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Hyperspectral Imaging for Sustainable Waste Recycling

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2023) | Viewed by 8296

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, 00184 Rome, Italy
Interests: characterization of materials; primary and secondary raw material quality control; waste recycling; hyperspectral imaging techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Ce.R.S.I.Te.S Research and Service Center for Sustainable Technological Innovation, Sapienza-University of Rome, Latina, Italy
Interests: characterization and classification of materials; advanced photonic techniques; spectroscopy; chemometric techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials & Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, 00184 Rome, Italy
Interests: waste recycling; urban mining; sustainable use of resources; applications of hyperspectral imaging and other sensing techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit your research to a Special Issue of the MDPI journal Sustainability, entitled “Hyperspectral Imaging for Sustainable Waste Recycling”. In recent years, the amount of produced solid waste has dramatically increased, generating concerns regarding the necessity of developing a robust and efficient valorization chain through reuse and recycling.

The possibility of efficiently converting waste into a resource as a secondary raw material is strictly linked to the ability to develop low-cost, fast, effective and robust techniques, able to detect, characterize and sort solid waste products in all recycling stages. Cost-effectiveness and reliability are crucial characteristics of technology in order to achieve optimal performance in terms of material identification. From this point of view, optical-digital detection techniques can be profitably applied especially for recycling purposes.

Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) can represent a solution for the characterization, sorting and quality control stages in the waste and recycling sector, where efficient but low-cost technologies are needed. HSI-based techniques, being noninvasive and nondestructive, could dramatically contribute to improving the quality of solid-waste-derived products, allowing the possibility to implement on-line, at-line and in-line quality control strategies for recovered products.

Therefore, we are seeking original research contributions concerning the application of HSI as a tool to support material recovery and waste recycling.

This Special Issue focuses on demonstrating that HSI can be considered as an eco-friendly approach and sustainable system to profitably use in circular economy perspectives.

The topics of interest include HSI-based machine learning techniques, computer vision and chemical imaging applications able to improve existing sorting and/or quality control procedures or to develop novel ones in the waste recycling sector.

We sincerely hope this invitation receives your favorable consideration. 

Dr. Roberta Palmieri
Dr. Riccardo Gasbarrone
Prof. Dr. Silvia Serranti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hyperspectral imaging
  • secondary raw materials
  • waste recycling
  • sustainable techniques

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 184 KiB  
Editorial
Hyperspectral Imaging for Sustainable Waste Recycling
by Roberta Palmieri, Riccardo Gasbarrone and Ludovica Fiore
Sustainability 2023, 15(10), 7752; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15107752 - 9 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1823
Abstract
Waste management is a crucial global issue that affects both society and the environment [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperspectral Imaging for Sustainable Waste Recycling)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

22 pages, 10951 KiB  
Article
An Automated Classification of Recycled Aggregates for the Evaluation of Product Standard Compliance
by Silvia Serranti, Roberta Palmieri, Giuseppe Bonifazi, Riccardo Gasbarrone, Gauthier Hermant and Herve Bréquel
Sustainability 2023, 15(20), 15009; https://doi.org/10.3390/su152015009 - 18 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 879
Abstract
Nowadays, recycling of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) is a challenging opportunity for the management of such end-of-life (EOL) materials through alternative methods to environmentally unsustainable methods (i.e., landfilling). In order to make recycling processes more effective, quality control systems are needed. In [...] Read more.
Nowadays, recycling of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) is a challenging opportunity for the management of such end-of-life (EOL) materials through alternative methods to environmentally unsustainable methods (i.e., landfilling). In order to make recycling processes more effective, quality control systems are needed. In this work, the possibility of developing a sensor-based procedure to recognize different demolition waste materials from a recycling perspective was explored. An automatic recognition of different predefined constituent classes of recyclables (i.e., concrete, mortar, natural stones, unbound aggregates, clay masonry units, bituminous materials) and contaminants (i.e., glass, metals, wood, cardboard, and gypsum plaster), as established by an European standard, was carried out using hyperspectral imaging (HSI) working in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) range (1000–2500 nm). The implemented classification strategies, starting from the collected hyperspectral images of the analyzed constituents, allowed for the identification of the different material categories. Two main models were built for identifying contaminants in recyclable materials and categorizing material groups based on technical specifications. The results showed accurate category identification with Sensitivity and Specificity values over 0.9 in all models. The possibility of performing a full detection of C&DW recycling products can dramatically contribute to increasing the quality of the final marketable products and their commercial value, at the same time reducing the amount of waste and the consumption of primary raw materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperspectral Imaging for Sustainable Waste Recycling)
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16 pages, 5458 KiB  
Article
Hyperspectral Imaging Applied to WEEE Plastic Recycling: A Methodological Approach
by Giuseppe Bonifazi, Ludovica Fiore, Riccardo Gasbarrone, Roberta Palmieri and Silvia Serranti
Sustainability 2023, 15(14), 11345; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151411345 - 21 Jul 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2155
Abstract
In this study, the possibility of applying the hyperspectral imaging (HSI) technique in the Short-Wave InfraRed (SWIR) spectral range to characterize polymeric parts coming from Waste from Electric and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is explored. Different case studies are presented referring to the identification [...] Read more.
In this study, the possibility of applying the hyperspectral imaging (HSI) technique in the Short-Wave InfraRed (SWIR) spectral range to characterize polymeric parts coming from Waste from Electric and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is explored. Different case studies are presented referring to the identification of (i) plastic flakes inside a mixed waste stream coming from a recycling plant of monitors and flat screens, (ii) different polymers inside a mixed plastic waste stream coming from End-Of-Life (EOL) electronic device housings and trims, (iii) contaminants (i.e., metals) in a mix of shredded plastic particles coming from a recycling line of electrical cables, and (iv) brominated plastics in mixed streams constituted by small appliances (i.e., cathode-ray tube televisions and monitors). The application of chemometric techniques to hyperspectral data demonstrated the potentiality of this approach for systematic utilization for material characterization, quality control and sorting purposes. The experimental findings highlight the feasibility of employing this method due to its user-friendly nature and quick detection response. To increase and optimize WEEE valorization avoiding disposal in landfills or incineration, recycling-oriented characterization and/or quality control of the processed products are fundamental to identify and quantify substances to be recovered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperspectral Imaging for Sustainable Waste Recycling)
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11 pages, 3931 KiB  
Article
Preliminary Studies on Conversion of Sugarcane Bagasse into Sustainable Fibers for Apparel Textiles
by Mohammed Jalalah, Zubair Khaliq, Zulfiqar Ali, Adnan Ahmad, Muhammad Bilal Qadir, Ali Afzal, Umer Ashraf, M. Faisal, Mabkhoot Alsaiari, Muhammad Irfan, Saeed A. Alsareii and Farid A. Harraz
Sustainability 2022, 14(24), 16450; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142416450 - 8 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2718
Abstract
Owing to increased environmental awareness and the implementation of stringent governmental regulations, the demand for the valorization of natural fibers has increased in recent years. Sugarcane bagasse after juice extraction could be a potential source of natural fibers to be used in textile [...] Read more.
Owing to increased environmental awareness and the implementation of stringent governmental regulations, the demand for the valorization of natural fibers has increased in recent years. Sugarcane bagasse after juice extraction could be a potential source of natural fibers to be used in textile applications. In this paper, sugarcane bagasse is converted to textile fibers. Sugarcane fibers are extracted through alkali and H2O2 treatment with varying concentrations (6, 10, 14) g/L and (8, 12, 16) g/L, respectively. To soften the fibers for textile use, extracted fibers were post-treated with a constant ratio of silicone softener (50 g/L). Treatment of sugarcane fibers with varying concentrations of alkali–H2O2 significantly influenced the fiber surface morphology. Furthermore, an increase in the crystallinity of extracted fibers was observed, whereas a reduction in fiber linear density from 54.82 tex to 45.13 tex as well as moisture regain (6.1% to 5.1%) was observed as the ratio of alkali–H2O2 treatment was increased. A notable improvement in overall mechanical strength was achieved upon alkali–H2O2 treatment, but at a higher concentration (conc.) there was a loss of mechanical strength, and the torsional and flexural rigidity also increased significantly. Based on the results, sugarcane fibers treated with 10 g/L NaOH, 12 g/L H2O2 and 50 g/L silicone softener showed the most optimum results. These sustainable fibers have the potential to be used in textile applications due to their enhanced softness, optimum moisture regain, and better mechanical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperspectral Imaging for Sustainable Waste Recycling)
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