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Frontiers in Economic Geography

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability in Geographic Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 13432

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: communication; demography; emotion; cognition and human development; human geography; ICT; psychology; urban and regional planning

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Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Atmospheric Science, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA
Interests: political economy; economic geography; construction of space and place

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Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Town and Country Planning, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15705 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: urban geography; economic development; cultural studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is intended to show the recent interdisciplinary development of economic geography and spatial analyses of human behavior, as well as to discuss possible directions for its future development. Economic geography has recently come into collision with numerous topics and conceptual standpoints that lie outside of its traditional areas of focus. We focus on interdisciplinary conceptual connections among the geographical, technological, cultural, economic, psychological, anthropological, sociological, and historical points of view. Topics of special interest are the intersections between economic geography and political economy, information technologies, demography, emotions and affect,  the digital world, globalization, and cultural geography. Frontiers in economic geography will complement the existing literature in a useful way, and should contribute new ideas, approaches, orientations, and priorities for an enriching debate on the future of geographical science.

The focus of the Special Issue will be on how the changing contours of economic geography have brought it into a creative tension with new topics and theories, making the discipline far more interdisciplinary in its outlook. The result has been a proliferation of ways in which space has been conceptualized. Coversely, spatial analysis has become increasingly important for related disciplines, leading to a widespread spatialization of the social sciences.

Among the new topics to be discussed, two can be highlighted for their novelty and interdisciplinary  nature. On the one hand, there is the economy of identity, an approach that links the economic performance, capabilities, and place. On the other hand, there is social innovation, which relates the capacities of small- and medium-sized communities with the possibilities of introducing new factors of economic development. Finally, the recent approach to the circular economy opens up prospects for a new dialogue between economic and territorial analysis.

Although economic geographers have experienced a recent renaissance of conceptual and empirical work, there have been few attempts to systematically relate these changes to other disciplines. This issue will introduce many readers outside of geography to contemporary developments.

Prof. Dr. Carlos Ferrás Sexto
Prof. Dr. Barney Warf
Prof. Dr. Rubén C. Lois-González
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • interdisciplinary knowledge
  • innovation
  • spatial analysis
  • conceptual connections
  • geography
  • human behavior
  • digital world

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 16289 KiB  
Article
Geographies of Frontline Workers: Gender, Race, and Commuting in New York City
by Sara McLafferty and Valerie Preston
Sustainability 2023, 15(4), 3429; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15043429 - 13 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1469
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic amplified social, economic, and environmental inequalities in American cities, including inequities in commuting and access to employment. Frontline workers—those who had to work on site during the pandemic—experienced these inequalities in every aspect of their daily lives. We examine the [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic amplified social, economic, and environmental inequalities in American cities, including inequities in commuting and access to employment. Frontline workers—those who had to work on site during the pandemic—experienced these inequalities in every aspect of their daily lives. We examine the labor force characteristics and commuting of frontline workers in New York City with a focus on gender and race/ethnic disparities in wages and commuting modes and times. Using Census PUMS microdata for a sample of New York City residents in the 2015–2019 period, we identify frontline workers from detailed industry and occupation codes and compare characteristics of frontline workers with those of essential workers who could work remotely. The data highlight wide disparities between frontline and remote workers. Minority men and women are concentrated in the frontline workforce. The residential geographies of frontline and remote workers differ greatly, with the former concentrated in low- and moderate- income areas distant from work sites and with long commute times. Compared to men, women frontline workers rely heavily on public transit to commute and transit dependence is highest among Black and Latina women. Low-wage employment, long commute times, and transit dependence intersected to increase minority women’s economic and social vulnerability during the pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Economic Geography)
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23 pages, 2399 KiB  
Article
Analyzing Express Revenue Spatial Association Network’s Characteristics and Effects: A Case Study of 31 Provinces in China
by Guipu Wang, Jianyu Yang and Fangtang Xu
Sustainability 2023, 15(1), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15010276 - 24 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 995
Abstract
In recent years, China’s express delivery industry has experienced significant regional differences in income, which may endanger the sustainable development of the economy and affect the sustainable development of society. To study the development setup and influencing factors of the express delivery industry [...] Read more.
In recent years, China’s express delivery industry has experienced significant regional differences in income, which may endanger the sustainable development of the economy and affect the sustainable development of society. To study the development setup and influencing factors of the express delivery industry in various regions of China, based on the income data of provincial express delivery, we constructed a spatial correlation network of provincial express revenue in China using the social network analysis method and analyzed its network characteristics and evolution rules. Additionally, the relationship between network structure parameters and express revenue was tested using the spatial Durbin model. The results reveal that the spatial correlation network of China’s provincial express revenue changes from decentralization to agglomeration, and the connection between the express industry in each province is constantly strengthened. The provinces in the eastern coastal areas exhibit a higher degree of centrality and effective scale in the network, and the limit system is smaller, which indicates that these provinces have higher importance and control ability in the network. Simultaneously, a moderating effect exists between network structure parameters and express income, indicating that network structure parameters affect express income through human capital input. This study provides theoretical research and empirical support to promote the coordinated and sustainable development of the express delivery industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Economic Geography)
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19 pages, 2537 KiB  
Article
Research on the Firm Spatial Distribution and Influencing Factors of the Service-Oriented Digital Industry in Yangtze River Delta
by Jing Zhang, Yuhan Fu and Baifa Zhang
Sustainability 2022, 14(22), 14902; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142214902 - 11 Nov 2022
Viewed by 987
Abstract
Exploring the spatial distribution and influencing factors of firms’ location choices in the service-oriented digital industry is of great significance for achieving a new round of rapid development for the digital economy in the context of a post-epidemic situation. Based on the micro [...] Read more.
Exploring the spatial distribution and influencing factors of firms’ location choices in the service-oriented digital industry is of great significance for achieving a new round of rapid development for the digital economy in the context of a post-epidemic situation. Based on the micro perspective of firms, this paper explores the spatial distribution and influencing factors of the location choice of the service-oriented digital industry in the Yangtze River Delta of China. The research shows that the number of the service-oriented digital industry firms varies greatly among cities in the Yangtze River Delta region of China, showing an obvious core–periphery structure. There are many firms in municipalities directly under the central government and provincial capitals, which are the core areas; the number of firms in non-provincial capital cities is small and they are marginal areas. The influencing factors include: per capita GDP, industrial structure upgrading, whether it is a municipality directly under the Central Government or a provincial capital city, whether it has opened high-speed rail, information transmission, number of employees in the computer service industry, number of patent applications, Internet infrastructure level, and scientific fiscal expenditure have a significant positive impact on its location choice, while the per capita total social consumer goods have a significant negative impact on its location choice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Economic Geography)
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21 pages, 778 KiB  
Article
The Economies of Identities: Recognising the Economic Value of the Characteristics of Territories
by Inês Gusman and Alan Sandry
Sustainability 2022, 14(14), 8429; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14148429 - 10 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1722
Abstract
The economic relevance of the characteristics of territories has been addressed by many approaches across different disciplines. While some consider them an important source for the reputation of territories, others rely on the fact that in a global mass market the territorial embeddedness [...] Read more.
The economic relevance of the characteristics of territories has been addressed by many approaches across different disciplines. While some consider them an important source for the reputation of territories, others rely on the fact that in a global mass market the territorial embeddedness of goods and services increase their market value through the assertion of their uniqueness and authenticity. In this article we propose the integration of these different interpretations on a common framework to better understand the underlying mechanisms and processes associated with the economic consequences of those characteristics that make territories unique and form their identity. We conduct a literature review to identify basic definitions, existing methodologies and core features of the most relevant studies on the topic to provide a broad conceptual framework for the analysis and economic promotion of the identities of territories. Additionally, two illustrative case studies are presented, covering successful strategies where identities have been put in the centre of an economic development strategy: the Way of Saint James (Galicia, Spain) and the Douro Valley (Portugal). Through the lens of the reviewed concepts, both strategies are assessed. Building on a broad repertoire of research approaches and disciplines, we conclude by outlining a new research agenda on the economies of identities and stressing the potentialities and limitations of mobilising the identities of territories as a resource for economic development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Economic Geography)
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21 pages, 16284 KiB  
Article
The Dynamic Evolution of the Structure of an Urban Housing Investment Niche Network and Its Underlying Mechanisms: A Case Study of 35 Large and Medium-Sized Cities in China
by Linyan Wang, Haiqing Hu and Xianzhu Wang
Sustainability 2022, 14(6), 3523; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063523 - 17 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1902
Abstract
With the growth of urban agglomerations, the spatial diffusion of housing investment is clear; however, little research has been carried out to address its network characteristics and underlying mechanisms of influence. Using data on 35 large and medium-sized cities, this paper applies niche [...] Read more.
With the growth of urban agglomerations, the spatial diffusion of housing investment is clear; however, little research has been carried out to address its network characteristics and underlying mechanisms of influence. Using data on 35 large and medium-sized cities, this paper applies niche theory to housing investment, constructing a housing investment niche index that includes resources, the housing market, the social economy, and policy. The purpose is to study the characteristics of the network structure and its mechanisms of influence based on an improved gravity model and a temporal exponential random graph model (TERGM). Supported by the analysis of the network structure, we find that the node degree within the network is low, the network density exhibits an inverted “V” shape, and the network level suggests the existence of a “rich cities club”. According to the local network clustering analysis, the cities are divided into three clusters: the Yangtze River Delta region, the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region, and the central and eastern regions. Furthermore, analysis of the endogeneity in the structure reveals that there is a hierarchy of cities with high economic development levels, which makes it difficult to establish an investment network with strong relationships. The effects of the attributes are consistent with the predictions of location theory and new economic geography theory. The external network effects conform to the law of the general gravity model. Our research provides insights into the ways in which the misplaced competition in housing investment between cities in a region and the flow of production factors can be reasonably guided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Economic Geography)
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17 pages, 1673 KiB  
Article
Multiple Dimensions of Gender (Dis)Parity: A County-Scale Analysis of Occupational Attainment in the USA, 2019
by Madhuri Sharma
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 8915; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13168915 - 9 Aug 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1887
Abstract
Gender economic parity comprises an integral part of the United Nation’s 17 goals toward attaining sustainable development. Women have historically been confined to feminine occupations associated with lower pay, which have negatively impacted their economic wellbeing. This paper examines gendered dimensions of occupational [...] Read more.
Gender economic parity comprises an integral part of the United Nation’s 17 goals toward attaining sustainable development. Women have historically been confined to feminine occupations associated with lower pay, which have negatively impacted their economic wellbeing. This paper examines gendered dimensions of occupational (dis)parity across US counties and their association with educational attainment. Drawing on five years’ American Community Survey estimates (2015–2019) data from the National Historical Geographic Information System, I conduct descriptive statistical analysis of occupation-based location quotients and education, followed by an in-depth share analysis of 26 gender-based sub-categories of occupations. The correlation analysis provides insights into the multiple dimensions of gendered inequalities. Women’s largest engagements still include sales/office (28.66%), service (21.15%), and education/legal/community-service/arts/media (15.03%)—accounting toward 65% of all employed women in the US. Women majoring in science/engineering and related disciplines are still the lowest, which manifests into their alarmingly lower representations in science/engineering and related occupations. This suggests strategic policy interventions to advance women in STEM education. This analysis, however, also suggests occupational parity for women with a master’s education and above who share almost similar types of relationships with major categories of occupations, even though the coefficients are more favorable for males in managerial jobs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Economic Geography)
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12 pages, 409 KiB  
Article
Gendered Dimensions of Unpaid Activities: An Empirical Insight into Rural Bangladesh Households
by Faisal Bin Islam and Madhuri Sharma
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6670; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126670 - 11 Jun 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2900
Abstract
Women in Bangladesh are generally perceived as caregivers, often confined within the households to perform various activities, whereas men are perceived as the providers. These complex gendered roles intersect with multiple factors such as household structure, marital status, religion, cultural beliefs, economic shocks, [...] Read more.
Women in Bangladesh are generally perceived as caregivers, often confined within the households to perform various activities, whereas men are perceived as the providers. These complex gendered roles intersect with multiple factors such as household structure, marital status, religion, cultural beliefs, economic shocks, and livelihood opportunities. This study used the feminist political ecology framework to contextualize and analyze time allocated toward unpaid works, culturally accepted as female/gendered activities, and the nuanced power dynamics between men and women within the rural households of Bangladesh. We used the household survey data collected from the Bangladesh Integrated Household Survey of 2015 to create a multiple linear regression model that helps understand the impacts of economic, cultural, and environmental shocks on the total time allocated toward unpaid activities by women within the household. Results suggest women who experienced climate-change shocks such as crop losses due to disasters and non-climatic shocks such as dowry tend to allocate more time toward unpaid tasks. In contrast, women who own their businesses tend to give less time toward unpaid tasks. This study provides guidelines for necessary gender-sensitive national policies to address the United Nation’s goal of gender equity and sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Economic Geography)
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