The Study of Urban Geography and City Planning

A special issue of Urban Science (ISSN 2413-8851).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 13 December 2024 | Viewed by 17702

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Geography, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago, Spain
Interests: urban studies; urban planning; spatial planning; city planning; regional studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Faculty of Humanities of Toledo, Plaza de Padilla 4, 45071 Toledo, Spain
Interests: urban studies; urban planning; spatial planning; city planning; sustainability

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Guest Editor
Research Group Territorial Analysis (ANTE), Department of Geography, University of Santiago de Compostela, Pza. Universidade 1, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: urban studies; urban planning; spatial planning; small and medium-sized towns

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of urban spaces has a great tradition in geography and other social sciences, but current trends in the field make it necessary to research cities: first, because, in this 21st century, most of the world’s population live in urban spaces; second, current urban processes are complex and geographically contrasted. While the developing countries of sub-Saharan Africa continue to experience a strong urbanization process, in China, a new urban country has already been fully consolidated, with the largest population in cities in the world, and in North America, there are many cities that are currently experiencing degrowth processes. At the same time, in the Old Continent, urban dynamics vary between processes in central cities, including gentrification and urban sprawl. On a global scale, the territorial and social inequalities of these processes are constantly denounced from concepts such as the right to the city, urban justice and sustainability.

In this context, we consider urban planning as the key tool to fight against the predatory and socially unjust neoliberal urbanization. The objective of this Special Issue is to carry out an urban geography in the 21st century and, in a special way, to advance in city planning proposals.

This Special Issue aims to study the main processes that the city is undergoing in recent  decades and the responses to these new realities from different areas that may include the following:

  • urban design;
  • economy, industry and planning;
  • city planning;
  • politics, social change and urban design;
  • cities in transformation;
  • transportation and urban design;
  • equality, inequality and urban design;
  • civic participation and governance;
  • waters and resources management;
  • social policy and urban design;
  • planning history;
  • complex urban systems and processes of cities’ transformations;
  • polycentrism, small and medium size cities;
  • shrinking and aging cities;
  • urban heritage and conservation.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Rubén Camilo Lois González
Prof. Dr. Luis Alfonso Escudero Gómez
Dr. Daniel Barreiro Quintáns
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Urban Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban geography
  • urban spaces
  • urban processes
  • urban dynamics
  • urban planning
  • city planning
  • right to the city
  • urban justice
  • sustainability

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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23 pages, 1880 KiB  
Article
Complicating ‘Suburbanization’ and Spatial Assimilation: The Complex Residential Patterns of Southeast Asian Americans in the Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Area from 1990 to 2010
by Yang Sao Xiong and Mark E. Pfeifer
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(4), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci7040110 - 19 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1582
Abstract
Although spatial assimilation has often been defined as the process whereby a group attains residential propinquity with majority members of a host society, we argue that for certain immigrant groups, substantial suburbanization does not necessarily lead to racial integration. Our analysis using data [...] Read more.
Although spatial assimilation has often been defined as the process whereby a group attains residential propinquity with majority members of a host society, we argue that for certain immigrant groups, substantial suburbanization does not necessarily lead to racial integration. Our analysis using data from the U.S. Census Bureau reveals that between 1990 and 2010, Southeast Asian former refugees in the Minneapolis-St. Paul Metropolitan Statistical Area experienced substantial suburbanization, which is expected given their improved socioeconomic status. However, Southeast Asians’ suburbanization has not led to residential propinquity with non-Hispanic Whites. Despite a small decline in Southeast Asians’ overall segregation at the metropolitan area level during the previous two decades, their segregation levels, as measured by the dissimilarity index, remained unchanged or increased in the central city and the suburbs. Furthermore, our findings reveal different ethnic concentration and segregation patterns among four Southeast Asian subgroups, complicating the meaning of ‘suburbanization’ as simply a process in which people move from the inner city to its less urban outskirts. The finding that substantial suburbanization coexists with high levels of segregation and ethnic concentration raises questions about the assumptions of both the spatial assimilation and place stratification models of immigrant residential processes and outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Study of Urban Geography and City Planning)
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21 pages, 4829 KiB  
Article
Spatial Economic Analysis of Manufacturing Firms Located in the Vicinity of Cape Town International Airport
by Masilonyane Mokhele and Fradreck Garatsa
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci7020035 - 29 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1688
Abstract
Manufacturing activities are at the heart of contemporary capitalist economies, with observable geographical patterns of production. Debates about the interconnections between transportation technology advancements and land use acknowledge that airports can influence the spatial distribution of firms, including those involved in manufacturing. However, [...] Read more.
Manufacturing activities are at the heart of contemporary capitalist economies, with observable geographical patterns of production. Debates about the interconnections between transportation technology advancements and land use acknowledge that airports can influence the spatial distribution of firms, including those involved in manufacturing. However, the manufacturing-related literature describes the land-use mix of airports and their surroundings without an in-depth spatial economic analysis of the firms positioned near airports. This study aimed to conduct a spatial economic analysis of manufacturing firms positioned in the environs of Cape Town International Airport, South Africa. Primary data were collected through survey interviews conducted with the representatives of 23 manufacturing firms situated in the environs of the airport. The study discovered the potential existence of a spatial cluster of manufacturing firms. This cluster is characterized by dense inter- and intraindustry linkages within the study area. It is recommended that planning authorities and other stakeholders augment the clustering of manufacturing firms in the vicinity of Cape Town International Airport, which comprises firms with direct and indirect linkages with the airport. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Study of Urban Geography and City Planning)
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16 pages, 4380 KiB  
Article
A New Top-Down Governance Approach to Community Gardens: A Case Study of the “We Garden” Community Experiment in Shenzhen, China
by Xunyu Zhang, Dongxu Pan, Kapo Wong and Yuanzhi Zhang
Urban Sci. 2022, 6(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci6020041 - 11 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3332
Abstract
Over the past few decades, development in China (including Shenzhen) has been led by the State, meaning that the government has been responsible for major decisions in urban construction and management. However, the current enormous contradiction between people’s demand for livability and Shenzhen’s [...] Read more.
Over the past few decades, development in China (including Shenzhen) has been led by the State, meaning that the government has been responsible for major decisions in urban construction and management. However, the current enormous contradiction between people’s demand for livability and Shenzhen’s unequal and inadequate urban development means that leaving all the administrative work to the government alone has become unsustainable. Since 2020, Shenzhen has introduced a new urban management approach called “We Garden”, in which the government supports public participation aimed to transform idle public lands into green spaces in the form of community gardens. Because this ongoing but novel community garden experiment is a recent development in China, literature investigating the phenomenon context, especially the associated motivations and governance structure, remains scarce. This paper aims to clarify the governance structure and operation mechanism of the Shenzhen community garden program through all stages: from planning and design through construction or implementation to management. Fieldwork with active participation, direct observation, and semi-structured, qualitative interviews as participant in a nonprofit organization revealed that the Shenzhen experiment was driven by urban environmental public governance rather than individual needs. The community garden development approach is a new top-down governance structure that expands on existing governance types in the literature, while emphasizing the key role that nonprofit organizations play in the process. Therefore, this new governance approach expands beyond the environmental improvement of urban communities, serving as a new mechanism for sustainable public participation in urban environmental protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Study of Urban Geography and City Planning)
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13 pages, 1891 KiB  
Article
Recognition and Evaluating the Indicators of Urban Resilient by Using the Network Analysis Process
by Asghar Abedini, Farshid Aram, Amin Khalili and Elham Mirzaei
Urban Sci. 2022, 6(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci6020031 - 24 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2590
Abstract
Today’s cities are increasing their space zones while becoming more vulnerable to natural disasters and man-made threats. The initial evaluation of the resilience of city systems is of great importance and helps develop policies and measures that would improve resilience. This paper, using [...] Read more.
Today’s cities are increasing their space zones while becoming more vulnerable to natural disasters and man-made threats. The initial evaluation of the resilience of city systems is of great importance and helps develop policies and measures that would improve resilience. This paper, using a descriptive–analytic method, defines the characteristics of a resilient city, and natural disasters are addressed. At the same time, the process of reaching a resilient city is investigated. Then, the indicators of resilience have been defined in pillars of ecologic, physiological, social, economic, and managerial–institutional dimensions for the evaluation of a resilient city in Iran. As the sample of the study, the indicators of the study were evaluated in the city of Sanandaj and prioritized in the network analysis process (ANP). The results of this analysis showed that zones one and two, respectively, were the weakest parts regarding urban resilience. In order to move toward a resilient city, future investments should go beyond financial investment and technical solutions and consider human and community development, as well as institutional capacity and inter-organizational cooperation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Study of Urban Geography and City Planning)
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13 pages, 257 KiB  
Article
Relationships between Density and per Capita Municipal Spending in the United States
by Jeremy Mattson
Urban Sci. 2021, 5(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci5030069 - 15 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4292
Abstract
The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between land use, particularly density, and per capita spending levels in cities across the United States. A model was developed using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Annual Survey of State and Local [...] Read more.
The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between land use, particularly density, and per capita spending levels in cities across the United States. A model was developed using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Annual Survey of State and Local Government Finances to estimate the impacts of population-weighted density and other factors on per capita municipal spending. This study focused on municipal spending for eight categories that theoretically could be influenced by land use development: fire protection, streets and highways, libraries, parks and recreation, police, sewer, solid waste management, and water. Density was found to be negatively associated with per capita municipal expenditures for the following cost categories: operational costs for fire protection, streets and highways, parks and recreation, sewer, solid waste management, and water; construction costs for streets and highways, parks and recreation, sewer, and water; and land and existing facility costs for police, sewer, and water. Results were insignificant for other cost categories, and a positive relationship was found for police operations costs. In general, results support the conclusion that increased density is associated with reduced per capita municipal spending for several cost categories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Study of Urban Geography and City Planning)

Review

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16 pages, 1409 KiB  
Review
Planning Tools to Revitalise Urban Vacant Land from Ecological Perspectives: A Systematic Review
by Izyan Ayuni Mohamad Selamat, Sreetheran Maruthaveeran, Mohd Johari Mohd Yusof and Mohd Fairuz Shahidan
Urban Sci. 2023, 7(2), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci7020058 - 01 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1823
Abstract
Urban vacant land availability offers revitalisation opportunities in the form of improving ecological functions. However, less is known about the available planning tools with which to mobilise this effort. Hence, this systematic review adopts ecological perspectives to explore planning tools to revitalise urban [...] Read more.
Urban vacant land availability offers revitalisation opportunities in the form of improving ecological functions. However, less is known about the available planning tools with which to mobilise this effort. Hence, this systematic review adopts ecological perspectives to explore planning tools to revitalise urban vacant land. The search strategy employs Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines to track original research on vacant urban land from selected electronic databases. The search revealed thirty-six studies focusing on substance-oriented planning tools (indicator systems, Geographic Information System (GIS), models/simulations, field surveys, and experiments) and process-oriented tools (questionnaire surveys, the Delphi method, focus groups, and interviews). This review suggests that future studies adopt hybrid planning tools that combine the essence of substance- and process-oriented tools. Furthermore, as a framework, it recommends taking a stepwise approach at various planning stages to revive vacant land. Additional studies from the perspective of growing cities are necessary to provide insights into urban vacant land revitalisation planning, considering the competing objectives of economic prosperity and green space preservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Study of Urban Geography and City Planning)
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