Universe: Feature Papers 2019 - Gravitational Physics

A special issue of Universe (ISSN 2218-1997).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019) | Viewed by 16783

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Ministero dell'Istruzione e del Merito, Viale Unità di Italia 68, 70125 Bari, BA, Italy
Interests: general relativity and gravitation; classical general relativity; post-newtonian approximation, perturbation theory, related approximations; gravitational waves; observational cosmology; mathematical and relativistic aspects of cosmology; modified theories of gravity; higher-dimensional gravity and other theories of gravity; experimental studies of gravity; experimental tests of gravitational theories; geodesy and gravity; harmonics of the gravity potential field; geopotential theory and determination; satellite orbits; orbit determination and improvement; astrometry and reference systems; ephemerides, almanacs, and calendars; lunar, planetary, and deep-space probes
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Guest Editor
Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON, Canada
Interests: cosmology

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Guest Editor
Center for Particle Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
Interests: the cosmological implications of Quantum Field Theories, General Relativity, and Superstring Theories

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Guest Editor
Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
Interests: astroparticle physics; classical and quantum cosmology; string theory; fundamental physics in space; earth system physics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of the distinguished Editorial Board of the journal Universe, whose papers are indexed in SCIE (since 2015) and SCOPUS (from this year) and which have to date been cited 3.4 times on average in ADS-indexed journals, it is a pleasure for me, as Editor-in-Chief, to announce the Special Issue “Universe: Feature Papers 2019—Gravitational Physics”.

This Special Issue aims to set itself at the cutting edge of the most recent advances in the intertwined ties of gravity with other fields at all relevant scales from mutually fertilizing theoretical, phenomenological and experimental perspectives. In particular: (a) the disagreement between local measurements of Hubble's constant, and the value obtained from the ΛCDM model in conjunction with the data extracted from the Planck satellite mission; (b) the status of modified gravity theories after the discovery, with a high degree of accuracy, that the speeds of propagation of gravitational and light waves are equal; and (c) the search for alternative solutions to gravitational field equations representing horizonless compact objects able to mimic the gravitational wave signals attributed to black holes.

We will select 10–20 papers in 2019 from excellent scholars around the world to publish for free in order to benefit both authors and readers.

You are welcome to send short proposals for submissions of feature papers to our Editorial Office (universe@mdpi.com). They will first be evaluated by editors, and then selected papers will be thoroughly and rigorously peer reviewed.

Prof. Dr. Lorenzo Iorio
Prof. Dr. Neil Turok
Prof. Dr. Mark Trodden
Prof. Dr. Orfeu Bertolami
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Universe is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 786 KiB  
Article
The Gravitational Magnetoelectric Effect
by Gary W. Gibbons and Marcus C. Werner
Universe 2019, 5(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/universe5040088 - 01 Apr 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2900
Abstract
Electromagnetism in spacetime can be treated in terms of an analogue linear dielectric medium. In this paper, we discuss the gravitational analogue of the linear magnetoelectric effect, which can be found in multiferroic materials. While this is known to occur for metrics with [...] Read more.
Electromagnetism in spacetime can be treated in terms of an analogue linear dielectric medium. In this paper, we discuss the gravitational analogue of the linear magnetoelectric effect, which can be found in multiferroic materials. While this is known to occur for metrics with non-zero mixed components, we show how it depends on the choice of spatial formalism for the electromagnetic fields, including differences in tensor weight, and also on the choice of coordinate chart. This is illustrated for Langevin–Minkowski, four charts of Schwarzschild spacetime, and two charts of pp gravitational waves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universe: Feature Papers 2019 - Gravitational Physics)
13 pages, 486 KiB  
Article
A Post-Newtonian Gravitomagnetic Effect on the Orbital Motion of a Test Particle around Its Primary Induced by the Spin of a Distant Third Body
by Lorenzo Iorio
Universe 2019, 5(4), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/universe5040087 - 31 Mar 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2206
Abstract
We study a general relativistic gravitomagnetic 3-body effect induced by the spin angular momentum S X of a rotating mass M X orbited at distance r X by a local gravitationally bound restricted two-body system S of size r r X consisting [...] Read more.
We study a general relativistic gravitomagnetic 3-body effect induced by the spin angular momentum S X of a rotating mass M X orbited at distance r X by a local gravitationally bound restricted two-body system S of size r r X consisting of a test particle revolving around a massive body M. At the lowest post-Newtonian order, we analytically work out the doubly averaged rates of change of the Keplerian orbital elements of the test particle by finding non-vanishing long-term effects for the inclination I, the node Ω and the pericenter ω . Such theoretical results are confirmed by a numerical integration of the equations of motion for a fictitious 3-body system. We numerically calculate the magnitudes of the post-Newtonian gravitomagnetic 3-body precessions for some astronomical scenarios in our solar system. For putative man-made orbiters of the natural moons Enceladus and Europa in the external fields of Saturn and Jupiter, the relativistic precessions due to the angular momenta of the gaseous giant planets can be as large as ≃10 − 50 milliarcseconds per year (mas year−1). A preliminary numerical simulation shows that, for certain orbital configurations of a hypothetical Europa orbiter, its range-rate signal Δ ρ ˙ can become larger than the current Doppler accuracy of the existing spacecraft Juno at Jupiter, i.e., σ ρ ˙ = 0.015 mm s−1, after 1 d. The effects induced by the Sun’s angular momentum on artificial probes of Mercury and the Earth are at the level of ≃1 − 0.1 microarcseconds per year (μas year−1). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universe: Feature Papers 2019 - Gravitational Physics)
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Review

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46 pages, 10736 KiB  
Review
The Legacy of Einstein’s Eclipse, Gravitational Lensing
by Jorge L. Cervantes-Cota, Salvador Galindo-Uribarri and George F. Smoot
Universe 2020, 6(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/universe6010009 - 31 Dec 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 10887
Abstract
A hundred years ago, two British expeditions measured the deflection of starlight by the Sun’s gravitational field, confirming the prediction made by Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. One hundred years later many physicists around the world are involved in studying the consequences and [...] Read more.
A hundred years ago, two British expeditions measured the deflection of starlight by the Sun’s gravitational field, confirming the prediction made by Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. One hundred years later many physicists around the world are involved in studying the consequences and use as a research tool, of the deflection of light by gravitational fields, a discipline that today receives the generic name of Gravitational Lensing. The present review aims to commemorate the centenary of Einstein’s Eclipse expeditions by presenting a historical perspective of the development and milestones on gravitational light bending, covering from early XIX century speculations, to its current use as an important research tool in astronomy and cosmology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Universe: Feature Papers 2019 - Gravitational Physics)
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