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Waste to Wealth: Valorization of Organic Waste to Biofuels and Bioproducts

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2024 | Viewed by 770

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Microbiology and Environmental Biotechnology Research Group, Soil Science, Agricultural Research Council–Natural Resources and Engineering, Private Bag X79, Pretoria 0083, South Africa
Interests: renewable energy; biofuels; waste valorization; biotechnology and applied microbiology; agricultural biotechnology; microbial ecology

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Guest Editor
Microbiology and Environmental Biotechnology Research Group, Soil Science, Agricultural Research Council–Natural Resources and Engineering, Private Bag X79, Pretoria 0083, South Africa
Interests: renewable energy (biofuels) and nanotechnology

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Guest Editor
1. Soil Science, Agricultural Research Council-Natural Resources and Engineering, Private Bag X79, Pretoria 0083, South Africa
2. Department of Agriculture and Animal Health, University of South Africa, Private Bag X6, Florida 1710, South Africa
Interests: soil rehabilitation; vermicomposting; biochar; carbon sequestion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Waste is currently being generated at unprecedented levels, with projected increases of up to 40% in developing countries and 19% in developed countries by the year 2050. The impending global waste crisis is exacerbated by the inefficient collection and unsafe disposal of waste streams. Moreover, the rapid increase in urbanization and population growth is expected to contribute significantly to rising waste levels. This calls for radical waste management strategies that promote waste valorisation and progress towards a circular economy, where waste is considered a valuable resource. Waste-to-energy and other value-added commodities have gained much attention in recent years. Organic waste streams from agricultural, aquatic, forestry and terrestrial animal origins are particularly suitable for valorisation. Valorizing these waste streams can help manage waste and reduce greenhouse gas emissions that would otherwise be released and contribute to climate change if the waste was landfilled. 

This Special Issue aims to present and disseminate the most recent advances on organic waste valorization for biofuel production as well as other bio-based products.

Original research articles and reviews are welcome in this Special Issue. Research areas may include but are not limited to the following:

  • Biofuel production (biomethane, biohydrogen, bioethanol or biodiesel);
  • Biorefinery systems;
  • Waste valorization;
  • Succinic acid production;
  • Resource recovery from waste;
  • Gasification;
  • Fermentation;
  • Microbial fuel cells.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Ashira Roopnarain
Dr. Busiswa Ndaba
Dr. Adornis Nciizah
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • waste valorisation
  • organic waste
  • biofuel
  • biogas
  • bioethanol
  • biodiesel
  • bioproducts
  • circular economy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

18 pages, 279 KiB  
Review
Environmental Assessment of Pig Manure Treatment Systems through Life Cycle Assessment: A Mini-Review
by José Ferreira, Lenise Santos, Miguel Ferreira, António Ferreira and Idalina Domingos
Sustainability 2024, 16(9), 3521; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16093521 - 23 Apr 2024
Viewed by 477
Abstract
The primary aim of this research was to evaluate and compare the environmental impacts, throughout the life cycle, of the main treatment systems employed by the industry, as well as to identify the processes that contribute most to these environmental impacts. To achieve [...] Read more.
The primary aim of this research was to evaluate and compare the environmental impacts, throughout the life cycle, of the main treatment systems employed by the industry, as well as to identify the processes that contribute most to these environmental impacts. To achieve this, a bibliographical search was conducted using the Web of Science Core Collection database platform, utilizing the keywords “life cycle assessment”, “pig”, “treatment”, and “manure” or “slurry”. The search was restricted to publications from the last five years (2019–2023), resulting in a total of 66 publications that were then analyzed according to the functional unit (FU) adopted. For the 10 publications whose FUs were expressed in tons or cubic meters of treated manure, a descriptive and quantitative analysis was carried out. It was found that anaerobic digestion has been the most widely used treatment technology for pig manure over the past five years, according to the LCA methodology. These systems, configured as biogas and biofertilizer production facilities, have proven to be environmentally friendly and could play a crucial role in the energy transition and decarbonization of the energy matrix. Full article
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