Progress in the Use of Advanced Imaging for Radiation Oncology

A special issue of Tomography (ISSN 2379-139X). This special issue belongs to the section "Cancer Imaging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1432

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
Interests: CNS tumors; pediatric malignancies; radiation oncology; proton therapy; radiosurgery; MRI; MR spectroscopy; radiomics; advanced imaging; quantitative imaging
Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
Interests: radiation oncology; proton therapy; pediatric malignancies; pediatric brain tumors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of radiation oncology seeks to improve outcomes of cancer patients by treating their malignancies with ionizing radiation. Imaging is integral to the practice of radiation oncology not only to aid in treatment planning but also for serial response assessment. As technological advances have continued to improve the ability to deliver radiation doses more accurately, this has further increased the need to develop more advanced imaging modalities to better determine the extent of disease involvement as well as the precise localization of surrounding critical normal tissues.

This Special Issue seeks to highlight the increasing use of advanced imaging in radiation oncology and how this may improve the outcomes of patients with cancer. We encourage researchers to submit original research articles, comprehensive reviews, case reports or other report types that do not necessarily fit the previous categories that focus on use of advance imaging modalities that can impact the practice of radiation oncology.

Prof. Dr. Hui-Kuo Shu
Dr. Bree Eaton
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tomography is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • CT
  • MRI
  • PET
  • radiation oncology
  • advanced imaging
  • quantitative imaging
  • cancer

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 5375 KiB  
Article
The Utility of Spectroscopic MRI in Stereotactic Biopsy and Radiotherapy Guidance in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma
by Abinand C. Rejimon, Karthik K. Ramesh, Anuradha G. Trivedi, Vicki Huang, Eduard Schreibmann, Brent D. Weinberg, Lawrence R. Kleinberg, Hui-Kuo G. Shu, Hyunsuk Shim and Jeffrey J. Olson
Tomography 2024, 10(3), 428-443; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10030033 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1126
Abstract
Current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for gliomas have limitations hindering survival outcomes. We propose spectroscopic magnetic resonance imaging as an adjunct to standard MRI to bridge these gaps. Spectroscopic MRI is a volumetric MRI technique capable of identifying tumor infiltration based on its [...] Read more.
Current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for gliomas have limitations hindering survival outcomes. We propose spectroscopic magnetic resonance imaging as an adjunct to standard MRI to bridge these gaps. Spectroscopic MRI is a volumetric MRI technique capable of identifying tumor infiltration based on its elevated choline (Cho) and decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA). We present the clinical translatability of spectroscopic imaging with a Cho/NAA ≥ 5x threshold for delineating a biopsy target in a patient diagnosed with non-enhancing glioma. Then, we describe the relationship between the undertreated tumor detected with metabolite imaging and overall survival (OS) from a pilot study of newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with belinostat and chemoradiation. Each cohort (control and belinostat) were split into subgroups using the median difference between pre-radiotherapy Cho/NAA ≥ 2x and the treated T1-weighted contrast-enhanced (T1w-CE) volume. We used the Kaplan–Meier estimator to calculate median OS for each subgroup. The median OS was 14.4 months when the difference between Cho/NAA ≥ 2x and T1w-CE volumes was higher than the median compared with 34.3 months when this difference was lower than the median. The T1w-CE volumes were similar in both subgroups. We find that patients who had lower volumes of undertreated tumors detected via spectroscopy had better survival outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Progress in the Use of Advanced Imaging for Radiation Oncology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop