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Sustainability in Social Marketing and Management

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic and Business Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2021) | Viewed by 10735

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Management and Economics, University of Beira Interior, 6201-001 Covilhã, Portugal
Interests: services marketing; higher education marketing; co-creation; intellectual capital social marketing; public sector marketing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Management and Economics, University of Beira Interior, 6201-001 Covilhã, Portugal
Interests: green marketing; consumer behavior; sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability has become a buzzword in recent decades, comprising social, environmental, and economic dimensions. Many companies claim to be committed to sustainability principles. However, evidence shows that the incorporation of sustainability principles into firms’ business strategies and operations has been slow, and there is much to be done. Evidence also shows that nonprofit organizations have performed better not only at incorporating sustainable principles in their activities, but also at contributing with social marketing campaigns that promote sustainability principle adoption by individuals, society, and businesses.

The aims of this Special Issue on “Sustainability in Social Marketing and Management” are to explore, discuss and analyze how sustainability principles have been adopted in businesses’ management practices or in nonprofit organizations, as well as how social marketing has been contributing and can contribute to the achievement of sustainable practices.

The guest editors welcome theoretical and empirical contributions that are focused on, but not limited to, the following topics:

- Social marketing campaigns for sustainability: sustainable consumption, green consumption, and social sustainable behaviors, among others;

- Differences and similarities in sustainable practices between businesses and nonprofit organizations;

- Social enterprises and the achievement of sustainable goals;

- Business approaches to sustainability;

- The incorporation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) in private companies and nonprofit organizations;

- Business models based in sustainability.

Prof. Helena Alves
Prof. José Luis Vázquez
Prof. Arminda do Paço
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • Social marketing
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Management practices

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 588 KiB  
Article
The Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior to Identify Determinants of Donation Intention: Towards the Comparative Examination of Positive and Negative Reputations of Nonprofit Organizations CEO
by Hyun Hye Kim and EunKyoung Han
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 9134; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219134 - 03 Nov 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 4087
Abstract
Using the extended theory of planned behavior, this study examined individuals’ cognitive and psychological determinants of their intentions to donate to nonprofit organizations (NPOs) with either a positive or negative chief executive officer (CEO) reputation. With the use of online survey data (n [...] Read more.
Using the extended theory of planned behavior, this study examined individuals’ cognitive and psychological determinants of their intentions to donate to nonprofit organizations (NPOs) with either a positive or negative chief executive officer (CEO) reputation. With the use of online survey data (n = 371), the similarities and differences in the relationships between the determinants were analyzed for the two NPO CEO reputations. To verify the hypotheses, multiple regression was used to analyze the data. The results reveal that for NPOs with positive CEO reputations, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, moral norms, past behavior, and identification had positive effects on the intention to donate. In contrast, for NPOs with negative CEO reputations, subjective norms and identification had positive effects on the intention to donate. Attitude toward the NPO was not related to donation intentions regardless of the CEO’s reputation. These findings suggest the need for strategies to increase the public’s intentions to donate to problematic NPOs with negative reputations. Additionally, a strategy to further strengthen the intention to donate in the case of a positive CEO reputation is proposed. Theoretical and managerial implications of the results are also discussed, highlighting important considerations for CEO reputations and NPO management in the short and long terms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Social Marketing and Management)
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19 pages, 607 KiB  
Article
Heuristic Thinking and Credibility of Organic Advertising Claims: The Role of Knowledge and Motivations
by Ana Lanero, José-Luis Vázquez and César Sahelices-Pinto
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8776; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218776 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3033
Abstract
Consumers are often overexposed to sustainability symbols and claims on food product packages and find it difficult to accurately judge their meaning when making purchase decisions. Based on the heuristic-systematic model (HSM), this paper aims to identify cognitive mechanisms to reduce the heuristic [...] Read more.
Consumers are often overexposed to sustainability symbols and claims on food product packages and find it difficult to accurately judge their meaning when making purchase decisions. Based on the heuristic-systematic model (HSM), this paper aims to identify cognitive mechanisms to reduce the heuristic credibility of organic advertising claims and to increase the motivation for searching for more reliable information when making product judgements. Particularly, we hypothesize that knowledge and defense and accuracy motivations affect organic claim credibility, which in turn is related to organic product judgement. Data collected from an experimental between-subject study with a sample of 412 Spanish undergraduates was analyzed using partial least squares. The results indicated that claim credibility was directly related to the attribution of organic properties to products, and was affected by defense motivation especially when appropriate knowledge was not available. Improving consumers’ knowledge reduced organic claim credibility and triggered a positive effect of accuracy motivation on credibility. The findings stress the importance of improving the regulation of ambitious advertising claims and developing specific educational campaigns to empower consumers and prevent biased purchase decisions of organic products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Social Marketing and Management)
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16 pages, 981 KiB  
Article
Driving Network Externalities in Education for Sustainable Development
by Bach Quang Ho and Yuki Inoue
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8539; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208539 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1994
Abstract
Solving important social problems and promoting sustainable development requires solutions involving multiple stakeholders. Nevertheless, previous social marketing studies were limited to individual behavioral changes and lacked a perspective to involve surrounding stakeholders. This study focused on education for sustainable development (ESD) on a [...] Read more.
Solving important social problems and promoting sustainable development requires solutions involving multiple stakeholders. Nevertheless, previous social marketing studies were limited to individual behavioral changes and lacked a perspective to involve surrounding stakeholders. This study focused on education for sustainable development (ESD) on a field trip and clarified the factors that promote students’ knowledge diffusion from the viewpoint of network externalities. A questionnaire was distributed, and responses from 1950 high school students were collected. This study used factor analysis to unveil the factors related to students’ features and field trip experiences and clarified how these factors promote driving network externalities and expanding the network through regression analysis. The findings indicated that the experiential value obtained from visiting a site with actual social problems has a large positive effect on driving network externalities and expanding the network. Therefore, encouraging driving network externalities and expanding networks by providing ESD on a field trip can contribute to solve social problems and achieve sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Social Marketing and Management)
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