Survey and Assessment of Knowledge about Adolescents’ Sexuality

A special issue of Uro (ISSN 2673-4397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 5692

Special Issue Editors

Urology Department, A.O.R.N. A.Cardarelli, Naples, Italy
Interests: mini-invasive surgery; bladder cancer; prostate cancer; kidney cancer; urinary stones; andrology
Urology Department, A.O.R.N. A.Cardarelli, Naples, Italy
Interests: mini-invasive surgery; bladder cancer; prostate cancer; kidney cancer; urinary stones; BPH
Andrology Unit, A.O.R.N. A.Cardarelli, Naples, Italy
Interests: urinary incontinence; BPH; andrology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The sexual health of adolescents is an especially important issue for national health policies. Adolescents are at elevated risk for adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes relative to their habits, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual behavior, and teenage pregnancy. Despite this, sexuality teaching does not have a widespread diffusion in all schools. Furthermore, the effectiveness of these interventions remains unclear, especially regarding long-term outcomes. Health surveys, introduced in Europe since the 1950s, guarantee important data about the population’s health for health research, welfare, and monitoring. However, adolescents are underrepresented in sexual health research, determining a lack of information about the consciousness of young people about these issues. In this Special Issue, we want to assess the knowledge about the sexuality of adolescents under the age of 18. Moreover, we aim to explore the influence of sex education on sexual knowledge and behavior in early adulthood. We believe that now more than ever, it is necessary for each urologist, each family, and each teacher to focus on this topic. We hope that this Special Issue will provide awareness as well as knowledge about sexual health and behavior during adolescence.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Men’s health;
  • Sexual disfunction;
  • Sexual behavior;
  • Sexually transmitted infections;
  • Infertility;
  • Sexual and reproductive anatomy.

Dr. Francesco Chiancone
Dr. Paolo Fedelini
Dr. Maurizio Carrino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Uro is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • andrology
  • sexual health
  • sexually transmitted infections (STIs)
  • teenage pregnancy
  • sexual behavior
  • sexual and reproductive anatomy
  • sexual disfunction
  • sexuality

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

8 pages, 234 KiB  
Article
Use of Li-ESWT, Tadalafil, and a Vacuum Device to Preserve Erectile Function in Subjects Affected by Peyronie’s Disease and Undergoing Grafting Surgery
Uro 2021, 1(3), 187-194; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro1030019 - 13 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2823
Abstract
Background: Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a little-known disease characterized by pain during erections, the presence of penile curvature, and consequent psychological disorders. In addition, concomitant erectile dysfunction may be present. The treatment of PD is adapted to the patient, especially when the [...] Read more.
Background: Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a little-known disease characterized by pain during erections, the presence of penile curvature, and consequent psychological disorders. In addition, concomitant erectile dysfunction may be present. The treatment of PD is adapted to the patient, especially when the penile curvature is >60°; with stabilized pathology, it is preferable to perform penile straightening approaches, such as penile plication and plaque incision, or partial excision and grafting. The most frequent side effect of straightening approaches is the onset of erectile dysfunction due to the formation of venous leakage appearing after the excision of calcific plaque. Materials and methods: All enrolled patients had PD, a curvature >60°, had an IIEF subdomain erectile function score >16, and refused penile prosthesis implantation concurrent with tunica albuginea grafting surgery. Subsequently, 4 weeks after surgery, all patients underwent a rehabilitation protocol that consisted of low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT), the administration of 5 mg/daily of tadalafil, and the use of a vacuum device. Results: From January 2014 to March 2016, 15 subjects affected by PD with severe penile curvatures were enrolled in the study. At 6 months after surgery, the IIEF scores for erectile function were not statistically significantly different before and after surgery (p > 0.05); the other items, especially orgasmic function (p = 0.01), sexual desire (p < 0.01), intercourse satisfaction (p = 0.01), and overall satisfaction (p = 0.04), were all statistically significant. The modified EDITS questionnaire reported that 80% of patients were satisfied, that 13.3% were dissatisfied, and that 1 patient (6.6%) was dissatisfied with the surgery. Moreover, there was no statistically significant decrease in the patients’ penile lengths. The aim of this study was to use a rehabilitation protocol consisting of Li-ESWT, the administration of 5 mg/daily, and the use of a vacuum device in order to preserve the erectile function of patients undergoing straightening approaches using surgical grafting. In addition, patient satisfaction following surgery was analyzed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Survey and Assessment of Knowledge about Adolescents’ Sexuality)
9 pages, 202 KiB  
Article
“What Do Our Boys Know about Sex?” Preliminary Data of a New Questionnaire for the Evaluation of the Knowledge of Sexuality among Adolescents
Uro 2021, 1(3), 99-107; https://doi.org/10.3390/uro1030013 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 2450
Abstract
Background: The sexual health of young people is an especially important issue for national health policies. Adolescents, in fact, are at elevated risk for adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes relative to their habits, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual behaviour and teenage pregnancy. [...] Read more.
Background: The sexual health of young people is an especially important issue for national health policies. Adolescents, in fact, are at elevated risk for adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes relative to their habits, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual behaviour and teenage pregnancy. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge about sexuality of students under the age of 18. Moreover, we aimed to explore the influence of sex education on sexual knowledge and behaviour. Methods: The participants were enrolled during a cultural exchange project in September 2019. After completing the questionnaire, all students took part in a sex education course performed by an urologist with expertise in sociology and psychology. The adolescents repeated the same survey in a web form in September 2020, one year after the course. Results: Analyzing the data, sex education lessons helped to improve students’ confidence in approaching all the issues of the questionnaire. Moreover, we observed a significant increase in the role of school as main source of information, while the role of the internet, media and family remained stable. Conclusions: This study encouraged the introduction of school-based sexual education policies, pointing to opportunities for structural early intervention programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Survey and Assessment of Knowledge about Adolescents’ Sexuality)
Back to TopTop