Environmental Pollutants Toxicity Mechanism and Safety Testing: Zebrafish as a Model Organism

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Novel Methods in Toxicology Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 4515

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Philosophy, Sciences and Letters of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirao Preto 14040-903, SP, Brazil
Interests: emerging contaminants; environmental toxicology; oxidative stress; flame retardants; mitochondrial toxicity

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Guest Editor
School of Pharmaceutical Science of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirao Preto 14040-903, SP, Brazil
Interests: zebrafish; alternative methods; development toxicity; emerging contaminants; dyes; behavior toxicity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are glad to announce the Special Issue “Environmental Pollutants Toxicity Mechanism and Safety Testing: Zebrafish as a Model Organism” will be published in the journal Toxics (IF: 4.472, ISSN 2305-6304). This issue will be located within the existing literature in a number of ways.

The Special Issue will expand on earlier studies that used zebrafish as a model organism to examine the toxicity of environmental contaminants. It will include the most recent discoveries and insights and offer an updated and thorough review of the most recent developments in this subject. Although zebrafish are increasingly being used to research environmental contaminant toxicity, our knowledge of the underlying processes and safety testing procedures is still lacking. By providing the most recent research on these subjects, the Special Issue will try to close these gaps.

It will highlight interdisciplinary approaches to studying environmental pollutant toxicity in zebrafish, bringing together researchers from various fields to exchange ideas and perspectives. It will also address the difficulties and limitations of using zebrafish as a model organism for studying environmental pollutant toxicity. Finally, the Special Issue will serve as a platform for encouraging further study in this area and will promote the creation of fresh, cutting-edge methods for investigating the toxicity of environmental contaminants in zebrafish.

Prof. Dr. Daniel Junqueira Dorta
Dr. Danielle Palma De Oliveira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zebrafish development
  • zebrafish behavior
  • biomarkers
  • high-throughput screening
  • image-based methods
  • energy allocation
  • omics in zebrafish research
  • emerging environmental pollutants
  • oxidative stress

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 8120 KiB  
Article
Embryotoxicity Induced by Triclopyr in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Early Life Stage
by Ítalo Bertoni, Bianca Camargo Penteado Sales, Cristina Viriato, Paloma Vitória Lima Peixoto and Lílian Cristina Pereira
Toxics 2024, 12(4), 255; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics12040255 - 29 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Triclopyr, an auxin-like herbicide that is widely employed for managing weeds in food crops and pastures, has been identified in various environmental settings, particularly aquatic ecosystems. Limited understanding of the environmental fate of this herbicide, its potential repercussions for both the environment and [...] Read more.
Triclopyr, an auxin-like herbicide that is widely employed for managing weeds in food crops and pastures, has been identified in various environmental settings, particularly aquatic ecosystems. Limited understanding of the environmental fate of this herbicide, its potential repercussions for both the environment and human health, and its insufficient monitoring in diverse environmental compartments has caused it to be recognized as an emerging contaminant of concern. In this study, we have investigated how triclopyr affects zebrafish, considering a new alternative methodology. We focused on the endpoints of developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, and behavior of zebrafish embryos and larvae. We determined that triclopyr has a 96 h median lethal concentration of 87.46 mg/L (341.01 µM). When we exposed zebrafish embryos to sublethal triclopyr concentrations (0.5, 1, 5, 10, and 50 μM) for up to 144 h, we found that 50 µM triclopyr delayed zebrafish egg hatchability. Yolk sac malabsorption was significant at 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 µM triclopyr. In zebrafish larvae, uninflated swim bladder was significant only at 50 µM triclopyr. Furthermore, zebrafish larvae had altered swimming activity after exposure to 10 µM triclopyr for 144 h. In summary, these comprehensive results indicate that even low triclopyr concentrations can elicit adverse effects during early zebrafish development. Full article
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12 pages, 1567 KiB  
Article
Comparing Ocular Toxicity of Legacy and Alternative Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances in Zebrafish Larvae
by Han-seul Lee, Soogyeong Jang, Youngsub Eom and Ki-Tae Kim
Toxics 2023, 11(12), 1021; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11121021 - 14 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1102
Abstract
Studies comparing the ocular toxicity potential between legacy and alternative PFAS are lacking. To address this research gap, zebrafish larvae were exposed to both legacy PFAS (i.e., perfluorooctanesulfonic acid [PFOS] and perfluorooctanoic acid [PFOA]) and their corresponding alternatives (i.e., perfluorobutanesulfonic acid [PFBS] and [...] Read more.
Studies comparing the ocular toxicity potential between legacy and alternative PFAS are lacking. To address this research gap, zebrafish larvae were exposed to both legacy PFAS (i.e., perfluorooctanesulfonic acid [PFOS] and perfluorooctanoic acid [PFOA]) and their corresponding alternatives (i.e., perfluorobutanesulfonic acid [PFBS] and perfluorobutanoic acid [PFBA]). Alterations in their visual behaviors, such as phototactic and optomotor responses (OMR), were assessed at sublethal concentrations. Gene expression variations in visual function-associated pathways were also measured. Visual behavioral assessment revealed that PFOS exposure resulted in concentration-dependent reductions in phototactic responses at 10–1000 μg/L, with PFOA exerting reduction effects only at 100 mg/L. However, their two alternatives had no effect at all tested concentrations. Following an improved contrast-OMR (C-OMR) assessment, PFOS decreased the OMR to a water flow stimulus at 10, 100, and 1000 μg/L. The gene expression analysis revealed that PFOS exposure markedly downregulated most genes involved in the opsins in the photoreceptor and phototransduction cascade, which explains the observed visual behavior changes well. Our findings indicate that PFOS is the most likely PFAS to cause visual toxicity, with PFOA present but less likely, and their substitutes, PFBS and PFBA, cannot be classified as visually toxic to zebrafish. Full article
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17 pages, 2144 KiB  
Article
Toxicity of Beauty Salon Effluents Contaminated with Hair Dye on Aquatic Organisms
by Letícia C. Gonçalves, Matheus M. Roberto, Paloma V. L. Peixoto, Cristina Viriato, Adriana F. C. da Silva, Valdenilson J. A. de Oliveira, Mariza C. C. Nardi, Lilian C. Pereira, Dejanira de F. de Angelis and Maria A. Marin-Morales
Toxics 2023, 11(11), 911; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11110911 - 07 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Cosmetic residues have been found in water resources, especially trace elements of precursors, couplers, and pigments of hair dyes, which are indiscriminately disposed of in the sewage system. These contaminants are persistent, bioactive, and bioaccumulative, and may pose risks to living beings. Thus, [...] Read more.
Cosmetic residues have been found in water resources, especially trace elements of precursors, couplers, and pigments of hair dyes, which are indiscriminately disposed of in the sewage system. These contaminants are persistent, bioactive, and bioaccumulative, and may pose risks to living beings. Thus, the present study assessed the ecotoxicity of two types of effluents generated in beauty salons after the hair dyeing process. The toxicity of effluent derived from capillary washing with water, shampoo, and conditioner (complete effluent—CE) and effluent not associated with these products (dye effluent—DE) was evaluated by tests carried out with the aquatic organisms Artemia salina, Daphnia similis, and Danio rerio. The bioindicators were exposed to pure samples and different dilutions of both effluents. The results showed toxicity in D. similis (CE50 of 3.43% and 0.54% for CE and DE, respectively); A. salina (LC50 8.327% and 3.874% for CE and DE, respectively); and D. rerio (LC50 of 4.25–4.59% and 7.33–8.18% for CE and DE, respectively). Given these results, we can infer that hair dyes, even at low concentrations, have a high toxic potential for aquatic biota, as they induced deleterious effects in all tested bioindicators. Full article
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13 pages, 2173 KiB  
Article
Comparative Assessment of the Toxicity of Brominated and Halogen-Free Flame Retardants to Zebrafish in Terms of Tail Coiling Activity, Biomarkers, and Locomotor Activity
by Taisa Carla Rizzi Rialto, Renan Vieira Marino, Flavia Renata Abe, Daniel Junqueira Dorta and Danielle Palma Oliveira
Toxics 2023, 11(9), 732; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11090732 - 25 Aug 2023
Viewed by 943
Abstract
BDE-47, a flame retardant that is frequently detected in environmental compartments and human tissues, has been associated with various toxic effects. In turn, information about the effects of aluminum diethyl-phosphinate (ALPI), a halogen-free flame retardant from a newer generation, is limited. This study [...] Read more.
BDE-47, a flame retardant that is frequently detected in environmental compartments and human tissues, has been associated with various toxic effects. In turn, information about the effects of aluminum diethyl-phosphinate (ALPI), a halogen-free flame retardant from a newer generation, is limited. This study aims to assess and compare the toxicity of BDE-47 and ALPI to zebrafish by analyzing the tail coiling, locomotor, acetylcholinesterase activities, and oxidative stress biomarkers. At 3000 µg/L BDE-47, the coiling frequency increased at 26–27 h post-fertilization (hpf), but the burst activity (%) and mean burst duration (s) did not change significantly. Here, we considered that the increased coiling frequency is a slight neurotoxic effect because locomotor activity was impaired at 144 hpf and 300 µg/L BDE-47. Moreover, we hypothesized that oxidative stress could be involved in the BDE-47 toxicity mechanisms. In contrast, only at 30,000 µg/L did ALPI increase the catalase activity, while the motor behavior during different developmental stages remained unaffected. On the basis of these findings, BDE-47 is more toxic than ALPI. Full article
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