sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Conversion of Residual Biomass Energy to Power Generation

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 3731

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Parthenope”, Centro Direzionale, Isola C4, 80143 Naples, Italy
Interests: thermodynamic and thermo-economic analysis of advanced energy systems; energy saving; renewable energy sources; dynamic modeling of energy conversion systems; innovative energy conversion systems; energy planning; thermo-fluid-dynamic measurements
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Cassino, Italy
Interests: porous media; computational fluid dynamic; fuel cells; waste-to-energy; validation; particle image velocimetry; energy conversion systems

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, University of Napoli “Parthenope”, 80143 Napoli, Italy
Interests: wastewater treatment; sludge treatment; gasification; porous materials; residual biomass; gothermal energy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

using biomass for energy production is becoming more and more attractive, especially in the electricity and transport sectors. Indeed, bioenergy represents a long-term measure to reduce the use of fossil fuels, decreasing at the same time greenhouse gas emissions and their contribution to climate change. This, together with the increasing cost of fossil fuels and the growing need for a secure energy source, has stressed the progress in biomass-based technologies, which are recognized as efficient, reliable, and environmentally friendly. In fact, unlike the other renewables, biomass can be stored and used to produce energy only when it is needed. Moreover, biomass is locally available, contributing to energy independence and regional social and economic development. Indeed, energy from biomass is the main source of renewable energy, with a share higher than 60%.

Nevertheless, the spread of bioenergy is still hindered by barriers such as social acceptance and technological limitations. Furthermore, the increase in the biomass demand for energy generation causes concern for several problems, such as land-use competition, deforestation, crops for food vs. biofuels, use of food, and water systems. These issues can be addressed by using residual biomass for energy generation. However, the high potential of such resources appears to be partly unexploited. For this reason, this Special Issue aims at collecting original research and review articles that include (but are not limited to):

  • energy efficient techniques and strategies for energy conversion of residual biomass;
  • innovative processes/technological novelties;
  • hybrid plants;
  • bioenergy potential;
  • techno-economic and socio-economic analyses;
  • possible future prospects, policies and challenges of residual biomass energy;
  • life-cycle assessment;
  • experimental and numerical studies.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.  

Prof. Dr. Laura Vanoli
Dr. Fausto Arpino
Dr. Simona Di Fraia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • residual biomass, bioenergy
  • biofuels
  • biorefinery
  • biomass energy potential
  • bioeconomy
  • energy conversion systems
  • hybrid systems
  • thermochemical treatments
  • biological processes
  • energy efficiency
  • optimization
  • energy management
  • experimental analysis
  • numerical analysis
  • computational fluid dynamics
  • techno-economic analysis
  • life cycle assessment (LCA)

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

18 pages, 3303 KiB  
Article
Unravelling the Role of Biochemical Compounds within the Hydrothermal Liquefaction Process of Real Sludge Mixtures
by Marco Balsamo, Francesca Di Lauro, Maria Laura Alfieri, Paola Manini, Piero Salatino, Fabio Montagnaro and Roberto Solimene
Sustainability 2024, 16(5), 1770; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16051770 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 588
Abstract
This paper aims to provide a contribution to understanding the role of sludge macro-components (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) on the yield/quality of bio-crude obtained via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). This was pursued by analysing the HTL process of real sludges and the mixtures thereof [...] Read more.
This paper aims to provide a contribution to understanding the role of sludge macro-components (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) on the yield/quality of bio-crude obtained via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). This was pursued by analysing the HTL process of real sludges and the mixtures thereof at different compositions, a topic that has been explored in a very limited way in the pertinent literature. The HTL experiments were run with municipal sludge, tannery sludge and a mixture of them in 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 weight ratios in a batch reactor at 350 °C and for different residence times. The outcomes for a single sludge showed a greater bio-crude yield for the municipal one (42.5% at 10 min), which is linked to its significant carbohydrate content. The results obtained from the sludge mixtures suggested that a carbohydrate-to-protein mass ratio of 2:1 would maximise the bio-crude yield (average value of about 38%). Moreover, LC-MS and NMR analyses highlighted that the mixed sludges contributed to the formation of a higher number of compounds after the HTL treatment, with respect to the pure municipal or tannery sludge, with an increase in amine, alcohols and aromatic compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conversion of Residual Biomass Energy to Power Generation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2351 KiB  
Article
Fuel Gas Production from the Co-Gasification of Coal, Plastic Waste, and Wood in a Fluidized Bed Reactor: Effect of Gasifying Agent and Bed Material
by Lucio Zaccariello and Maria Laura Mastellone
Sustainability 2023, 15(9), 7547; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15097547 - 4 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1492
Abstract
In this study, the effect of gasifying agent and bed material on the performance of the co-gasification of a mixture of coal, plastic waste, and wood was investigated. The experimental runs were carried out in a lab-scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor utilizing air, [...] Read more.
In this study, the effect of gasifying agent and bed material on the performance of the co-gasification of a mixture of coal, plastic waste, and wood was investigated. The experimental runs were carried out in a lab-scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor utilizing air, oxygen-enriched air, a mixture of air and steam, and a mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide as reactant gases, while silica sand, olivine, and a mixture of olivine and dolomite as bed materials were used. The results indicated that both gasifying agent and bed material strongly affect the gas composition and, as a consequence, the process performance. In particular, the test with oxygen-enriched air and silica sand provided a producer gas with the highest heating value (9.32 MJ/Nm3), while the best performance in terms of gas yield (2.98 Nm3/kg) and tar reduction (−94.5%) was obtained by utilizing the air/steam mixture and olivine. As regards tar composition, it was observed that the most abundant and recalcitrant tar substance groups are naphthalenes and PAHs. On the other hand, phenols and furans appear to be the most sensitive groups to the effect of gasifying agent and bed material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conversion of Residual Biomass Energy to Power Generation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

39 pages, 8329 KiB  
Review
Biomass Polygeneration Systems Integrated with Buildings: A Review
by Simona Di Fraia, Musannif Shah and Laura Vanoli
Sustainability 2024, 16(4), 1654; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16041654 - 17 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1029
Abstract
Biomass is widely acknowledged as a plentiful and easily accessible source of renewable energy. Unlike many other renewable sources, biomass offers a consistent and predictable power supply without significant concerns about energy and environmental impacts. When used as a fuel in polygeneration systems [...] Read more.
Biomass is widely acknowledged as a plentiful and easily accessible source of renewable energy. Unlike many other renewable sources, biomass offers a consistent and predictable power supply without significant concerns about energy and environmental impacts. When used as a fuel in polygeneration systems designed to produce multiple outputs such as electricity, heat, chemicals, and synthetic fuels, biomass greatly enhances overall system efficiency by minimizing energy losses. These systems gain further advantages when integrated in a decentralized manner with energy-intensive applications like buildings. This review article aims to shift the focus of readers from generic biomass-based systems to polygeneration systems tailored for specific applications, such as buildings. The overview will discuss various biomass resources, systematic approaches, technologies, successful case studies, potential benefits, and limitations of such systems integrated into real-life building applications. It also categorizes studies based on different conversion processes such as combustion, gasification, and anaerobic digestion, with combustion-based polygeneration systems being the most prevalent. The review also explores the use of standalone and hybrid biomass-based energy systems. Taking a multidisciplinary approach, the analysis considers energy, exergy, economic, and environmental perspectives. Parameters such as the primary energy savings (PES), exergy efficiency, simple payback (SPB) period, and CO2 emission reductions are commonly used in system analyses. The review underscores how polygeneration systems integrated into the building sector can enhance efficiency, resilience, and environmental sustainability. This synthesis aims to address current gaps, particularly in the domain of polygeneration systems connected with buildings, offering essential insights for researchers and specialists in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conversion of Residual Biomass Energy to Power Generation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop