Focus on Human Papillomavirus Vaccines

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Human Papillomavirus Vaccines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 9392

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: HPV; lower genital tract disease; vaccination
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Guest Editor
1. Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: HPV; lower genital tract disease; vaccination
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human papillomavirus infection is the main diffuse sexually transmitted disease and represents the main cause of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, cervical cancer, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer in the female population. Recently, several trials have investigated the systemic and local immunological pathway involved in HPV infection and host response in order to evaluate the risk factors involved in the persistent infection and the progression to high-grade CIN. In addition, it is interesting to evaluate the factors that cause the spontaneous regression of cervical lesions.

We are pleased to invite you to participate in this Special Issue in order to enrich this field of research with your experience and contribute to the understanding of HPV infection of the female lower genital tract. The aim is to have a collection of at least 10 articles, and the Special Issue may be printed in book form if this number is reached. In this Special Issue, original research articles, pre-clinical and clinical trials, meta-analyses, and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: immunology, obstetrics and gynecology, virology, and biochemistry.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Mattia Dominoni
Dr. Barbara Gardella
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Human Papillomavirus
  • CIN
  • microbiota
  • vain
  • VIN
  • immunology

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 259 KiB  
Article
Attitudes towards HPV Vaccination Policy Strategies to Improve Adolescent Vaccination Coverage among Pediatric Providers in New York State
by Jana Shaw, Samantha Hanley, Elana Sitnik, Winter Berry, Steven Blatt, Michael Seserman and Margaret K. Formica
Vaccines 2023, 11(8), 1359; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11081359 - 12 Aug 2023
Viewed by 936
Abstract
Pediatric providers’ stances on HPV vaccination-related policies are largely unknown. To gain insight into pediatric providers’ perspectives and potential recommendations for directed policy, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of the American Academy of Pediatrics members in New York. Almost all providers expressed confidence [...] Read more.
Pediatric providers’ stances on HPV vaccination-related policies are largely unknown. To gain insight into pediatric providers’ perspectives and potential recommendations for directed policy, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of the American Academy of Pediatrics members in New York. Almost all providers expressed confidence in discussing the HPV vaccine with patients (98.6%, n = 72). Among common barriers to vaccination, providers listed parental safety concerns (n = 60, 82.2%), vaccination not being required for school entry (n = 59, 80.8%), and moral opposition to vaccination (n = 48, 65.8%). Among all respondents, 29 (39.7%), 13 (17.8%), and 2 (2.7%) agreed the vaccine should be required for middle, high, and tertiary school entry, respectively. Support for pharmacist-provision of the vaccine varied, with 31 (42.5%) providers expressing support. Most providers supported adolescent self-consent to vaccination, (n = 67, 91.8%). Providers continued to encounter barriers to HPV vaccination and indicated support of HPV vaccination mandates for school entry, pharmacist provision of the vaccine, and adolescent self-consent to vaccination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Focus on Human Papillomavirus Vaccines)
12 pages, 1469 KiB  
Article
Incomplete HPV Vaccination among Individuals Aged 27–45 Years in the United States: A Mixed-Effect Analysis of Individual and Contextual Factors
by Victor Adekanmbi, Fangjian Guo, Christine D. Hsu, Yong Shan, Yong-Fang Kuo and Abbey B. Berenson
Vaccines 2023, 11(4), 820; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11040820 - 10 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1497
Abstract
Background: In the United States, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is approved for use in individuals up to age 45. Individuals 15 years and older require three doses of the vaccine to complete the recommended dosing series. Incomplete HPV vaccination rates (i.e., one [...] Read more.
Background: In the United States, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is approved for use in individuals up to age 45. Individuals 15 years and older require three doses of the vaccine to complete the recommended dosing series. Incomplete HPV vaccination rates (i.e., one or two doses) among those over age 26, however, remain high. This study examined the independent effects of individual- and neighborhood-level factors on incomplete HPV vaccination rates in the United States (U.S.) among those aged 27–45 years. Methods: This retrospective cohort study used administrative data from Optum’s de-identified Clinformatics® Data Mart Database to identify individuals aged 27–45 years who received one or more doses of HPV vaccine between July 2019 and June 2022. Multilevel multivariable logistic regression models were applied to the data on 7662 individuals identified as being fully or partially vaccinated against HPV, nested within 3839 neighborhoods across the U.S. Results: Approximately half of the patients in this study (52.93%) were not completely vaccinated against HPV. After adjusting for all other covariates in the final model, being older than 30 years old decreased the odds of not completing the HPV vaccine series. Participants living in South-region neighborhoods of the U.S. had enhanced odds of not completing the vaccine series compared with those residing in Northeast-region neighborhoods (aOR 1.21; 95% CrI 1.03–1.42). There was significant clustering of incomplete HPV vaccination rates at the neighborhood level. Conclusions: This study revealed that individual- and neighborhood-level factors were associated with the risk of not completing the HPV vaccine series among individuals aged 27–45 years in the U.S. Interventions to improve HPV vaccination series completion rates for this age group should take into consideration both individual and contextual factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Focus on Human Papillomavirus Vaccines)
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14 pages, 281 KiB  
Article
Predictor of HPV Vaccination Uptake among Foreign-Born College Students in the U.S.: An Exploration of the Role of Acculturation and the Health Belief Model
by Fahad T. Alsulami, Jesus Sanchez, Silvia E. Rabionet, Ioana Popovici and Mohamed A. Baraka
Vaccines 2023, 11(2), 422; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11020422 - 12 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2081
Abstract
Objective: to measure the HPV vaccination rate and knowledge about HPV and its vaccine among foreign-born college students; additionally, to measure the effect of acculturation and HBM constructs on the HPV vaccination behavior among foreign-born college students. Methods: a cross-sectional design with a [...] Read more.
Objective: to measure the HPV vaccination rate and knowledge about HPV and its vaccine among foreign-born college students; additionally, to measure the effect of acculturation and HBM constructs on the HPV vaccination behavior among foreign-born college students. Methods: a cross-sectional design with a non-probability sample of foreign-born college students was collected via a web-based self-administered survey that measured the HPV vaccination rate, assessed knowledge about HPV and its vaccine, and evaluated the effect of acculturation and HBM constructs on HPV vaccination behavior among foreign-born college students. Results: Foreign-born college students had moderate knowledge about HPV and the HPV vaccine, and about 63% were HPV-vaccinated. Perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and cues to action were significantly associated with the HPV vaccination behavior, while knowledge levels about HPV and the HPV vaccine and acculturation levels were not significantly associated with the HPV vaccination behavior of foreign-born college students. Conclusions: The current study shows a moderate vaccination rate and moderate knowledge about HPV and its vaccine among foreign-born college students. Additionally, vaccination campaigns need to increase awareness about the susceptibility to acquiring HPV and minimize the barriers to receiving the vaccine to increase the HPV vaccination rate among foreign-born college students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Focus on Human Papillomavirus Vaccines)
15 pages, 1166 KiB  
Article
Awareness, Acceptance, and Associated Factors of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Parents of Daughters in Hadiya Zone, Southern Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Yilma Markos Larebo, Legesse Tesfaye Elilo, Desta Erkalo Abame, Denebo Ersulo Akiso, Solomon Gebre Bawore, Abebe Alemu Anshebo and Natarajan Gopalan
Vaccines 2022, 10(12), 1988; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10121988 - 23 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2153
Abstract
Introduction: Human papillomavirus infections are the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease among women worldwide. Cervical cancer is the second-most frequent disease worldwide in terms of incidence and mortality, and it is primarily responsible for fatalities in low- to middle-income nations, including Ethiopia. Objective: [...] Read more.
Introduction: Human papillomavirus infections are the most prevalent sexually transmitted disease among women worldwide. Cervical cancer is the second-most frequent disease worldwide in terms of incidence and mortality, and it is primarily responsible for fatalities in low- to middle-income nations, including Ethiopia. Objective: To assess awareness, acceptance, and associated factors of the human papillomavirus vaccine among parents of daughters in the Hadiya zone, southern Ethiopia. Methods: From November to December 2021, a community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in the Hadiya zone among parents with daughters in the zone. The study respondents were chosen using a two-stage sampling technique from parents with a 9–14-year-old daughter. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. For analysis, the data were entered into Epidata version 3.1 and exported to SPSS version 25. Variables with a p-value less than 0.25 in the bivariate analysis were transferred to multivariable analysis. A logistic regression model was applied to forecast the association between the predictor and outcome variables. Statistical significance was considered at a 0.05 p-value. Results: The study showed that the overall acceptance of parents to vaccinate their daughters with HPV vaccination was 450 (84.9%). Parents of daughters of male sex (AOR: 0.407; 95%CI: 0.221, 0.748), who had only one daughter (AOR: 2.122; 95%CI: 1.221, 3.685), whose daughter(s) attended a government school (AOR: 0.476; 95%CI: 0.263, 0.861), who had poor knowledge (AOR: 0.532; 95%CI: 0.293, 0.969) and who had a negative attitude (AOR: 0.540; 95%CI: 0.299, 0.977) were discovered to have a strong correlation. Conclusion: This study found that there was a high level of parental acceptance; attitudes and knowledge about the HPV vaccine are significant in determining their intentions to vaccinate their daughter. Authorities in high-risk areas for cervical cancer incidence should plan and implement strategies by providing health information regarding human papillomavirus vaccination with an emphasis on raising community awareness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Focus on Human Papillomavirus Vaccines)
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Review

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26 pages, 2318 KiB  
Review
Advancing Immunotherapies for HPV-Related Cancers: Exploring Novel Vaccine Strategies and the Influence of Tumor Microenvironment
by Anna Jéssica Duarte Silva, Ingrid Andrêssa de Moura, Marco Antonio Turiah Machado da Gama, Lígia Rosa Sales Leal, Samara Sousa de Pinho, Benigno Cristofer Flores Espinoza, Daffany Luana dos Santos, Vanessa Emanuelle Pereira Santos, Matheus Gardini Amancio Marques De Sena, Maria Da Conceição Viana Invenção, Larissa Silva de Macêdo, Pedro Luiz de França Neto and Antonio Carlos de Freitas
Vaccines 2023, 11(8), 1354; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11081354 - 11 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2180
Abstract
The understanding of the relationship between immunological responses and cancers, especially those related to HPV, has allowed for the study and development of therapeutic vaccines against these neoplasias. There is a growing number of studies about the composition and influence of the tumor [...] Read more.
The understanding of the relationship between immunological responses and cancers, especially those related to HPV, has allowed for the study and development of therapeutic vaccines against these neoplasias. There is a growing number of studies about the composition and influence of the tumor microenvironment (TME) in the progression or establishment of the most varied types of cancer. Hence, it has been possible to structure immunotherapy approaches based on therapeutic vaccines that are even more specific and directed to components of TME and the immune response associated with tumors. Among these components are dendritic cells (DCs), which are the main professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) already studied in therapy strategies for HPV-related cancers. On the other hand, tumor-associated macrophages are also potential targets since the profile present in tumor infiltrates, M1 or M2, influences the prognosis of some types of cancer. These two cell types can be targets for therapy or immunomodulation. In this context, our review aims to provide an overview of immunotherapy strategies for HPV-positive tumors, such as cervical and head and neck cancers, pointing to TME immune cells as promising targets for these approaches. This review also explores the potential of immunotherapy in cancer treatment, including checkpoint inhibitors, cytokine immunotherapies, immunotherapy vaccines, and cell therapies. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of understanding the TME and its effect on the design and achievement of immunotherapeutic methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Focus on Human Papillomavirus Vaccines)
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