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Geoheritage and Sustainable Development of Geotourism

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2024 | Viewed by 1862

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Geography, Tourism and Hotel Management, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, 21 000 Novi Sad, Serbia
Interests: geotourism; sustainable geotourism; geoconservation; geoethics; visitor motivation; geosite interpretation; geosite education; geosite management
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geoheritage refers to geological features, sites, and landscapes of significant scientific, educational, aesthetic, or cultural value. It represents the Earth's natural heritage and provides a window into the planet's geological history. The concept of sustainable development in the context of geotourism involves the responsible and balanced use of geoheritage resources to foster economic growth, while conserving and preserving the natural environment for future generations.

Geotourism, as a form of sustainable tourism, focuses on promoting and experiencing the geological wonders of a region. It involves activities such as visiting geological sites, participating in educational programs, and engaging in outdoor recreational pursuits. By combining the principles of sustainable development with geotourism, it becomes possible to create a harmonious relationship between tourism, conservation, and local communities.

The sustainable development of geotourism involves various key aspects. Firstly, it requires the identification, protection, and management of geoheritage sites to prevent their degradation or destruction. This includes establishing protected areas, implementing conservation strategies, and monitoring visitor impacts. Secondly, it emphasizes the promotion of environmentally friendly practices in tourism operations, such as minimizing waste generation, conserving energy and water resources, and supporting local sustainable initiatives.

Additionally, geotourism should contribute to the socioeconomic development of local communities. This can be achieved by involving residents in tourism planning and decision making processes, providing them with opportunities for employment and entrepreneurship, and supporting the preservation of local traditions and cultural heritage.

By integrating sustainable development principles into geotourism, we can ensure the long-term viability and resilience of geoheritage sites, while simultaneously fostering economic growth, community empowerment, and environmental conservation. It offers a unique way to appreciate and protect the Earth's geological wonders, promoting a deeper understanding of our planet's history and inspiring a sense of stewardship towards its natural resources.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: geoheritage and sustainable geotourism development and management as well as all aspects of geosite interpretation and education, the economic impacts of geotourism, geoethics, geoconservation, geotourism policies and planning, visitor motivation, and local community stakeholder engagement in geotourism activities.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Nemanja Tomić
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • geotourism
  • sustainable geotourism
  • geoconservation
  • geoethics
  • visitor motivation
  • geosite interpretation
  • geosite education
  • geosite management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 30402 KiB  
Article
Preliminary Investigation of the Remnants of Low-Latitude Glacial Activity on the Southeastern Margin of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau
by Yiwen Pan, Shitao Zhang, Jianping Chen, Cheng Zhang and Shuangshuang Wu
Sustainability 2024, 16(8), 3492; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16083492 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 112
Abstract
The formation of Quaternary glaciers represented a pivotal event in the climatic and geological history of the Tibetan Plateau. However, due to the scarcity of direct evidence for low-latitude glaciation, the timing and extent of late Quaternary glaciation on the Tibetan Plateau remain [...] Read more.
The formation of Quaternary glaciers represented a pivotal event in the climatic and geological history of the Tibetan Plateau. However, due to the scarcity of direct evidence for low-latitude glaciation, the timing and extent of late Quaternary glaciation on the Tibetan Plateau remain controversial. This study focuses on the Liangwang Mountains, which are located in the southeastern part of the Tibetan Plateau and has a maximum elevation of 2820 m, as the subject of investigation. Through a comprehensive application of glacial landform analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-based micromorphology analysis of quartz sand, and spore-pollen data analysis, we uncovered evident signs of glacial activity in this region during the Quaternary period. Our research identified typical glacial landforms such as cirques, U-shaped valleys, fluted moraines, and terminal moraines. Additionally, spore-pollen analysis revealed a high frequency of fir pollen, indicating cold climatic conditions during that time. Furthermore, the micromorphology analysis of quartz sand further corroborated the glacial origin of these deposits. Based on these combined findings, our study confirms that the Liangwang Mountains experienced glaciation during the Quaternary period, making them glacial relics at the lowest latitude currently known in mainland China. This discovery provides a valuable reference for understanding the paleoclimate and glacial history of the Tibetan Plateau and its surrounding regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geoheritage and Sustainable Development of Geotourism)
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28 pages, 18524 KiB  
Article
New Geoeducational Facilities in Central Mazovia (Poland) Disseminate Knowledge about Local Geoheritage
by Maria Górska-Zabielska
Sustainability 2023, 15(22), 16115; https://doi.org/10.3390/su152216115 - 20 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 602
Abstract
Geoeducation is fundamental for safeguarding the abiotic world and its impact on the environment, which is inhabited by a society with ever-growing aspirations. However, current Earth and environmental science education in schools is insufficient. It requires creative and captivating methods that extend beyond [...] Read more.
Geoeducation is fundamental for safeguarding the abiotic world and its impact on the environment, which is inhabited by a society with ever-growing aspirations. However, current Earth and environmental science education in schools is insufficient. It requires creative and captivating methods that extend beyond traditional classroom settings, such as utilising new natural landscapes, in order to effectively implement geoeducation. New geological resources are unveiled during fieldwork or deep excavations. They can also be altered in situ through anthropogenic means to appear more visible to observers, particularly in remote tourism regions. As a geotourism product, these resources have the potential to serve as a catalyst for local economic growth. This article presents five geosites in central Mazovia, Poland, which were opened to the public in 2022 and 2023. Two Scandinavian erratic boulders, one of which has been developed, and three lapidaries with geotourism infrastructure are discussed. The research examines the significance of the erratic boulders for the natural and human environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geoheritage and Sustainable Development of Geotourism)
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17 pages, 1809 KiB  
Article
Travel Behaviour Insights among Geotourists in Serbia—Case Study of Zaječar District
by Miloš Marjanović, Nemanja Tomić, Aleksandar Antić and Tijana Tomić
Sustainability 2023, 15(22), 15969; https://doi.org/10.3390/su152215969 - 15 Nov 2023
Viewed by 697
Abstract
Geotourism is a rapidly growing market for tourism, and has gained huge popularity worldwide. Zaječar district is located in Eastern Serbia, and this area is famous for many attractive geotourism features that seek to be presented to the global tourism market. This article [...] Read more.
Geotourism is a rapidly growing market for tourism, and has gained huge popularity worldwide. Zaječar district is located in Eastern Serbia, and this area is famous for many attractive geotourism features that seek to be presented to the global tourism market. This article aims to present geotourist typology models based on their motivation and travel behaviour. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 194 respondents who visited the geosites of Zaječar district or have the intention to visit them. The data was processed by an exploratory factor analysis, one-way ANOVA, the t-test for independent samples, and multiple regression analyses for in-depth investigations and statistical validation of the findings. The results present three typology models of geotourists based on their motivation to visit geosites (health and relaxation, education and curiosity, socialisation), and three typology models of geotourists based on their travel behaviour (active behaviour, passive behaviour, individual behaviour). The analysis also revealed that motives significantly predict tourist behaviour. Also, this study shows that respondents (tourists) have a positive attitude towards local communities, and emphasise their importance for geotourism development. These findings could be helpful for policy managers and all other interested parties to create strategies and tourism products according to the needs of the potential geotourism market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geoheritage and Sustainable Development of Geotourism)
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