Advances in Skin Immune-Mediated Disease

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 14363

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Medicine, University of Verona, Piazzale A. Stefani 1, I-37126 Verona, Italy
Interests: psoriasis; psoriatic arthritis; atopic dermatitis; immunopharmacology; skin biology; skin immune system; skin and internal diseases
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Guest Editor
Dermatology Department, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Interests: skin immunology; inflammatory skin disorders; psoriasis; atopic dermatitis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The advances in the understanding of pathophysiology in immune-mediated disease enhanced the capability in identifying new therapeutic targets or novel therapeutic strategies. Common inflammatory skin disorders including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis had significant benefits from the intense research on immune mechanisms involved in their pathogenesis. Indeed, an expanded therapeutic armamentarium of selective agents blocking soluble cytokines, cytokine receptors, or intracellular signal transducers was developed providing multiple therapeutic agents having different targets. For other skin diseases with a critical immune component a new era for their therapeutic management is approaching or has been barely started. This special issue aims to collect recent findings on the identification of therapeutic targets and the development of immune-targeted therapies for the treatment of immune-mediated skin conditions, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, lichen planus, alopecia areata, bullous diseases, lupus, and scleroderma. We are hopeful that this special issue with a focus on the role of inflammation in skin disease and the therapeutic relevance of targeting immune mediators, will serve as a valuable tool in expanding the reader's knowledge on the complexity of certain skin diseases and the significant role played by the immune system.

Prof. Dr. Giampiero Girolomoni
Dr. Andrea Chiricozzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 170 KiB  
Editorial
Shedding Light on Novel Pathogenic and Therapeutic Aspects Related to Immune-Mediated Skin Diseases
by Andrea Chiricozzi and Giampiero Girolomoni
Vaccines 2023, 11(4), 761; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11040761 - 29 Mar 2023
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Abstract
Great advances in the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms characterizing various immune-mediated skin diseases have been achieved [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Skin Immune-Mediated Disease)

Research

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19 pages, 2041 KiB  
Article
Allelic Variants of HLA-C Upstream Region, PSORS1C3, MICA, TNFA and Genes Involved in Epidermal Homeostasis and Barrier Function Influence the Clinical Response to Anti-IL-12/IL-23 Treatment of Patients with Psoriasis
by Martina Morelli, Marco Galluzzo, Claudia Scarponi, Stefania Madonna, Giovanni Luca Scaglione, Giampiero Girolomoni, Marina Talamonti, Luca Bianchi and Cristina Albanesi
Vaccines 2022, 10(11), 1977; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10111977 - 21 Nov 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2024
Abstract
Several biologic therapies have been developed to treat moderate-to-severe psoriasis, with patients exhibiting different clinical benefits, possibly due to the heterogeneity of pathogenic processes underlying their conditions. Ustekinumab targets the IL-12/IL-23-p40 subunit and inhibits type-1 and type-17 T-cell responses. Although ustekinumab is effective [...] Read more.
Several biologic therapies have been developed to treat moderate-to-severe psoriasis, with patients exhibiting different clinical benefits, possibly due to the heterogeneity of pathogenic processes underlying their conditions. Ustekinumab targets the IL-12/IL-23-p40 subunit and inhibits type-1 and type-17 T-cell responses. Although ustekinumab is effective as both short- and long-term treatment, therapeutic response varies considerably among patients. Ustekinumab biosimilars will be commercialized in the very next future, likely broadening the use of this drug in the treatment of psoriasis patients. Our pharmacogenomic study evaluated the influence of 417 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in psoriasis-risk alleles on the clinical response to ustekinumab in a cohort of 152 patients affected by moderate-to-severe plaque-type psoriasis. Differences in SNP pattern characterizing HLA-Cw6+ or HLA-Cw6 patients, showing high or low responses to ustekinumab, were also analysed. We identified twelve SNPs in HLA-C upstream region (rs12189871, rs4406273, rs9348862 and rs9368670), PSORS1C3 (rs1265181), MICA (rs2523497), LCE3A-B intergenic region (rs12030223, rs6701730), CDSN (rs1042127, rs4713436), CCHCR1 (rs2073719) and in TNFA (rs1800610) genes associated with excellent response to ustekinumab. We also found that HLA-Cw6+ and HLA-Cw6 patients carried out distinct patterns of SNPs associated with different clinical responses. The assessment of HLA-C alleles, together with other genetic variants, could be helpful for defining patients who better benefit from anti-IL-12/IL-23 therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Skin Immune-Mediated Disease)
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Review

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13 pages, 284 KiB  
Review
Consistency of Bacterial Triggers in the Pathogenesis of Hidradenitis Suppurativa
by Elia Rosi, Prisca Guerra, Gianmarco Silvi, Giulia Nunziati, Ilaria Scandagli, Antonella Di Cesare and Francesca Prignano
Vaccines 2023, 11(1), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11010179 - 13 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1972
Abstract
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is an inflammatory skin disease whose pathogenesis remains poorly defined. Over the past decades, the bacterial role in HS patients has been a focus of research. According to the literature, the HS skin (and probably gut) bacterial composition is different [...] Read more.
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is an inflammatory skin disease whose pathogenesis remains poorly defined. Over the past decades, the bacterial role in HS patients has been a focus of research. According to the literature, the HS skin (and probably gut) bacterial composition is different to that of healthy controls. To date, a key question is whether compositional changes in the microbial populations are responsible for the development of HS (primum movens), or only secondarily reflect the ongoing inflammatory process. The great diversity of methodologies that have been used to study microbial role in HS have led to an accumulation of conflicting results. Thus, in view of these considerations, the aim of this article is to provide the reader with an overview about different hypotheses proposed to explain the bacterial role in HS pathogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Skin Immune-Mediated Disease)

Other

9 pages, 470 KiB  
Brief Report
Autoinflammation in Syndromic Hidradenitis Suppurativa: The Role of AIM2
by Chiara Moltrasio, Rachele Cagliani, Manuela Sironi, Mario Clerici, Chiara Pontremoli, Carlo Alberto Maronese, Paola Maura Tricarico, Sergio Crovella and Angelo Valerio Marzano
Vaccines 2023, 11(1), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11010162 - 11 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1480
Abstract
Background: AIM2 is a key cytoplasmatic pathogen-sensor that detects foreign DNA from viruses and bacteria; it can also recognize damaged or anomalous presence of DNA, promoting inflammasome assembly and activation with the secretion of IL-1β, thus sustaining a chronic inflammatory state, potentially leading [...] Read more.
Background: AIM2 is a key cytoplasmatic pathogen-sensor that detects foreign DNA from viruses and bacteria; it can also recognize damaged or anomalous presence of DNA, promoting inflammasome assembly and activation with the secretion of IL-1β, thus sustaining a chronic inflammatory state, potentially leading to the onset of autoinflammatory skin diseases. Given the implication of the IL-1β pathway in the pathogenesis of syndromic hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), an autoinflammatory immune-mediated skin condition, the potential involvement of AIM2 was investigated. Methods: Sequencing of the whole coding region of the AIM2 gene, comprising 5′- and 3′ UTR and a region upstream of the first exon of ~800 bp was performed in twelve syndromic HS patients. Results: Six out of twelve syndromic HS patients carried a heterozygous variant c.−208 A ≥ C (rs41264459), located on the promoter region of the AIM2 gene, with a minor allele frequency of 0.25, which is much higher than that reported in 1000 G and GnomAD (0.075 and 0.094, respectively). The same variant was found at a lower allelic frequency in sporadic HS and isolated pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) (0.125 and 0.065, respectively). Conclusion: Our data suggest that this variant might play a role in susceptibility to develop syndromic forms of HS but not to progress to sporadic HS and PG. Furthermore, epigenetic and/or somatic variations could affect AIM2 expression leading to different, context-dependent responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Skin Immune-Mediated Disease)
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5 pages, 35387 KiB  
Case Report
Sweet Syndrome Following SARS-CoV2 Vaccination
by Maria Efenesia Baffa, Roberto Maglie, Neri Giovannozzi, Francesca Montefusco, Stefano Senatore, Daniela Massi and Emiliano Antiga
Vaccines 2021, 9(11), 1212; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9111212 - 20 Oct 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 7249
Abstract
Vaccines are today considered one of the most effective means against the Sars-CoV-2 pandemic. The BNT162b2 vaccine by Pfizer/BioNTech has been massively administered throughout the globe; since its approval, a wide spectrum of cutaneous reactions has been reported. Here we report the case [...] Read more.
Vaccines are today considered one of the most effective means against the Sars-CoV-2 pandemic. The BNT162b2 vaccine by Pfizer/BioNTech has been massively administered throughout the globe; since its approval, a wide spectrum of cutaneous reactions has been reported. Here we report the case of a 52-year-old Caucasian male who presented with an acute febrile eruption that arose 72 h after the first dose of the BNT162b2 vaccine. The clinicopathological findings were consistent with Sweet’s syndrome. The short latency time suggested a possible role of the vaccine in triggering Sweet’s syndrome in this case. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Skin Immune-Mediated Disease)
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