Health Technology Assessment (HTA) of New Vaccines and New Target Groups and Impact Evaluation and Effectiveness of Current Vaccination Strategies 2.0

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Human Vaccines and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 5822

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, 50134 Florence, Italy
Interests: epidemiology and prevention of infectious diseases; health technology assessment (HTA) and pharmaeconomic evaluations; seroepidemiology studies of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, 50134 Florence, Italy
Interests: epidemiology and prevention of infectious diseases; health technology assessment of new vaccines and new vaccination strategies; seroepidemiology studies of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases; public-health policies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, 50134 Florence, Italy
Interests: epidemiology and prevention of infectious diseases; surveillance of infectious diseases; seroepidemiology studies of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases; impact assessment of vaccination strategies in the general population and risk groups (healthcare workers, pregnant women, diabetic patients, asplenic patients, adolescents)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

In the current global health scenario, there is a strong need for evidence-based choices to rationalize the use of limited available resources and maximize results in terms of health, especially for prevention activities.

The use of clear, robust, and shared criteria to provide the most effective and efficient prevention interventions against infectious diseases is summarized into multidisciplinary analysis, such as the approach of health technology assessment (HTA). In addition, when a prevention program is implemented, it is also necessary to assess the impact of immunization activities on the target population.

The aim of the current Special Issue is to collect HTA studies on vaccination that can provide careful and in-depth analysis of both epidemiological/clinical data and organization vaccination practices, also including the economic evaluations (budget–impact, cost–effectiveness, cost–utility, and cost–benefit analyses) of new vaccines (such as RSV and SARS-CoV-2) or new vaccination strategies.

Moreover, this Special Issue focuses on the impact assessment of vaccination programs already in place with the aim to provide evidence-based research on the effectiveness of vaccination programs.

Particularly, to measure the impact of prevention activities, research articles on the impact of vaccination programs analyzing the reduction of notifications, hospitalizations, or deaths due to vaccine-preventable diseases (measles, rubella, varicella, pneumococcal and meningococcal diseases, HPV-related diseases, influenza, rotavirus, and herpes zoster) would be appreciated. Monitoring studies of vaccination coverage trends over time and seroepidemiological studies are also welcome to support health authorities in reassessing their national immunization plans (NIP), considering new vaccination strategies for vaccines already included in the NIP.

The final objective is to give voice to all vaccination practices that, at an acceptable and sustainable cost, can improve the quality of life of all people, from children to adolescents, adults and the elderly, including risk groups (healthcare workers, pregnant women, adolescents and the elderly, and people with comorbidities such as diabetes and asplenia).

Dr. Sara Boccalini
Prof. Dr. Paolo Bonanni
Dr. Angela Bechini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vaccine
  • vaccination strategies
  • prevention
  • health technology assessment
  • vaccine effectiveness
  • cost-effectiveness analysis
  • budget-impact analysis
  • vaccination coverage
  • seroprevalence

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 686 KiB  
Article
The Potential Economic Impact of the Updated COVID-19 mRNA Fall 2023 Vaccines in Japan
by Kelly Fust, Keya Joshi, Ekkehard Beck, Michael Maschio, Michele Kohli, Amy Lee, Yuriko Hagiwara, Nicolas Van de Velde and Ataru Igarashi
Vaccines 2024, 12(4), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines12040434 - 18 Apr 2024
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Abstract
This analysis estimates the economic and clinical impact of a Moderna updated COVID-19 mRNA Fall 2023 vaccine for adults ≥18 years in Japan. A previously developed Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered (SEIR) model with a one-year analytic time horizon (September 2023–August 2024) and consequences decision tree were [...] Read more.
This analysis estimates the economic and clinical impact of a Moderna updated COVID-19 mRNA Fall 2023 vaccine for adults ≥18 years in Japan. A previously developed Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered (SEIR) model with a one-year analytic time horizon (September 2023–August 2024) and consequences decision tree were used to estimate symptomatic infections, COVID-19 related hospitalizations, deaths, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for a Moderna updated Fall 2023 vaccine versus no additional vaccination, and versus a Pfizer–BioNTech updated mRNA Fall 2023 vaccine. The Moderna vaccine is predicted to prevent 7.2 million symptomatic infections, 272,100 hospitalizations and 25,600 COVID-19 related deaths versus no vaccine. In the base case (healthcare perspective), the ICER was ¥1,300,000/QALY gained ($9400 USD/QALY gained). Sensitivity analyses suggest results are most affected by COVID-19 incidence, initial vaccine effectiveness (VE), and VE waning against infection. Assuming the relative VE between both bivalent vaccines apply to updated Fall 2023 vaccines, the base case suggests the Moderna version will prevent an additional 1,100,000 symptomatic infections, 27,100 hospitalizations, and 2600 deaths compared to the Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine. The updated Moderna vaccine is expected to be highly cost-effective at a ¥5 million willingness-to-pay threshold across a wide range of scenarios. Full article
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16 pages, 805 KiB  
Article
Return on Investment (ROI) of Three Vaccination Programmes in Italy: HPV at 12 Years, Herpes Zoster in Adults, and Influenza in the Elderly
by Marco Barbieri and Sara Boccalini
Vaccines 2023, 11(5), 924; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11050924 - 30 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1567
Abstract
The calculation of the return on investment (ROI) allows the estimation of the opportunity cost of a series of interventions and can therefore help to make allocative choices. The objective of this study is to estimate the ROI of three vaccinations (HPV for [...] Read more.
The calculation of the return on investment (ROI) allows the estimation of the opportunity cost of a series of interventions and can therefore help to make allocative choices. The objective of this study is to estimate the ROI of three vaccinations (HPV for adolescents, HZ for adults, and influenza for the elderly) in the Italian context, considering the impact of increasing vaccination coverage based on target objectives of the National Immunization Plan (PNPV) 2017–2019 and accounting for different eligibility criteria of each vaccination. Three separate static cohort models were constructed, including the eligible population for these vaccinations on the basis of the PNPV 2017–2019 and following this population until death (lifetime horizon) or until vaccination waning. Each model compares the level of investment at current vaccine coverage rates (current VCRs scenario) with that of optimal NIP target VCRs with a non-vaccination scenario. The ROI for HPV vaccination was the highest among the programs compared and was always above 1 (range: 1.4–3.58), while lower values were estimated for influenza vaccination in the elderly (range 0.48–0.53) and for vaccination against HZ (range: 0.09–0.27). Our analysis showed that a significant proportion of savings generated by vaccination programs occurred outside the NHS perspective and might often not be estimated with other forms of economic evaluation. Full article
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21 pages, 2432 KiB  
Article
Cost-Effectiveness of Vaccination of Older Adults with an MF59®-Adjuvanted Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Compared to Standard-Dose and High-Dose Vaccines in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden
by Jorge Jacob, Tor Biering-Sørensen, Lars Holger Ehlers, Christina H. Edwards, Kristin Greve-Isdahl Mohn, Anna Nilsson, Jonas Hjelmgren, Wenkang Ma, Yuvraj Sharma, Emanuele Ciglia and Joaquin Mould-Quevedo
Vaccines 2023, 11(4), 753; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11040753 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2978
Abstract
Individuals aged 65 years and above are at increased risk of complications and death from influenza compared with any other age group. Enhanced vaccines, as the MF59®-adjuvanted quadrivalent influenza vaccine (aQIV) and the high-dose quadrivalent influenza vaccine (HD-QIV), provide increased protection [...] Read more.
Individuals aged 65 years and above are at increased risk of complications and death from influenza compared with any other age group. Enhanced vaccines, as the MF59®-adjuvanted quadrivalent influenza vaccine (aQIV) and the high-dose quadrivalent influenza vaccine (HD-QIV), provide increased protection for older adults in comparison to the traditional standard-dose quadrivalent influenza vaccines (SD-QIV). This study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of aQIV compared to SD-QIV and HD-QIV in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden for adults aged ≥65 years. A static decision tree model was used to evaluate costs and outcomes of different vaccination strategies from healthcare payer and societal perspectives. This model projects that compared to SD-QIV, vaccination with aQIV could prevent a combined total of 18,772 symptomatic influenza infections, 925 hospitalizations, and 161 deaths in one influenza season across the three countries. From a healthcare payer perspective, the incremental costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained with aQIV versus SD-QIV were EUR 10,170/QALY in Denmark, EUR 12,515/QALY in Norway, and EUR 9894/QALY in Sweden. The aQIV was cost saving compared with HD-QIV. This study found that introducing aQIV to the entire population aged ≥65 years may contribute to reducing the disease and economic burden associated with influenza in these countries. Full article
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