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Sustainability in Metal Additive Manufacturing

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 3186

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Suzhou Industrial Park Monash Research Institute of Science and Technology, Monash University, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215000, China
Interests: qualification for additive manufacturing; process monitoring in laser powder bed fusion; titanium alloys; surface roughness; design for additive manufacturing

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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg 41296, Sweden
Interests: powder reuse; upcycling and recycling in metal additive manufacturing; sustainability aspects of additive manufacturing; powder qualification and degradation; powder metallurgy and rheological behavior of particles

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies have emerged as manufacturing processes for producing functional components in various industrial sectors like aerospace, biomedical, automotive, and energy generation. AM technologies show great potential in boosting sustainability in the industry as it brings the benefits of design freedom, mass customization, the possibility of print-on-demand, and a low buy-to-fly ratio. Metal AM technologies have seen significant technical advancements and maturation recently in terms of quality assurance, design optimization, and development of material portfolio thanks to the joint efforts made by researchers in the fields of materials science, mechanical engineering, and computer science, etc. Meanwhile, there still exist practical hurdles for industries to implement metal AM technologies, such as the high production cost, uncertainties in part quality, the need for expensive and time-consuming post-processing, and lack of standard procedures for reusing/recycling raw materials. The Special Issue invites contributions from all relevant disciplines to address the sustainability issues in AM, topics of interests include and are not limited to:

  • Degradation and reusability of feedstock materials (powder, wire, etc.) for metal AM processes through production cycles;
  • Recycling, upscaling and cost-effective production of metal AM feedstock materials;
  • Smart design or redesign of components to better utilize the potential of AM technologies;
  • Process optimization to reduce material waste and production cost of metal AM;
  • Optimisation of post-processing parameters for metal AM products;
  • Qualification of metal AM materials, products, and machines;
  • Quality assurance of AM products using online monitoring techniques;
  • Life cycle assessment (LCA) of metal AM components;
  • Sustainability indicators of metal AM processes;
  • Development of cost models for metal AM processes.

Dr. Zhuoer Chen
Dr. Laura Cordova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • powders for additive manufacturing
  • powder recycling and reuse
  • powder degradation
  • process development
  • sustainability
  • life cycle assessment
  • design for additive manufacturing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 9629 KiB  
Article
Effective Ti-6Al-4V Powder Recycling in LPBF Additive Manufacturing Considering Powder History
by Tejas Koushik, Haopeng Shen, Wen Hao Kan, Mu Gao, Junlan Yi, Chao Ma, Samuel Chao Voon Lim, Louis Ngai Sum Chiu and Aijun Huang
Sustainability 2023, 15(21), 15582; https://doi.org/10.3390/su152115582 - 02 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1377
Abstract
Laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) is an outstanding additive manufacturing (AM) technology that can enable both complicated geometries and desired mechanical properties in high-value components. However, the process reliability and cost have been the obstacles to the extensive industrial adoptions of LPBF. This [...] Read more.
Laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) is an outstanding additive manufacturing (AM) technology that can enable both complicated geometries and desired mechanical properties in high-value components. However, the process reliability and cost have been the obstacles to the extensive industrial adoptions of LPBF. This work aims to develop a powder recycling procedure to reduce production cost and minimize process uncertainties due to powder degradation. We used a recycle index (R) to reuse Ti-6Al-4V powder through 10 production cycles. Using this recycle index is more reasonable than simply replying on recycle numbers as it incorporates the powder usage history. A recycling procedure with simple virgin powder top-up can effectively mitigate powder degradation and maintain stable powder properties, chemical compositions, and tensile properties. The experimental finding points to a sustainable recycling strategy of Ti alloy powders with minimal material waste and without noticeable detriment to observed mechanical performance through LPBF production cycles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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14 pages, 4262 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Structural Design on the Dimensional Accuracy of CuCrZr Alloy Produced by Laser Powder Bed Fusion
by Zhibo Ma, Shiheng Zhang, Chaofeng Gao, Xu Gu, Xiaojing Xiong, Yunjie Bi and Jeremy Heng Rao
Sustainability 2022, 14(21), 14639; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142114639 - 07 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1295
Abstract
With the upgrade of additive manufacturing (AM) equipment, pure copper and various Cu-based alloys with almost full density have been successfully produced, maintaining their excellent thermal and electrical conductivity and good mechanical properties at high temperatures as well. In this paper, a model [...] Read more.
With the upgrade of additive manufacturing (AM) equipment, pure copper and various Cu-based alloys with almost full density have been successfully produced, maintaining their excellent thermal and electrical conductivity and good mechanical properties at high temperatures as well. In this paper, a model with a series of inclined surface structures was designed and fabricated to investigate the structural design on the formability of CuCrZr alloy produced by laser powder bed fusion (LPBF). The typical structure dimensions of the as-built samples were measured and compared with their corresponding dimensions and the inclined angle (α) and the relative angle (γ) between the inclined surface and recoating directions. The results demonstrate that the inclined structures with α < 50° were fabricated either with varying buckling deformation and powder adhesion or in failure for severe distortion. The differences (Ld) between the typical structure dimensions and their models increase with the decreasing of α. It has been observed that Ld reaches 1 mm when α is 20° and drastically reduces to around 200 μm when α is above 50°. When α < 50°, Ld is generally increasing with a rising γ value from 0° to 180°, significantly affecting the dimensional accuracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Metal Additive Manufacturing)
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