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The Nexus of Thermal Comfort, Energy Use and Air Quality

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2021) | Viewed by 4677

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Landscape Architecture, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds LS1 3HE, UK
Interests: urban microclimates; pedestrians’ thermal comfort; urban climate design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I invite you to submit your paper to this Special Issue of Sustainability (MDPI, Impact Factor 2,576) on the Nexus of Thermal Comfort, Energy Use and Air Quality. These topics have been investigated since the 1970s. Now, with the growing awareness of the impact of urban environments on human health and energy use, more research is being done on these topics separately. Simulation programmes and measurement tools are evolving to much higher resolution and accuracy, respectively. It is now time to think comprehensively, and to collate the impact of urban interventions on thermal comfort, energy use, and air quality.

The aim of this call is to close the loop and gather all correlated topics in one Special Issue.

The topics of this Special Issue will cover, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Outdoor thermal comfort within microclimates;
  • Heat mitigation strategies at urban and local scales;
  • The impact of heat waves on thermal comfort and energy use;
  • Passive climate design strategies;
  • Air pollution within canyons and microclimates;
  • How urban characteristics affect indoor energy use and thermal comfort;
  • Urban climate measurement and modelling;
  • Green interventions and nature-based solutions;
  • Urban heat islands and human health;
  • Different urban forms and canyon orientations.

The aim is to cover studies from different climates. Then, hopefully, the outcome could be a teaching resource for higher education programmes. Therefore, review papers are encouraged.

Early career researchers are also very welcome to submit their recent findings.

Submitted papers will be peer reviewed. Papers can be submitted at any point from now until the deadline on 30 May 2021.

I wish you success in the publication of your research in this Special Issue.

Dr. Mohammad Taleghani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • thermal comfort
  • urban heat islands
  • heat mitigation strategies
  • urban climate design
  • air quality
  • microclimates

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 5567 KiB  
Article
Influence of Tree Canopy Coverage and Leaf Area Density on Urban Heat Island Mitigation
by Atefeh Tamaskani Esfehankalateh, Jack Ngarambe and Geun Young Yun
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7496; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137496 - 05 Jul 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3862
Abstract
Urban heat islands (UHI) are a widely documented phenomenon that adversely increases urban overheating and, among other effects, contributes to heat-related mortalities and morbidities in urban areas. Consequently, comprehensive UHI-mitigating measures are essential for improving urban microclimate environments and contributing to salutogenic urban [...] Read more.
Urban heat islands (UHI) are a widely documented phenomenon that adversely increases urban overheating and, among other effects, contributes to heat-related mortalities and morbidities in urban areas. Consequently, comprehensive UHI-mitigating measures are essential for improving urban microclimate environments and contributing to salutogenic urban design practices. This study proposed urban cooling strategies involving different tree percentages and leaf area densities in a dense urban area during the summertime in Korea. The cooling effects of sixteen various combinations of proposed scenarios based on common urban tree types were studied via in-situ field measurements and numerical modeling, considering both vegetated and exposed areas. It was observed that by changing the characteristics of the leaf area density (LAD) per plant of our vegetated base area—for instance, from 4% trees to 60% trees, from a low LAD to a high LAD—the daily average and daily maximum temperatures were reduced by approximately 3 °C and 5.23 °C, respectively. The obtained results demonstrate the usefulness of urban trees to mitigate urban heating, and they are particularly useful to urban designers and policymakers in their efforts to minimize UHI effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Nexus of Thermal Comfort, Energy Use and Air Quality)
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