Symmetry in Mechanical Engineering III

A special issue of Symmetry (ISSN 2073-8994). This special issue belongs to the section "Computer".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 9547

Special Issue Editors


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College of Engineering, Najran University, Najran 61441, Saudi Arabia
Interests: diagnostics and prognostics; pattern recognition; statistical analysis of big data; machine fault diagnostics; non-destructive testing; condition monitoring; Internet of things; artificial intelligence; industrial electronics; smart cities and smart healthcare
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Faculty of Integrated Technologies, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Gadong BE1410, Brunei Darussalam
Interests: vibration, acoustic emission, and bio-medical signal processing; vibration condition monitoring, feature extraction, intelligent fault diagnosis, and prognosis; pattern recognition, machine learning, and deep learning; mechatronics and bio-mechatronics, instrumentation, and control system; product design, structure analysis, and finite element method
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College of Quality & Safety Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018, China
Interests: safety science and engineering; accident prevention; spontaneous combustion; thermodynamics; solid waste resource transformation and safe disposal
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue invites original research papers that report on the state-of-the-art and recent advancements which are related to symmetry in mechanical engineering: measurement, fault diagnosis, construction, operation and maintenance of machines, vibration, noise, smart–material systems, integrated systems, stresses, deformations, mechanical properties, signal processing of mechanical systems, fault diagnosis of machines, shafts, springs, belts, bearings, gears, rotors, rotor dynamics, and machine elements. This Special Issue encompasses applications in mechanical engineering, modeling methods for rigid-body mechanics, structural mechanics, impact mechanics, strain localization, tribology, and thermodynamics. Review articles related to mechanical engineering are also encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Adam Glowacz
Dr. Muhammad Irfan
Dr. Wahyu Caesarendra
Dr. Hui Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Symmetry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • deformation
  • stresses
  • mechanical properties
  • tribology
  • thermodynamic
  • measurement
  • fault diagnosis
  • machine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 3877 KiB  
Article
Thixotropic Behavior in Defining Particle Packing Density of Highly Filled AP/HTPB-Based Propellant
by Afni Restasari, Luthfia Hajar Abdillah, Retno Ardianingsih, Hamonangan Rekso Diputro Sitompul, Rika Suwana Budi, Kendra Hartaya and Heri Budi Wibowo
Symmetry 2021, 13(10), 1767; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13101767 - 23 Sep 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2613
Abstract
An alarming, asymmetric flame in rocket combustion originates from a composite solid propellant (CSP) containing defects. The defects are the result of a composition that exceeds the maximum particle packing density. Based on the structure analysis of CSP, the addition of plasticizer causes [...] Read more.
An alarming, asymmetric flame in rocket combustion originates from a composite solid propellant (CSP) containing defects. The defects are the result of a composition that exceeds the maximum particle packing density. Based on the structure analysis of CSP, the addition of plasticizer causes the correlation between the viscosity of CSP slurry and particle packing density to become uncertain. This work aims to investigate the influence of thixotropic behavior on the maximum particle packing density of CSP. A CSP with different thixotropic behavior was successfully produced using aluminum/plasticizer dioctyl adipate (DOA) of 12–24. During the curing process, viscosity and stress–growth were investigated. The structure of the CSP was defined using X-ray radiography. It is remarkably observed that the peak of thixotropy occurred at the 15th minute of the curing process. The particle packing density of CSP can be decisive for the relative viscosity at the peak time of thixotropic behavior. The CSP with the highest relative viscosity at the peak time was revealed to have voids in the upper part of the CSP. Thus, this parameter was proven to change the preceding parameter, viscosity that was measured at the end of mixing. Based on the stress–growth analysis, it is conceivable that the mechanism involves the time-dependent diffusion of DOA in weakening aluminum agglomerates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Symmetry in Mechanical Engineering III)
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15 pages, 63198 KiB  
Article
Numerical Investigation on the Formation and Penetration Behavior of Explosively Formed Projectile (EFP) with Variable Thickness Liner
by Dong Yang and Jiajian Lin
Symmetry 2021, 13(8), 1342; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13081342 - 25 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 5127
Abstract
Explosively formed projectiles (EFPs) are widely used in civil applications and the military field for their excellent impact performance. How to give full play to the energy accumulation effect of explosives and improve the penetration performance has become the main problem of EFP [...] Read more.
Explosively formed projectiles (EFPs) are widely used in civil applications and the military field for their excellent impact performance. How to give full play to the energy accumulation effect of explosives and improve the penetration performance has become the main problem of EFP design. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of liner structure on EFP formation and its penetration behavior. In order to achieve this, a finite element (FE) model was first established on the basis of the Lagrange and ALE method. Then, formation and penetration performance tests of EFP were performed to verify the validity and feasibility of the proposed FE model, where the configuration, velocity of EFP, and penetration diameter left on the target plate were compared. Finally, by using the proposed FE model, the entire process of the formation and penetration behavior of EFP with axial symmetrical variable thickness liners were analyzed, where spherical-segment liners with uniform and non-uniform thickness were developed. The results were drawn as follows: the numerical simulation error of EFP velocity was less than 5%, and the simulated penetration diameter was compared to the 8.6% error obtained from the experimental method. It demonstrated that the proposed FE model had higher prediction precision. After the explosive was detonated, a forward-folding EFP was formed by the liner with a thin edge thickness, while the EFP formed by the liner with uniform thickness had a backward-folded configuration. It was also found that the liner with a thin edge thickness gave the largest steady velocity of EFP, and it was the lowest by using the liner with uniform thickness. There were two types of loads generated after the formation of an EFP, those were shock wave loading and an EFP, both causing damage in the target plate during the process of an EFP’s penetration into it. The shock wave induced by liners with non-uniform thickness caused higher damage in the target plate, the maximum value of stress was reached at about 4.0 GPa. The forward-folding EFP formed by the liner with the thinnest edge thickness had the largest penetration ability. The backward-folded EFP, owing to the hollow structure, had the worst penetration ability, which failed to penetrate the target plate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Symmetry in Mechanical Engineering III)
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