sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Resources and Sustainable Utilization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 51594

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Chemical Engineering and Engineering Sustainability, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Open University of Cyprus, Giannou Kranidioti 89, Latsia, Nicosia 2231, Cyprus
Interests: strategic planning development; circular economy; zero-waste approach; waste prevention; circular and bio-economy and industrial symbiosis; management and treatment of solid waste; end of waste criteria; hazardous waste; environmental impact and environmental risk assessment analysis; life cycle assessment; sustainable development goals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), Université de Haute-Alsace, CNRS, UMR 7361, 68093 Mulhouse, France
Interests: biomass valorization: pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of different biomasses, including agriculture residues and agro-industrial by-products; thermal degradation mechanisms and kinetics; gas emission analysis; exhaust gas treatment: exhaust gas treatment in fixed and mobile sources; NOx and soot abatement; volatile organic compound elimination
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail
Guest Editor
Benaki Phytopathological Institute, Department of Phytopathology, Kifissia, Greece
Interests: Maria Doula is a chemist, holding M.Sc and PhD degree on Chemical Technology in the field of soil management and pollution. She is an Associate Researcher, Head of the Laboratory of Non-Parasitic Diseases, in the Benaki Phytopathological Institute, in Greece, and also collaborating academic staff of the Open University of Cyprus. Dr. Doula has published 38 peer-reviewed papers in peer-reviewed journals, more than 80 announcements in international conferences and 7 book chapters on environmental quality, soil science, waste management and reuse in agriculture, sustainable agriculture, climate change. She participated in EU projects as coordinator or member of project team. Her research work has gained international acceptance and the citations of her published work are more than 1000.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Waste (manly solid, but also liquid) is considered to be one of the main environmental issues nowadays, although it has a strong relation with social dimensions and economy (locally or globally). There are several targets to be reached from member states in the entire EU and, moreover, globally. A circular economy aims to boost the recycling community, and comprises a common EU target for recycling at least 55% of municipal waste by 2025 (this target will rise to 60% by 2030 and 65% by 2035). Hence, the envisaged common EU target for recycling is 65% of packaging waste by 2025, and 70% by 2030. There would be separate targets for specific material i.e., all packaging up to 70%, plastics up to 55% etc by 2030. Moreover, a circular economy aims to introduce end-waste criteria (EWC) and quality protocols. EWC would consider materials non-waste across the EU, and would prevent the case by case classification of items/materials as waste, unless at some point it again meets the specific waste definition. To implement any waste solution, strategies related to the prevention, reuse, recycling, energy recovering, extract of high added value products, etc., must be developed. These strategies aim to grow quality of life and changed the way that residents react in the framework of waste management, in order to reduce the effect of several processes on the environment through product, processes, and corporate policies, using green applicable sustainable resources and environmental management. This Special Issue will collect papers world-wide related to strategy development, and adopted from many countries and urban areas in the framework of waste management (solid and liquid). The entire Special Issue will be useful for any one related to waste management, i.e., policy makers, consultants, engineers, scientist, academics, etc.

References:

Neoklis Antoniou, Antonis A. Zorpas (2019). Quality Protocol Development to define End-of-Waste Criteria for Tire Pyrolysis Oil in the framework of Circularl Economy Strategy. Waste Management, 95, 161-170 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2019.05.035.

Pantelitsa Loizia, Niki Neofytou, Antonis A. Zorpas (2018) The concept of circular economy in food waste management for the optimization of energy production through UASB reactor. Environmental Science and Pollution research, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-3519-4.

Antonis A. Zorpas, Katia Lasaridi, Diana-Mihaela Pociovălişteanu, Pantelista Loizia (2018) Household compost monitoring and evaluation in the framework of waste prevention strategy. Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol 172, pp 3567-3577, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.03.155.

Amel Ibn Ferjani, Mejdi Jeguirim, Salah Jellali, Lionel Limousy, Claire Courson, Hanène Akrout, Nicolas Thevenin, Lionel Ruidavets, Simona Bennici, The use of exhausted grape marc to produce biofuels and biofertilizers: Effect of pyrolysis temperatures on biochars properties, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2019 (107) 425-433.

Khouloud Haddad, Mejdi Jeguirim, Boutheina Jerbi, Ajmia Chouchene, Patrick Dutournié, Nicolas Thevenin, Lionel Ruidavets, Salah Jellali, Lionel Limousy, Olive Mill Wastewater: From a Pollutant to Green Fuels, Agricultural Water Source and Biofertilizer, ACS Sustainable Chem. Eng, 2017, 5, 8988–8996.

Assist. Prof. Dr. Antonis A. Zorpas
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Maria K. Doula
Dr. Antonis A. Zorpas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • waste strategies
  • circular economy
  • strategic planning development
  • LCA industrial symbiosis
  • waste pyrolysis
  • waste valorization
  • food waste management
  • attitude and behavior
  • high added value products
  • critical minerals
  • WEEE
  • liquid waste reused and recycling
  • biosolid management
  • bioeconomy

Published Papers (15 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

5 pages, 204 KiB  
Editorial
Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy
by Antonis A. Zorpas, Maria K. Doula and Mejdi Jeguirim
Sustainability 2021, 13(23), 13467; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313467 - 06 Dec 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 1792
Abstract
Current studies proposed that more that 2bn tons of solid waste/year are produced globally [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

14 pages, 617 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Determinants of Greek Households Food Waste Prevention Behaviour
by Theodora Kritikou, Dimosthenis Panagiotakos, Konstantinos Abeliotis and Katia Lasaridi
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11451; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011451 - 16 Oct 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2751
Abstract
Food waste prevention is globally an urgent policy priority. Multiple studies have demonstrated that in the developed world, households are the main producers of food waste along the food supply chain, being responsible for about half of the edible food wasted. This study [...] Read more.
Food waste prevention is globally an urgent policy priority. Multiple studies have demonstrated that in the developed world, households are the main producers of food waste along the food supply chain, being responsible for about half of the edible food wasted. This study aims to analyse consumers’ food waste behaviour and identify the factors that influence food waste generation in Greek households. A survey of 921 Greek households was conducted using a structured questionnaire based on the explanatory framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, which is currently the most widely used cognitive model in environmental psychology. The study investigated the validity of relations between the main model parameters (attitude towards food waste, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, intention, and self-reported behaviour), in addition to knowledge regarding food waste prevention, general environmental knowledge, planning and shopping habits and demographic characteristics. Results demonstrated that food waste prevention Intention and food provisioning habits are direct determinants of food waste generation Behaviour. Intention was predominantly determined by General Environmental Attitude, followed by Perceived Behavioural Control, Attitude towards Food Waste, and Consequences/Outcomes of waste prevention, while Subjective Norms did not exert a statistically significant influence, indicating that formal and informal environmental education can positively influence food waste prevention behaviour through a combination of experiential actions and instruction. The findings of the study can inform policymaking and support the development of effective campaigns for food waste prevention at the consumption stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 2503 KiB  
Article
Sea Level Rise Mitigation by Global Sea Water Desalination Using Renewable-Energy-Powered Plants
by Muna Hindiyeh, Aiman Albatayneh, Rashed Altarawneh, Mustafa Jaradat, Murad Al-Omary, Qasem Abdelal, Tarek Tayara, Osama Khalil, Adel Juaidi, Ramez Abdallah, Partick Dutournié and Mejdi Jeguirim
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9552; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13179552 - 25 Aug 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3843
Abstract
This work suggests a solution for preventing/eliminating the predicted Sea Level Rise (SLR) by seawater desalination and storage through a large number of desalination plants distributed worldwide; it also comprises that the desalinated seawater can resolve the global water scarcity by complete coverage [...] Read more.
This work suggests a solution for preventing/eliminating the predicted Sea Level Rise (SLR) by seawater desalination and storage through a large number of desalination plants distributed worldwide; it also comprises that the desalinated seawater can resolve the global water scarcity by complete coverage for global water demand. Sea level rise can be prevented by desalinating the additional water accumulated into oceans annually for human consumption, while the excess amount of water can be stored in dams and lakes. It is predicted that SLR can be prevented by desalination plants. The chosen desalination plants for the study were Multi-Effect Desalination (MED) and Reverse Osmosis (RO) plants that are powered by renewable energy using wind and solar technologies. It is observed that the two main goals of the study are fulfilled when preventing an SLR between 1.0 m and 1.3 m by 2100 through seawater desalination, as the amount of desalinated water within that range can cover the global water demand while being economically viable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 681 KiB  
Article
Study on Compulsory Classification Management and Behavior Synergy of Municipal Solid Waste
by Tiening Cui, Xiabing Su and Yunjia Zhang
Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 6265; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13116265 - 01 Jun 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3527
Abstract
There is a general phenomenon of incoordination between garbage classification management and participation behavior, which seriously affects the sustainable management efficiency of domestic garbage. In order to solve this problem, this paper introduced the subject-object-process model into the waste classification management system, and [...] Read more.
There is a general phenomenon of incoordination between garbage classification management and participation behavior, which seriously affects the sustainable management efficiency of domestic garbage. In order to solve this problem, this paper introduced the subject-object-process model into the waste classification management system, and constructed a mandatory classification management model of municipal solid waste and a comprehensive evaluation index system. Taking Beijing, China, as an example, the coupling coordination degree of garbage classification behaviors of residents in different was compared, and the coordination status of household waste management and behaviors was obtained. The results show that the synergy between government management and residents’ household waste classification behavior is between 0.40 and 0.68, and the synergy between enterprises’ participation in governance and residents’ behavior is between 0.45 and 0.75. The coordination degree between domestic waste management and residents’ participation behavior is generally in primary coordination or slight imbalance. The synergy degree between the secondary indicators of domestic waste management and residents’ behavior is higher than that of the tertiary indicators. Superposition effect of integrated management measures is better; among the psychological factors affecting residents’ classification behavior, the awareness rate and recognition degree of waste classification are very high, the awareness of environmental responsibility and social pressure are lagging behind. The study of synergy under the framework of subject-object-process not only quantifies the overall synergy between management and residents’ behavior, but also provides a method to further implement garbage classification management in a targeted manner. Based on the synergy analysis, according to the weak links of various regions, classified management is carried out around publicity and education, supervision and management, assessment, rewards and punishments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 1655 KiB  
Article
Investigations on Biogas Recovery from Anaerobic Digestion of Raw Sludge and Its Mixture with Agri-Food Wastes: Application to the Largest Industrial Estate in Oman
by Salah Jellali, Yassine Charabi, Muhammad Usman, Abdullah Al-Badi and Mejdi Jeguirim
Sustainability 2021, 13(7), 3698; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13073698 - 26 Mar 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2247
Abstract
This work is intended to evaluate the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of converting the sludge produced at an industrial estate’s wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Oman into energy through anaerobic digestion (AD). In this study, three different scenarios were analyzed. They concerned [...] Read more.
This work is intended to evaluate the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of converting the sludge produced at an industrial estate’s wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Oman into energy through anaerobic digestion (AD). In this study, three different scenarios were analyzed. They concerned the digestion of the total amount of the produced sludge alone (240 m3 day−1) (scenario 1), and its co-digestion with wet agri-food wastes (AFW) at rates of two tonnes day−1 (scenario 2) and ten tonnes day−1 (scenario 3). Based on the analyses of sludge samples, an intensive literature review regarding sludge and AFW Physico-chemical and energetic characteristics and the use of the cost–benefit analysis (CBA) approach, it was found that, for the overall duration of the project (20 years), the AD of the sludge alone (scenario 1) permitted the production of 43.9 GWh of electricity, the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (more than 37,000 tonnes equivalent CO2 (TCO2)) and exhibited positive net present value (NPV: $393,483) and an internal return rate (IRR) of 19.4%. Co-digesting sludge with AFW significantly increased all of these key performance indicators. For instance, scenario 3 results in the recovery of electrical energy of 82.2 GWh and avoids the emission of 70,602 tCO2. Moreover, a higher NPV and IRR of $851,876 and 21.8%, respectively, and a payback period (PBP) of only seven years were calculated. The sensitivity analysis revealed that a decrease in total expenses by 15% results in a significant increase of the NPV and the IRR to $1,418,704 and 33.9%, respectively, for scenario 3. Considering a pessimistic assumption (an increase of the total expenses by 15%), all studied scenarios remain attractive. For instance, for scenario 3, the NPV, IRR, and PBP were evaluated to $285,047, 13.5%, and 9 years, respectively. Therefore, the co-digestion of sludge with agri-food wastes for energy recovery purposes could be considered a promising, eco-friendly, and economically viable approach in the Omani industrial estates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 17322 KiB  
Article
Assessing Soil and Crop Characteristics at Sub-Field Level Using Unmanned Aerial System and Geospatial Analysis
by Antonis V. Papadopoulos and Dionissios P. Kalivas
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2855; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052855 - 06 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1816
Abstract
Practicing agriculture is a multiparametric and for this reason demanding task. It involves the management of many factors and thorough strategic planning in a highly variable and uncertain environment. Crop production is a function of agricultural practices as applied in natural resources, such [...] Read more.
Practicing agriculture is a multiparametric and for this reason demanding task. It involves the management of many factors and thorough strategic planning in a highly variable and uncertain environment. Crop production is a function of agricultural practices as applied in natural resources, such as soil and plants. When referring to conventional agriculture, variability in these resources is neglected, as any field is treated homogenously. On the other hand, site-specific crop management, which was promoted through the advance of technologies, regarding collecting and analyzing data and applying agricultural decisions at a sub-field level, considers field spatial and temporal variations. Localizing inputs in a field rationalizes agricultural waste management and offers promising perspectives towards a circular economy. In this context, two cotton fields in central Greece were selected for this study. During the growing period, reflectance data were acquired, before planting at the end of April, and 100 days after planting at the end of July, with a commercial unmanned aerial system (UAS). The fields were grid sampled for soil (clay content, pH, calcium carbonate percentage, organic matter, total nitrogen, and electrical conductivity) and plant properties (total nitrogen, potassium, iron, copper, and zinc) determination. All data were manipulated through geographical information systems (GIS) and further participated in principal component analysis (PCA) application. PCA revealed important relations and groupings between soil reflectance and organic matter, carbonates, and clay content in both fields (72 to 87% of the total variance in the initial parameters was explained by the extracted components). However, in plant data, the resulting components accounted for less variability in initial data (62 to 72%). PCA resulting scores were introduced in the Fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm, which categorized sub-areas of the fields into two discrete zones per field. Zoning, in the case of soil properties, was accompanied with the statistically important (p < 0.01) discrimination of the mean values (except for total nitrogen and pH), implicating a promising zonal management scheme. The zone delineation process regarding plant properties yielded areas that did not share statistically significant variations, except for the mean values of iron concentration (p < 0.01). According to the results, spatial variations were revealed across the fields, mostly in soil properties, which can be directly monitored through aerial reflectance data. The applied methodology can be used in extension services or by agronomists for producing fertilizer application maps. Further, when integrated with a broader spatial decision support system, it can be used by policy makers for adapting circular economy strategies in crop production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 7930 KiB  
Article
Measuring the Level of Environmental Performance on Coastal Environment before and during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Case Study from Cyprus
by Pantelitsa Loizia, Irene Voukkali, Georgia Chatziparaskeva, Jose Navarro-Pedreño and Antonis A. Zorpas
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2485; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052485 - 25 Feb 2021
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 4565
Abstract
Tourism activities are considered, among others, the backbone of the local economies. However, tourism activities lead to adverse environmental impacts, especially in coastal zones. Coastal areas are considered and recognized as of strategic importance due to the fact that several activities take place, [...] Read more.
Tourism activities are considered, among others, the backbone of the local economies. However, tourism activities lead to adverse environmental impacts, especially in coastal zones. Coastal areas are considered and recognized as of strategic importance due to the fact that several activities take place, from leisure to business. At the same time, coastal areas are under pressure from tourist activities, and the waste generated is a very serious issue. Therefore, there are limited studies related to the environmental dimensions of the COVID-19 pandemic in the coastal environment. This paper provides answers to the hypothesis that the pandemic lockdown scenario would improve environmental performance due to reduced usage and, therefore, waste, taking into account specific key performance indicators (KPIs) as these KPIs are used to evaluate the performance of an area. The results showed that the study area improved, as did the selected KPIs, i.e., clean coast index (CCI), waste accumulation rate (WAR), and waste accumulation index (WAI). Additionally, according to the final results, the concentration of micro-, meso- and macroplastics on the beach reduced, and the main issues remained the solutions on cigarette butts, straws, and other plastic containers. Furthermore, the final results are considered very useful to local authorities, stakeholders, consultants, policymakers, and any other competent authorities, to reschedule their waste management strategies, to improve waste infrastructures and their level of services (LOS), as well as, to suggest frequent awareness-raising activities to their visitors on how to protect the coastal environment, taking into account a pandemic scenario, as well as, the policy alternative impacts on EU coastal zones 2000–2050. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 2673 KiB  
Article
Static and Dynamic Investigations on Leaching/Retention of Nutrients from Raw Poultry Manure Biochars and Amended Agricultural Soil
by Samar Hadroug, Salah Jellali, Mejdi Jeguirim, Marzena Kwapinska, Helmi Hamdi, James J. Leahy and Witold Kwapinski
Sustainability 2021, 13(3), 1212; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031212 - 24 Jan 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2407
Abstract
In this study, nutrients release/adsorption from/by raw poultry manure-derived biochar produced at a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C (RPM-B) was assessed under static and dynamic conditions. Batch sequential leaching experiments of RPM-B for a total contact time of 10 days showed that both [...] Read more.
In this study, nutrients release/adsorption from/by raw poultry manure-derived biochar produced at a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C (RPM-B) was assessed under static and dynamic conditions. Batch sequential leaching experiments of RPM-B for a total contact time of 10 days showed that both phosphorus and potassium were slowly released but with higher amounts compared to various other animal- and lignocellulosic-derived biochars. The cumulated released P and K amounts were assessed to 93.6 and 17.1 mg g−1, which represent about 95% and 43% of their original contents in the RPM-B, respectively. The column combined leaching/adsorption experiments showed that amending an alkaline sandy agricultural soil with two doses of RPM-B (at 5% and 8% w:w) resulted in an efficient retention of NO3-N and NH4-N, and on the contrary, important leached amounts of PO4-P, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ but with relatively slow kinetic release rates for a long period. Even after 40 days of dynamic leaching, these latter nutrients continued to be released with kinetic rates lower than 10 mg kg−1 d−1. Thus, compared to synthetic fertilizers, RPM-B valorization as organic amendment for poor semiarid soils could be considered as an attractive, eco-friendly, and sustainable waste recycling option. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 5385 KiB  
Article
Measurements of Local Sources of Particulates with a Portable Monitor along the Coast of an Insular City
by Christos Petsas, Marinos Stylianou, Antonis Zorpas and Agapios Agapiou
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 261; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010261 - 30 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2685
Abstract
The air quality of modern cities is considered an important factor for the quality of life of humans and therefore is being safeguarded by various international organizations, concentrating on the mass concentration of particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10, [...] Read more.
The air quality of modern cities is considered an important factor for the quality of life of humans and therefore is being safeguarded by various international organizations, concentrating on the mass concentration of particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10, 2.5 and 1 μm. However, the different physical and anthropogenic processes and activities within the city contribute to the rise of fine (<1 μm) and coarse (>1 μm) particles, directly impacting human health and the environment. In order to monitor certain natural and anthropogenic events, suspecting their significant contribution to PM concentrations, seven different events taking place on the coastal front of the city of Limassol (Cyprus) were on-site monitored using a portable PM instrument; these included both natural (e.g., dust event) and anthropogenic (e.g., cement factory, meat festival, tall building construction, tire factory, traffic jam, dust road) emissions taking place in spring and summer periods. The violations of the limits that were noticed were attributed mainly to the various anthropogenic activities taking place on-site, revealing once more the need for further research and continuous monitoring of air quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1362 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Viticulture: First Determination of the Environmental Footprint of Grapes
by Vassilis Litskas, Athanasia Mandoulaki, Ioannis N. Vogiatzakis, Nikolaos Tzortzakis and Menelaos Stavrinides
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8812; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218812 - 23 Oct 2020
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 3906
Abstract
We present for the first time the environmental footprint (EF) of grapes following the methodology proposed by the EU and life cycle assessment (LCA). We used data from three different production systems, conventional high- or low-input and organic from vineyards on the Mediterranean [...] Read more.
We present for the first time the environmental footprint (EF) of grapes following the methodology proposed by the EU and life cycle assessment (LCA). We used data from three different production systems, conventional high- or low-input and organic from vineyards on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus. The life cycle inventory (LCI) data were retrieved from the recently released AGRIBALYSE database, and the EF was determined with the Open LCA software. The system boundary was from “cradle to winery door” and the functional unit was 1 ton of grapes delivered to the winery. Organic grape production had the lowest values for most of the 16 EF impact categories. Machinery, fuel, and sulfur production and use were identified as EF hotspots for organic grapes. Fertilizer production and use were identified as EF hotspots for high-input grape production. The EF impact category values for low-input grapes showed similarities with organic production. Future research needs to enrich the LCI databases with data more applicable to the methods and inputs applied in Mediterranean agriculture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 768 KiB  
Article
New Integrated Approaches to Climate Emergency Landscape Strategies: The Case of Pan-European SATURN Project
by Anastasia Nikologianni, Alessandro Betta, Angelica Pianegonda, Sara Favargiotti, Kathryn Moore, Nick Grayson, Elisa Morganti, Martin Berg, Anna Ternell, Marco Ciolli, Michela Angeli, Anders M. Nilsson and Alessandro Gretter
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8419; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208419 - 13 Oct 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2833
Abstract
The landscape has been described as a ‘blind spot’ when examined in light of regional strategies. The immense potential of peri-urban and rural hinterlands to counter the climate emergency is therefore also overlooked. The European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT)Climate-KIC’s (Knowledge and [...] Read more.
The landscape has been described as a ‘blind spot’ when examined in light of regional strategies. The immense potential of peri-urban and rural hinterlands to counter the climate emergency is therefore also overlooked. The European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT)Climate-KIC’s (Knowledge and Innovation Community) System and sustainable Approach to virTuous interaction of Urban and Rural LaNdscapes (SATURN) aims to address this short-sightedness. The reason why we do not see or value the landscape is complex, but part of the problem relates to its multiple ownership, numerous types and scales of conflicting designations, governance structures, policy requirements, and regulatory frameworks. This leads to an approach that is fragmented and sectoral and, therefore, fails to see the bigger picture or recognise the value that the territory has in order to deal with current environmental challenges. With partners from across Europe, the pan-European Orchestrated Ecosystem research project co-funded by EIT Climate-KIC, SATURN aims to develop new integrated strategies which will increase awareness of the capacity of the landscape, which is seen is seen as a vital way to address the deepening climate emergency. SATURN anticipates that the outputs will build capacity across Europe to help nation-states meet the 2030 UN Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDGs) and respond to the environmental challenges. This paper, reporting on interim findings, sets out the next phase of the project and concludes with lessons learned so far, including an initial identification of processes that can be applied in regions across Europe and an evaluation of the significance of exchanging knowledge between different countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 310 KiB  
Article
Potential for Production of Biochar-Based Fertilizers from Olive Mill Waste in Mediterranean Basin Countries: An Initial Assessment for Spain, Tunisia, and Greece
by Evan A.N. Marks, Vasiliki Kinigopoulou, Hanene Akrout, Ahmed Amine Azzaz, Charalampos Doulgeris, Salah Jellali, Carlos Rad, Paula Sánchez Zulueta, Evangelos Tziritis, Leila El-Bassi, Camélia Matei Ghimbeu and Mejdi Jeguirim
Sustainability 2020, 12(15), 6081; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12156081 - 29 Jul 2020
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 3887
Abstract
Olive mill wastes continue to be a management challenge due to the large volumes produced, particularly due to their toxicity and impacts on the environment. Thermal conversion through pyrolysis or hydrothermal carbonization techniques can detoxify wastes while conserving nutrient contents. In this work, [...] Read more.
Olive mill wastes continue to be a management challenge due to the large volumes produced, particularly due to their toxicity and impacts on the environment. Thermal conversion through pyrolysis or hydrothermal carbonization techniques can detoxify wastes while conserving nutrient contents. In this work, we produced up-to-date data on olive mill waste flows in Spain, Tunisia, and Greece and characterized representative samples in the laboratory. Assays of thermal conversion of olive mill wastewaters and solid wastes were also performed to understand biochar yields and final properties, and the total quantities of nutrients contained were estimated. Of particular note were the quantities of potassium in Tunisian wastewaters, representing 0.6% of the total mass and an annual flow of approximately 5000 t, and in the Spanish solid wastes, an average of 1.7% of the total mass is potassium, representing an annual flow of approximately 23,000 t. Concerning phosphorus, Spanish solid wastes had the highest contents (0.1%), double that of other countries’ wastes. Annually, olive mill wastes from the three countries are estimated to contain approximately 35 × 103 tons of potassium and 2.6 × 103 tons of phosphorus. With this resource converted to biochar, each year more than 700 km2 of soils could be enriched in 0.2% carbon with biochar at an application rate of 7 t ha−1. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
16 pages, 1708 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Electrochemical Methods for Poultry Slaughterhouse Wastewater Treatment
by Kulyash Meiramkulova, Zhanar Jakupova, Duman Orynbekov, Erbolat Tashenov, Aliya Kydyrbekova, Timoth Mkilima and Vassilis J. Inglezakis
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 5110; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12125110 - 23 Jun 2020
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 3179
Abstract
Understanding the efficiency of different wastewater treatment technologies tested under real conditions is essential for successful decision making by engineers and managers. In this study, real poultry slaughterhouse wastewater coming from defeathering, cooling, and evisceration processes was treated using a lab-scale electrochemical process [...] Read more.
Understanding the efficiency of different wastewater treatment technologies tested under real conditions is essential for successful decision making by engineers and managers. In this study, real poultry slaughterhouse wastewater coming from defeathering, cooling, and evisceration processes was treated using a lab-scale electrochemical process by use of iron-iron (Fe-Fe), iron-graphite (Fe-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) electrode combinations. A water quality index (WQI) was developed and used as a tool for evaluating and classifying the effectiveness of different electrode combinations. The Al-Gr electrode combination showed an impressive performance achieving an “excellent” status for all of the three studied sources of wastewater with a WQI ranging from 13 to 34. The Fe-Gr electrode combination showed an “excellent” status performance for the wastewater from the cooling process as classified by the WQI and “good water” class for the defeathering and evisceration processes. The lower performance, which was highly affected by the increase in turbidity, was observed for the Fe-Fe electrode combination with a “poor water” status for the wastewater coming from defeathering and cooling processes and “good water” status for evisceration process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2128 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Scale on the Performance of an Integrated Poultry Slaughterhouse Wastewater Treatment Process
by Kulyash Meiramkulova, Antonis A. Zorpas, Duman Orynbekov, Michal Zhumagulov, Gulnur Saspugayeva, Aliya Kydyrbekova, Timoth Mkilima and Vassilis J. Inglezakis
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4679; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114679 - 08 Jun 2020
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 3661
Abstract
The efficiency of a wastewater treatment process may be affected by several factors including the scale at which the system is operating. This study aimed at investigating the influence of scale on a poultry slaughterhouse wastewater treatment process. The process is comprised of [...] Read more.
The efficiency of a wastewater treatment process may be affected by several factors including the scale at which the system is operating. This study aimed at investigating the influence of scale on a poultry slaughterhouse wastewater treatment process. The process is comprised of several units including electrolysis, membrane filtration, and ultraviolet irradiation. The results of the industrial-scale wastewater treatment plant of the Izevski poultry farm slaughterhouse in Kazakhstan were compared with those of a lab-scale wastewater treatment process under the same conditions. The traditional and water quality index (WQI) approaches were used to present the results and the drinking water quality standards of Kazakhstan were used as a reference. The industrial and lab-scale plants showed high purification efficiency for most of the studied water quality parameters. The comparative analysis based on the WQI showed that the industrial-scale wastewater treatment plant outperforms the lab-scale wastewater treatment process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

20 pages, 11929 KiB  
Review
Extended Producer Responsibility in the Australian Construction Industry
by Salman Shooshtarian, Tayyab Maqsood, Peter SP Wong, Malik Khalfan and Rebecca J. Yang
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 620; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020620 - 11 Jan 2021
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 6995
Abstract
With the COVID-19 outbreak across the world, policymakers and authorities have realised that they cannot solve the emerging issues using conventional policies and practices. COVID-19 has severely affected many industries, including construction and demolition (C&D) waste management and C&D waste resource recovery sector. [...] Read more.
With the COVID-19 outbreak across the world, policymakers and authorities have realised that they cannot solve the emerging issues using conventional policies and practices. COVID-19 has severely affected many industries, including construction and demolition (C&D) waste management and C&D waste resource recovery sector. Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) and schemes alike are policy instruments that prevent waste generation and promote a circular economy in the construction industry. These schemes are long adopted in various countries for different waste streams. EPR policy development and implementation, particularly for C&D waste, is still at an early stage in Australia. This study aims to review the Australian regulatory environment and practice to identify barriers and enablers towards successful policy development and implementation of C&D waste-related EPR. This study is based on secondary data that are publicly available. The document analysis was conducted to identify the level of regulatory and other stakeholders support in Australia. Following three rounds of examination of sources and applying multiple selection criteria, 59 different sources were reviewed in total. The results showed that there is widespread support among different stakeholders to develop EPR and expand the existing regulation to other materials. The barriers were cost and time implications for EPR policy establishment and enforcement, diversity of stakeholders involved, construction product lifecycle, responsibility of manufacturers, complexity in implantation of EPR regulations, modification inbuilt facilities and health and safety issues. Recommendations are made to alleviate these challenges. The outcome of this study could serve as a guideline for designing effective EPR policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Waste Strategies Development in the Framework of Circular Economy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop