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Research and Technology for Waste Management and Resource Recovery in a Sustainable Environment

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2023) | Viewed by 4442

Special Issue Editors

Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, 50190 Borås, Sweden
Interests: biotechnology; waste management; food technology; biorefinery; natural products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, 50190 Borås, Sweden
Interests: resource recovery; bioconversion processes; waste biorefinery; membrane separation technology and membrane bioreactors; acidogenic fermentation; volatile fatty acids production and their applications; filamentous fungal production
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to contribute to our upcoming Special Issue in Sustainability concerning resource recovery of different types of municipal and industrial waste, by-products, side-streams, and residuals via the conversion to value-added products.

One of the contributions that this Special Issue aims to achieve is how the substrates generated in the industry can be made useful. For this, various issues such as

(1) production of value-added microbial products by biotechnological methods;

(2) generation of valuable products by thermochemical conversions;

(3) recovery of bioactive compounds and nutrients by extraction methods;

(4) development of sustainable bio-composites from renewable resources, etc.

are important topics of this Special Issue. To this end, it is to encourage a productive discussion that can lead to waste reduction.

Other contributions for a sustainable economy are for the development of model/process integrations, techno-economic analyses, and life cycle assessment studies for biological production facilities.

We are open to contributions from many different disciplines, such as Biotechnology, Chemistry, Environment Technology, Engineering, Food Science, Economy, and more.

Given the importance and relevance of this Special Issue, we invite researchers to contribute original research articles as well as review articles. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Sustainable resource recovery;
  • Circular bioeconomy;
  • Fermentation and separation technologies;
  • Biodegradation assessment;
  • Processes integration and intensification ;
  • Sustainable systems;
  • Waste valorisation.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Taner Sar
Dr. Amir Mahboubi Soufiani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • resource recovery
  • bioconversion
  • extraction
  • bioproducts
  • biorefinery
  • valorization
  • waste management
  • circular economy
  • sustainability
  • techno-economic analysis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 2355 KiB  
Article
Ultrasonic–Thermal Regeneration of Spent Powdered Activated Carbon
by Tingting Zhang, Yanling Yang, Xing Li, Zhiwei Zhou and Bigui Wei
Sustainability 2023, 15(11), 9060; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15119060 - 03 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1217
Abstract
This study investigated the ultrasonic–thermal regeneration of powdered activated carbon (PAC) spent using 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). Similarly, a thermal regeneration process was also studied and the reaction conditions (i.e., regeneration temperature, heating rate, regeneration time) were tested. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis [...] Read more.
This study investigated the ultrasonic–thermal regeneration of powdered activated carbon (PAC) spent using 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). Similarly, a thermal regeneration process was also studied and the reaction conditions (i.e., regeneration temperature, heating rate, regeneration time) were tested. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were applied to characterize the regenerated PACs under different treatments (thermal, ultrasonic and ultrasonic–thermal) and also compare them with the fresh and exhausted PACs. According to our regeneration observations, the ideal regeneration parameters were determined to be a 40 kHz frequency, 0.18 W/mL sonication power, 0.1 M NaOH and 50% (v/v) ethyl alcohol as the regeneration solution, and 1 g/L of saturated PAC mass with thermal regeneration as the second stage at 500 °C, desorbed for 30 min with a heating rate of 20 °C min−1. Under these conditions, the RE value achieved 90.99% and the η value reached 5.6%. The results of FTIR, XPS and XRD revealed that the oxygen functional group content of ultrasonic–thermal regenerated PAC significantly increased. These oxygenous groups exerted a positive effect on the adsorption process of the regenerated PAC and the subsequent adsorption–regeneration process. Full article
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12 pages, 1117 KiB  
Article
Antimicrobial Activities of Olive Oil Mill Wastewater Extracts against Selected Microorganisms
by Taner Sar and Meltem Yesilcimen Akbas
Sustainability 2023, 15(10), 8179; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15108179 - 17 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1181
Abstract
Discovering eco-friendly alternatives to synthetic chemicals has become an increasingly popular area of research. Natural products are now in the spotlight for their potential use as replacements for synthetic chemicals. To maximize the benefits of these natural products, it is important to use [...] Read more.
Discovering eco-friendly alternatives to synthetic chemicals has become an increasingly popular area of research. Natural products are now in the spotlight for their potential use as replacements for synthetic chemicals. To maximize the benefits of these natural products, it is important to use efficient extraction methods, especially from agroindustrial waste. Olive oil mill wastewater (OOMW) is a byproduct of the olive oil production process and is considered a pollutant; however, OOMW contains a wide range of phenolic compounds that have proven antimicrobial properties. This study investigates the extraction of these compounds from OOMW, with the aim of determining their potential antimicrobial activities against several bacterial strains and fungi, including Bacillus spizizenii, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella aerogenes, Streptococcus uberis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. The OOMW extracts (OEs) were prepared by using three different solvents: ethyl acetate, ethanol, and methanol. The highest total phenolic contents (4.03 g, GAE/L) and the strongest antibacterial activity were obtained with methanol extraction. All OEs showed no antifungal activity against C. albicans. OEs, particularly methanol extracts of OOMW, can be used as bioactive substances in various industries as nutraceuticals and food ingredients, respectively. Full article
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17 pages, 2422 KiB  
Article
Free and Encapsulated Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacteria for the Enhanced Dissolution of Swine Wastewater-Derived Struvite—An Attractive Approach for Green Phosphorus Fertilizer
by Suphatsorn Jokkaew, Krittayapong Jantharadej, Chonlada Pokhum, Chamorn Chawengkijwanich and Benjaporn Boonchayaanant Suwannasilp
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12627; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912627 - 04 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1425
Abstract
Struvite and hydroxyapatite are byproducts of phosphorus removal from wastewater that can be used as phosphate fertilizers. Due to their low water solubility, especially in alkaline soils, their use is currently limited. The use of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria to enhance the dissolution of struvite [...] Read more.
Struvite and hydroxyapatite are byproducts of phosphorus removal from wastewater that can be used as phosphate fertilizers. Due to their low water solubility, especially in alkaline soils, their use is currently limited. The use of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria to enhance the dissolution of struvite and hydroxyapatite could be an attractive solution for expanding their use, but literature reports on this are limited. In this study, Arthrobacter sp. (TBRC 5201), Azotobacter vinelandii (TBRC 7231), and Bacillus megaterium (TBRC 1396) were evaluated for their ability to dissolve struvite and hydroxyapatite on agar media with struvite or hydroxyapatite as the sole source of phosphorus. Only B. megaterium (TBRC 1396) was able to use struvite and hydroxyapatite for growth. After 14 d of incubation in liquid medium, B. megaterium (TBRC 1396) dissolved phosphorus from struvite up to 835.45 ± 11.76 mg P/l compared with 196.08 ± 3.92 mg P/l in a control without cells, whereas the dissolution of hydroxyapatite by B. megaterium was minimal. B. megaterium (TBRC 1396) was also capable of dissolving phosphorus from swine wastewater-derived struvite. Both free cells and alginate-encapsulated cells of B. megaterium (TBRC 1396) were able to rapidly dissolve phosphorus from swine wastewater-derived struvite, resulting in soluble phosphorus concentrations that reached 400 mg P/l within 2 days, compared with those without cells that required 12 days. In conclusion, the application of struvite with phosphate-solubilizing bacteria is a promising tool for green sustainable agriculture. Full article
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