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Towards World with Low-Carbon Development: The Conversion and Storage of Clean Energy and Sustainable Development

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (7 March 2024) | Viewed by 2065

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Shaanxi Province for Development and Application of New Transportation, Chang'an University, Xi'an 710064, China
Interests: energy and power engineering; combustion and emission of low-carbon fuel
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Energy and Electrical Engineering, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710064, China
Interests: alternative fuels for heavy-duty and maritime sectors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

At present, the world is facing serious environmental problems, such as climate change, air/water pollution, resource scarcity, etc., which are directly or indirectly affected by traditional energy sources. "Global access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and clean energy" is included in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations. Clean energy such as wind energy, solar energy, and hydropower is being widely developed and incorporated into the energy system to alleviate and overcome serious energy crises and environmental problems.

It is urgent to develop and build technologies and materials for energy storage and conversion to generate and utilize clean energy. This Special Issue aims to present new technologies and recent advances in clean energy conversion and storage. In addition, review papers that provide an important overview of the recent advances and research in the field of clean energy are welcome. Topics include, but are not limited to the following:

Energy storage theory and applications;

Energy conversion theory and applications;

Carbon neutrality;

Net zero emissions;

Energy saving and storage;

Converters for clean energy, such as solar, wind, hydro and marine power;

Synthetic liquid fuels from renewable energy sources;

Smart grids;

Battery technologies, processes and materials.

Dr. Zhanming Chen
Dr. Xiaochen Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy storage
  • energy conversion
  • energy saving
  • carbon neutral
  • low-carbon
  • net-zero emissions
  • clean energy
  • synthetic fuel
  • sustainable development

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 1033 KiB  
Article
Tourism Transport-Related CO2 Emissions and Economic Growth: A Deeper Perspective from Decomposing Driving Effects
by Yuxiang Yan and Chayanon Phucharoen
Sustainability 2024, 16(8), 3135; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16083135 - 9 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 761
Abstract
This study explores the intricate dynamics of CO2 emissions stemming from transport within the tourism sector. It aims to unravel the multidimensional aspects of how transport-related tourism contributes to CO2 emissions and to elucidate the complex relationship between regional economic growth [...] Read more.
This study explores the intricate dynamics of CO2 emissions stemming from transport within the tourism sector. It aims to unravel the multidimensional aspects of how transport-related tourism contributes to CO2 emissions and to elucidate the complex relationship between regional economic growth and CO2 emissions from transport-related tourism. Our study employed Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) and Panel Vector Autoregression (PVAR) models to analyze data from 30 Chinese provincial regions between 2010 and 2018. The tourism transport-related CO2 emissions were decomposed into four separate driving effects using the LMDI approach. Then, PVAR models were constructed to reveal dynamic interactions between each driving effect and per capita gross regional product (GRP). Our results demonstrate a decrease in both energy structure effect (tourism transport-related CO2 emissions from energy structure) and energy intensity effect (tourism transport-related CO2 emissions from energy intensity) during the pre-COVID decade. Notably, the positive impulse response of energy structure effect to per capita GRP is observed. However, we found no evidence of a cointegrated relationship between energy intensity effect and regional economic growth, although other factors demonstrated connections. These findings echo the necessity to integrate sustainable practices into the tourism transportation business, especially in the area of energy structure, in order to mitigate adverse environmental effects from tourism. This paper disseminates the main drivers of CO2 emissions in the tourism transport sector and their interrelationship with regional economic growth. It not only guides tourism policymakers in targeting efforts to reduce carbon footprints, but also sets a new benchmark for future studies on CO2 emissions. Full article
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14 pages, 1202 KiB  
Article
Research on the Influencing Factors and Decoupling State of Carbon Emissions in China’s Transportation Industry
by Xiao-Yang Li, Tao Chen and Bin Chen
Sustainability 2023, 15(15), 11871; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151511871 - 2 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 885
Abstract
To help achieve the dual-carbon target, based on the LMDI model and C-D production function, this study decomposed the influencing factors of CO2 emissions in China’s transportation industry from 2000 to 2020, then combined the Tapio model to explore the decoupling state. [...] Read more.
To help achieve the dual-carbon target, based on the LMDI model and C-D production function, this study decomposed the influencing factors of CO2 emissions in China’s transportation industry from 2000 to 2020, then combined the Tapio model to explore the decoupling state. The results showed that (1) from 2000 to 2020, CO2 emissions increased from 263.88 million tons to 957.59 million tons in China’s transportation industry. (2) The transportation intensity effect was the most significant factor to curb the growth in carbon emissions, and the total carbon emissions were reduced by about 364.84 million tons. The capital input effect was the primary factor promoting the carbon emissions, increasing the total carbon emissions by about 899.78 million tons. The effect of energy structure is the factor with the most potential to restrain the increase in carbon emissions in the future. (3) The decoupling state of the transportation industry mainly consists of expansive coupling and weak decoupling. Especially after 2010, the decoupling state remained a weak decoupling and continued to improve. The results can provide lessons for the establishment of policies in China’s transportation industry. Full article
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