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Nanoscience and Nanotechnology for Resource Recovery: Alternative Energies and Sustainable Wastewater Remediation Processes

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 7239

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Group of Materials for Medicine and Biotechnology, Institute of Materials Science of Madrid (ICMM/CSIC), 28045 Madrid, Spain
Interests: nanoscience; nanotechnology; environmental chemical engineering; magnetic nanoparticles; wastewater treatment; heterogeneous catalysis; adsorption; advanced oxidation processes; resource recovery; alternative energies

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Guest Editor
1. Group of Materials for Medicine and Biotechnology, Institute of Materials Science of Madrid (ICMM/CSIC), 28045 Madrid, Spain
2. General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Dr. Esquerdo, 46, 28007 Madrid, Spain
Interests: magnetism; plasmonics; magnetic nanoparticles; catalytic process; water remediation; nanotoxicity; medical imaging; cancer therapies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past few decades, there has been increasing concern about the continuous degradation of the environment by anthropogenic and industrial activities. Modern society needs cutting-edge technological innovations that will boost industry productivity as well as environmental sustainability. Nanotechnology represents the next wave of scientific and engineering innovation, and will have a profound impact on a variety of industries, including the environment, aerospace, energy, information technology, medical, and transportation fields. Particularly, it is anticipated that using engineered nanomaterials will have a positive impact on sustainability and the environment by lowering the production of hazardous waste and energy use. This global “nanorevolution” considers that engineered nanomaterials are becoming a hot topic for environmental applications, including in water purification and resource recovery.

This Special Issue aims to bring together valuable scientific publications on how nanotechnological solutions could be applied, or are currently being used, in resource recovery technologies, wastewater environmental remediation, and clean energy production. We invite the submission of original research articles and reviews that address one or more of (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • Design of nanomaterials for environmental applications;
  • Green synthesis of nanomaterials;
  • Nanotechnological solutions for the environment;
  • Sustainable water purification technologies based on nanomaterials;
  • Innovative nanotechnological processes for wastewater remediation;
  • Heavy metal removal;
  • Organic matter degradation;
  • Nanosensors for monitoring water quality;
  • Efficient waste recovery and reuse using engineered nanomaterials;
  • Revalorization of wastes;
  • Nanocatalysts for alternative energies;
  • Nanostructured solar panels;
  • Energy storage;
  • Novel energy sources.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Alvaro Gallo Cordova
Dr. Jesús G. Ovejero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanotechnology
  • adsorption
  • advanced oxidation
  • water treatment
  • wastewater treatment
  • resource recovery
  • hazardous wastes
  • revalorization
  • alternative energies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 3315 KiB  
Article
Novel Synthesis of Carbon Dots from Coconut Wastes and Its Potential as Water Disinfectant
by Subramani Krishnaraj Rajkishore, Krishnagounder Padmanaban Devadharshini, Ponnuraj Sathya Moorthy, Vanniya Sreeramulu Reddy Kiran Kalyan, Rajkishore Sunitha, Mohan Prasanthrajan, Muthunalliappan Maheswari, Kizhaeral Sevathapandian Subramanian, Nalliappan Sakthivel and Ruben Sakrabani
Sustainability 2023, 15(14), 10924; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151410924 - 12 Jul 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2494
Abstract
This paper presents a facile and effective method for the large-scale production of carbon dots (CDs) from diverse coconut wastes (fronds, husk and shell). On comparing two different methods, namely (i) hydrothermal carbonization and (ii) novel sequential synthesis processes (pyrolysis followed by sonication), [...] Read more.
This paper presents a facile and effective method for the large-scale production of carbon dots (CDs) from diverse coconut wastes (fronds, husk and shell). On comparing two different methods, namely (i) hydrothermal carbonization and (ii) novel sequential synthesis processes (pyrolysis followed by sonication), the latter procedure recorded a higher recovery of CDs (14.0%) over the hydrothermal method (2.33%). Doping agents such as urea, polyethyleneimine (PEI) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) were chosen at varying concentrations to synthesize surface-modified CDs (SMCDs) for enhanced antibacterial properties. Among these SMCDs, urea-doped CDs (1:1) @ 1000 ppm registered significantly higher cytotoxicity (20.6%) against Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, to assess the applicability of CDs as a disinfectant in water purification systems, two products, namely (i) CD-infused chitosan beads and (ii) pelletized CDs, were developed to ensure the immobilization of CDs. Studies with lab-scale prototypes have revealed that CDs infused chitosan beads reduced the colonies of E. coli from 5.41 × 102 CFU/mL (control group) to 2.16 × 102 CFU/mL, in comparison with pelletized CDs that decreased to 3.30 × 102 CFU/mL. The biosafety of CDs was assessed against Eisenia fetida for 21 days, and the observations revealed no mortality, even at 2000 ppm. Overall, this research demonstrated that a waste biomass can be effectively transformed into a novel water disinfectant. Furthermore, this scientific endeavor opens up research avenues to evolve advanced water purifiers using low-cost and eco-friendly nanomaterials. Full article
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13 pages, 2939 KiB  
Article
Chemical Recycling of Used Motor Oil by Catalytic Cracking with Metal-Doped Aluminum Silicate Catalysts
by Daniela Almeida Streitwieser, Arturo Arteaga, Alvaro Gallo-Cordova, Alexis Hidrobo and Sebastian Ponce
Sustainability 2023, 15(13), 10522; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151310522 - 4 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1637
Abstract
The chemical recycling of used motor oil via catalytic cracking to convert it into secondary diesel-like fuels is a sustainable and technically attractive solution for managing environmental concerns associated with traditional disposal. In this context, this study was conducted to screen basic and [...] Read more.
The chemical recycling of used motor oil via catalytic cracking to convert it into secondary diesel-like fuels is a sustainable and technically attractive solution for managing environmental concerns associated with traditional disposal. In this context, this study was conducted to screen basic and acidic-aluminum silicate catalysts doped with different metals, including Mg, Zn, Cu, and Ni. The catalysts were thoroughly characterized using various techniques such as N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, FT-IR spectroscopy, and TG analysis. The liquid and gaseous products were identified using GC, and their characteristics were compared with acceptable ranges from ASTM characterization methods for diesel fuel. The results showed that metal doping improved the performance of the catalysts, resulting in higher conversion rates of up to 65%, compared to thermal (15%) and aluminum silicates (≈20%). Among all catalysts, basic aluminum silicates doped with Ni showed the best catalytic performance, with conversions and yields three times higher than aluminum silicate catalysts. These findings significantly contribute to developing efficient and eco-friendly processes for the chemical recycling of used motor oil. This study highlights the potential of basic aluminum silicates doped with Ni as a promising catalyst for catalytic cracking and encourages further research in this area. Full article
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Review

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18 pages, 5444 KiB  
Review
Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles Mediated by Deep Eutectic Solvents and Their Applications in Water Treatment
by Sebastian Ponce, Herman A. Murillo, Frank Alexis, José Alvarez-Barreto and José R. Mora
Sustainability 2023, 15(12), 9703; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15129703 - 17 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2314
Abstract
The use of environmentally friendly deep eutectic solvents (DES) in green synthesis of different types of nanoparticles has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The application of these materials in water treatment, mainly by adsorption or degradation, is emerging as a sustainable alternative [...] Read more.
The use of environmentally friendly deep eutectic solvents (DES) in green synthesis of different types of nanoparticles has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The application of these materials in water treatment, mainly by adsorption or degradation, is emerging as a sustainable alternative to conventional methodologies. However, the information about the green synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) using DES is dispersed in the literature. This review is focused on compiling and systematizing information regarding DES-mediated NP synthesis, the application of these NPs in water treatment, and future perspectives of these technologies. DES represent an excellent alternative to traditional solvents in NP synthesis due to their low toxicity, low cost, and being environmentally friendly. The possible NP surface functionalization with DES is also attractive as it plays a pivotal role in processes related to water treatment. Modification and synthesis of carbon nanotubes, graphene oxides, magnetic iron oxides, among others, for the adsorption and degradation of organic dyes, pharmaceuticals, metal ions, herbicides, pesticides, and other water contaminants found in recent literature are presented in this work. Finally, the possibility to control NP size and shape can be helpful in the design of new materials for a specific application. Full article
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