Urinary Stones Management

A special issue of Uro (ISSN 2673-4397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2022) | Viewed by 9755

Special Issue Editor

Department of Urology, “Agostino Gemelli” Academic Hospital Foundation, IRCCS, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome, Italy
Interests: urinary stones; endourology; renal cancer; clinical care

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urolithiasis is a relevant disease worldwide and its incidence has increasing in the last few years. Endourology, thanks to the technical improvements and the progresses in mini-invasive surgery, has become a relevant part of urological surgery, and endourological procedures are widely performed in all Urology departments. There are some milestones in the management of the disease, such as shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), rigid and flexible ureteroscopy (URS, RIRS), percutaneous nephrolitotomy (PCNL) and more recent developments as combined procedures (ECIRS) and robotic and laparoscopic surgery.

The miniaturization of instruments, the possibility of using new highly effective laser, the application of robotic mini-invasive surgery for urinary stones, the adoption of single use endoscopes, the prevention of infective complications after endourological procedure are some of the recent relevant topics of interest in urological research regarding urolithiasis and endourology.

Eventually, a more detailed focus on prevention in patients with recurrent urinary stones and the primary role for metabolic evaluation are further confirmation that urolithiasis has to be evaluated by urologists not only from the surgical point of view.

Finally, the recent pandemic emergency has dramatically changed the management of many benign conditions, such as urinary stones with various effects on clinical presentation and consequences on treatment decisions.

The aim of this Special Issue is to focus on urinary stones management both in terms of clinical and surgical practice in order to evaluate current evidence and to set the basis for future research in this crucial field of urological practice.  

Dr. Nazario Foschi
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Mini-Micro PCNL
  • PCNL positions
  • PCNL access
  • ECIRS
  • SuperPulsed Laser
  • robotic pielolithotomy
  • Ureteroscopy (URS)
  • single use endoscope
  • stone culture
  • metabolic evaluation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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5 pages, 234 KiB  
Commentary
To What Extent Does Frailty Influence the Risk of Developing Urolithiasis?
Uro 2022, 2(1), 1-5; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro2010001 - 08 Jan 2022
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Abstract
Urolithiasis has become more prevalent in recent years, given the rapid rise of the global geriatric population. Although factors such as ethnicity, dietary and fluid intake, co-morbidity status and age have been associated with increased incidence of urolithiasis, the links between frailty status [...] Read more.
Urolithiasis has become more prevalent in recent years, given the rapid rise of the global geriatric population. Although factors such as ethnicity, dietary and fluid intake, co-morbidity status and age have been associated with increased incidence of urolithiasis, the links between frailty status and risks of developing urolithiasis are not yet known. In this commentary, we will explore the scale and significance of this relationship based on emerging evidence. We will review the plausible factors on how a more severe frailty status may be significantly associated with greater risks of developing urolithiasis. We will also discuss the strategies that may help to lower the incidence of urolithiasis in older and frail individuals. We hope our article will bring greater awareness on this issue and motivate further research initiatives evaluating the relationship between frailty and urolithiasis, as well as holistic prevention strategies to lower the risks of developing urolithiasis within this vulnerable population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urinary Stones Management)
4 pages, 804 KiB  
Case Report
Ureteric Stone-Related Escherichia coli Bacteraemia Associated with Spondylodiscitis
Uro 2021, 1(4), 198-201; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro1040021 - 11 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4350
Abstract
Escherichia coli (E. coli)-related urosepsis associated with a ureteric stone has been shown to cause a systemic bacteraemia that can spread to other parts of the body. Hematogenous spread of infection is the most common cause of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. A 74-year-old [...] Read more.
Escherichia coli (E. coli)-related urosepsis associated with a ureteric stone has been shown to cause a systemic bacteraemia that can spread to other parts of the body. Hematogenous spread of infection is the most common cause of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. A 74-year-old female presented with acute left-sided flank pain and was found to have an obstructing 9 mm distal ureteric stone. After initial management involving ureteric stent insertion, the patient deteriorated and developed an E. coli associated bacteraemia, which proved difficult to treat. Further investigations revealed a subsequent spondylodiscitis, which required a 6-week course of antibiotics and no additional intervention. This case presents the likely association of stone-related bacteraemia, complicated by urinary tract instrumentation leading to spondylodiscitis, and demonstrates the importance of clinicians’ awareness of other causes of unresolving sepsis in an elderly patient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urinary Stones Management)
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6 pages, 1524 KiB  
Case Report
Novel Variant in CLDN16: A Further Step in the Diagnosis of Familial Hypomagnesemia with Hypercalciuria and Nephrocalcinosis—A Case Report
Uro 2021, 1(3), 76-81; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro1030011 - 30 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) is a rare tubulopathy characterized by renal loss of calcium and magnesium leading to progressive renal failure. The disorder is caused by variants to the tight junction proteins claudin-16 and -19. While rare, this disorder causes [...] Read more.
Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) is a rare tubulopathy characterized by renal loss of calcium and magnesium leading to progressive renal failure. The disorder is caused by variants to the tight junction proteins claudin-16 and -19. While rare, this disorder causes a significant burden to patients based on its clinical manifestations of various electrolyte abnormalities, nephrocalcinosis, and early progression to renal failure. In this report we describe the diagnosis of a novel variant of CLDN16 which clinically presented with severe hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, nephrocalcinosis, and renal failure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urinary Stones Management)
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