Tumor Vaccine Development, Immune-Based Therapies and Immune Markers

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 1589

Special Issue Editors

Scientific Direction, Candiolo Cancer Institute (FPO-IRCCS), Candiolo, Italy
Interests: head and neck cancer; immunotherapy; translational research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Italy
Interests: breast cancer; immunotherapy; translational research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

In recent years, there has been substantial progress in the development of new therapeutic strategies against tumors. The significance of immunotherapy in this field is increasing, and the importance of understanding the interaction between tumor cells and the immune system is dramatically growing.

A deeper understanding of the multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms leading to tumor escape is paving the way for the development of an incredible number of new immunotherapies.

Similarly, the enormous ongoing effort to identify reliable markers of response will enable personalized therapies.

Finally, after many disappointing experiences in the past, greater knowledge of the tumor microenvironment and of the immune response mechanisms have improved the expectations which can be placed on anti-tumor vaccines.

Indeed, tumor vaccination has swiftly expanded over the last few years to incorporate in vitro approaches such as T-cell transfer therapy, in situ vaccination, and the use of oncolytic viruses, all with the purpose of inducing antitumor response. 

In combination with the other strategies, including chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies, radiation therapy, and different immunotherapeutic approaches involving immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, cancer vaccines will become soon an important new tool in fighting cancer. 

This Special issue is focused on the recent scientific research, progress, and achievements in the fields of immunotherapy against cancer, the effectiveness of cancer vaccines on tumors and tumor microenvironment. We invite and welcome all scholars to contribute with original articles, systematic reviews, short communications, and other types of articles on related topics are welcome.

Dr. Marco Carlo Merlano
Dr. Ornella Garrone
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • new immunotherapy strategies
  • anticancer vaccines
  • tumor microenvironment-associated markers of response
  • mechanisms of primary and secondary immune resistance

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 2101 KiB  
Article
Cemiplimab in Ultra-Octogenarian Patients with Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma: The Real-Life Experience of a Tertiary Referral Center
Vaccines 2023, 11(9), 1500; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11091500 - 18 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1012
Abstract
Background: The incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is rapidly increasing, paralleling the aging of the population. cSCC predominantly affects chronically sun-exposed areas, such as the head and neck region. At our tertiary center, a multidisciplinary approach to non-melanoma skin cancer is [...] Read more.
Background: The incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is rapidly increasing, paralleling the aging of the population. cSCC predominantly affects chronically sun-exposed areas, such as the head and neck region. At our tertiary center, a multidisciplinary approach to non-melanoma skin cancer is provided for locally advanced cSCC. Methods: We retrospectively revised all patients with locally advanced/metastatic cSCC treated with anti-PD1 antibody (Cemiplimab) at our Institution from January 2020 to March 2023 (minimum follow-up of 4 months on treatment). Results: Overall, we consecutively treated 20 ultra-octogenarian patients, of whom 15 were males and 5 were females (median age: 86.9 years). Despite age, a median number of concomitant drugs, and comorbidities, efficacy, and safety were superimposable with the available literature. No patients reported treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or higher. Grade 2 adverse events were reported in 25% of patients. Overall, the response rate was 65%, with 50% partial responses and 20% long-lasting stable disease. The median duration of response was 14 months. The G8 elderly score was assessed in all patients, and the median score was 12 (range 9–14). Conclusions: Among ultra-octogenarian patients, a clinical benefit from Cemiplimab was obtained in most, including tumor shrinkage and pain relief. Cemiplimab confirmed its effectiveness in elderly patients in a real-life setting, with no new safety concerns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tumor Vaccine Development, Immune-Based Therapies and Immune Markers)
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