Sub-Lethal Effects of Emerging Contaminants in Terrestrial and Aquatic Invertebrates

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecotoxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 February 2024) | Viewed by 4107

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CESAM – Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: ecotoxicology; combined stressors; mixture toxicity; ecological risk assessment; bioaccumulation assays
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
CESAM (Centre for Marine and Environmental Studies), Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: zero-waste; circularity; sustainability; ecotoxicology; pesticides; chemical mixtures; Daphnia magna; multigenerational; genotoxicity; mesocosms; environmental risk assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of registered substances in the Chemical Abstract Service Registry database. Although the use of chemicals is almost indispensable in our everyday life, the risks that these emerging chemicals may pose still need to be deeply understood. Therefore, there is a need to provide toxicity data for these substances for better environmental risk assessment (ERA) to ensure safety. Typically, ERA is based on short-term acute exposures to a chemical using model organisms, looking at lethal endpoints such as mortality. The complexity of natural environments requires a more realistic and conservative approach, looking to sub-lethal and long-term experiments, wherein behavioural, biochemical, and physiological parameters should be addressed.

Considering that it is aimed that by 2050 all EU soil ecosystems will be in healthy conditions (EU Soil strategy2030) and the EU Water Framework Directive which aims to protect and restore water bodies, an evaluation of the health status of both terrestrial and aquatic compartment is of particular importance. Thus, this special issue on “Sub-lethal effects of emerging contaminants in terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates” aims to assess the toxic effects of emerging contaminants on soil and aquatic invertebrates.

Original research articles, literature reviews, and short communications are welcome.

Dr. Diogo N. Cardoso
Dr. Ana Rita R. Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emerging compounds
  • biochemical biomarkers
  • DNA damage
  • behavioural endpoints
  • invertebrates
  • climate changes
  • risk assessment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 6826 KiB  
Article
The Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Lambda-Cyhalothrin and Emamectin Benzoate on the Soybean Pest Riptortus pedestris (Fabricius)
by Jianglong Guo, Jingjie An, Hong Chang, Yaofa Li, Zhihong Dang, Chi Wu and Zhanlin Gao
Toxics 2023, 11(12), 971; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11120971 - 30 Nov 2023
Viewed by 862
Abstract
Riptortus pedestris (Fabricius, 1775) (Hemiptera: Alydidae) is a major soybean pest in East Asia that can cause soybean staygreen syndrome. To date, no insecticides have been registered for the control of R. pedestris in China, and these insects are primarily controlled in the [...] Read more.
Riptortus pedestris (Fabricius, 1775) (Hemiptera: Alydidae) is a major soybean pest in East Asia that can cause soybean staygreen syndrome. To date, no insecticides have been registered for the control of R. pedestris in China, and these insects are primarily controlled in the field through the application of broad-spectrum insecticides including lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) and emamectin benzoate (EMB). Here, the lethal and sublethal effects of LCT and EMB on R. pedestris were comprehensively evaluated. LCT and EMB were both found to exhibit high levels of toxicity and concentration-dependent repellent effects for R. pedestris. The exposure of third instar nymphs from the F0 generation to LC30 concentrations of LCT and EMB resulted in a significant increase in the duration of nymph development and adult pre-oviposition period (APOP), together with reductions in fifth instar nymph and adult body weight, longevity, oviposition days, fecundity, vitellarium length, lateral oviduct diameter, and vitellogenin (Vg) gene expression as compared to control treatment. Strikingly, these suppressive effects were transmitted to the F1 generation, which similarly experienced the prolongation of preadult development and the preoviposition period (TPOP). Relative to control-treated populations, the F1 generation for these insecticide-treated groups also exhibited significant decreases in population parameter values. Overall, these data offer new insight into the impact that LCT and EMB treatment can have on R. pedestris, providing a valuable foundation for the application of these pesticides in the context of integrated pest management strategies aimed at soybean crop preservation. Full article
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15 pages, 2081 KiB  
Article
Daphnia magna Multigeneration Exposure to Carbendazim: Gene Transcription Responses
by Ana Rita R. Silva, Patrícia V. Silva, Ana Raquel Soares, M. Nazaret González-Alcaraz, Cornelis A. M. van Gestel, Dick Roelofs, Gabriela Moura, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares and Susana Loureiro
Toxics 2023, 11(11), 918; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11110918 - 10 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1100
Abstract
The world population is experiencing colossal growth and thus demand for food, leading to an increase in the use of pesticides. Persistent pesticide contamination, such as carbendazim, remains a pressing environmental concern, with potentially long-term impacts on aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, [...] Read more.
The world population is experiencing colossal growth and thus demand for food, leading to an increase in the use of pesticides. Persistent pesticide contamination, such as carbendazim, remains a pressing environmental concern, with potentially long-term impacts on aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, Daphnia magna was exposed to carbendazim (5 µg L−1) for 12 generations, with the aim of assessing gene transcription alterations induced by carbendazim (using a D. magna custom microarray). The results showed that carbendazim caused changes in genes involved in the response to stress, DNA replication/repair, neurotransmission, ATP production, and lipid and carbohydrate metabolism at concentrations already found in the environment. These outcomes support the results of previous studies, in which carbendazim induced genotoxic effects and reproduction impairment (increasing the number of aborted eggs with the decreasing number of neonates produced). The exposure of daphnids to carbendazim did not cause a stable change in gene transcription between generations, with more genes being differentially expressed in the F0 generation than in the F12 generation. This could show some possible daphnid acclimation after 12 generations and is aligned with previous multigenerational studies where few ecotoxicological effects at the individual and populational levels and other subcellular level effects (e.g., biochemical biomarkers) were found. Full article
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12 pages, 1701 KiB  
Article
New Insights into Nanoplastics Ecotoxicology: Effects of Long-Term Polystyrene Nanoparticles Exposure on Folsomia candida
by Angela Barreto, Joana Santos, Gonçalo Andrade, Matilde Santos and Vera L. Maria
Toxics 2023, 11(10), 876; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11100876 - 22 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Despite the growing concern over nanoplastics’ (NPls) environmental impacts, their long-term effects on terrestrial organisms remain poorly understood. The main aim of this study was to assess how NPls exposure impacts both the parental (F1) and subsequent generations (F2 and F3) of the [...] Read more.
Despite the growing concern over nanoplastics’ (NPls) environmental impacts, their long-term effects on terrestrial organisms remain poorly understood. The main aim of this study was to assess how NPls exposure impacts both the parental (F1) and subsequent generations (F2 and F3) of the soil-dwelling species Folsomia candida. After a standard exposure (28 days), we conducted a multigenerational study along three generations (84 days), applying polystyrene nanoparticles (PS NPs; diameter of 44 nm) as representatives of NPls. Endpoints from biochemical to individual levels were assessed. The standard test: PS NPs (0.015 to 900 mg/kg) had no effect in F. candida survival or reproduction. The multigenerational test: PS NPs (1.5 and 300 mg/kg) induced no effects on F. candida survival and reproduction along the three generations (F1 to F3). PS NPs induced no effects in catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferases, and acetylcholinesterase activities for the juveniles of the F1 to F3. Oxidative damage through lipid peroxidation was detected in the offspring of F1 but not in the juveniles of F2 and F3. Our findings underscore the importance of evaluating multigenerational effects to gain comprehensive insights into the contaminants long-term impact, particularly when organisms are continuously exposed, as is the case with NPls. Full article
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