaccine responses;
  • Vaccine delivery systems;
  • Novel vaccine strategies;
  • Pathogen immune evasion strategies that overcome vaccine responses;
  • Trained immunity-based vaccines.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Betsy C. Herold
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • innate immune
  • adaptive immunity
  • vaccine responses
  • vaccine delivery systems

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1672 KiB  
Article
LAMP-1 Chimeric to HIV-1 p55Gag in the Immunization of Neonate Mice Induces an Early Germinal Center Formation and AID Expression
Vaccines 2022, 10(8), 1246; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10081246 - 03 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1409
Abstract
Neonates have a limited adaptive response of plasma cells, germinal center (GC) B cells, and T follicular helper cells (TFH). As neonatal vaccination can be an important tool for AIDS prevention, these limitations need to be overcome. Chimeric DNA vaccine encoding [...] Read more.
Neonates have a limited adaptive response of plasma cells, germinal center (GC) B cells, and T follicular helper cells (TFH). As neonatal vaccination can be an important tool for AIDS prevention, these limitations need to be overcome. Chimeric DNA vaccine encoding p55Gag HIV-1 protein conjugated with lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) has been described as immunogenic in the neonate period. Herein, we investigated the immunologic mechanisms involved in neonatal immunization with a LAMP-1/p55Gag (LAMP/Gag) DNA vaccine in a C57BL/6 mouse background. Neonatal LAMP/Gag vaccination induced strong Gag-specific T-cell response until adulthood and elevated levels of anti-Gag IgG antibodies. We also demonstrated for the first time that the immunogenicity of the neonatal period with LAMP/Gag is due to the induction of high-affinity anti-p24 IgG antibodies and long-term plasma cells. Together with that, there is the generation of early TFH cells and the formation of GC sites with the upregulation of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) enzyme mRNA and protein expression in draining lymph nodes after neonatal LAMP/Gag vaccination. These findings underscore that the LAMP-1 strategy in the chimeric vaccine could be useful to enhance antibody production even in the face of neonatal immaturity, and they contribute to the development of new vaccine approaches for other emerging pathogens at an early stage of life. Full article
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