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Waste-Derived Functional Materials: Application in Water and Wastewater Treatment

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2024 | Viewed by 1506

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Water Quality Science and Water Environment Recovery Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, China
Interests: resource utilization of iron and manganese sludge; water purification of iron; manganese; ammonia nitrogen and arsenic containing water source
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water pollution is a major threat to the sustainable development of human society; therefore, there is an urgent need to develop efficient and low-cost water and wastewater treatment technologies to ensure the supply of clean drinking water and the restoration of polluted water bodies. However, most water treatment technologies heavily rely on functional materials, making low-cost and high-performance water treatment materials highly favored. Currently, a large number of researchers have focused on the preparation and application research of waste-derived water treatment materials, which have significant environmental and economic significance.

This Special Issue will concentrate on highlighting timely research including the latest applications of waste-derived functional materials in adsorption, photocatalytic degradation, electrochemical treatment, and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs).  For this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Resource utilization of agricultural waste and its application in water and wastewater treatment.
  • Resource utilization of industrial waste and its application in water and wastewater treatment.
  • Resource utilization of water treatment residuals and its application in water and wastewater treatment.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Huiping Zeng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability
  • waste-derived functional materials
  • water and wastewater treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 4253 KiB  
Article
Facile Preparation of Magnetic Chitosan Carbon Based on Recycling of Iron Sludge for Sb(III) Removal
by Huiping Zeng, He Xu, Yuwei Zeng, Siqi Sun, Jie Zhang and Dong Li
Sustainability 2024, 16(7), 2788; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16072788 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 447
Abstract
In this study, following the concept of “treating waste with waste”, magnetic chitosan carbon (MCC) was developed through the pyrolysis of chitosan/iron sludge (CHS) beads created using an embedding method in a closed environment for antimony removal. The results indicate MCC has a [...] Read more.
In this study, following the concept of “treating waste with waste”, magnetic chitosan carbon (MCC) was developed through the pyrolysis of chitosan/iron sludge (CHS) beads created using an embedding method in a closed environment for antimony removal. The results indicate MCC has a good magnetic recovery rate and that its magnetic saturation strength can reach 33.243 emu/g. The iron proportion and acid resistance of MCC were all better than those of CHS, and at 25 °C, its adsorption saturation capacity improved from 24.956 mg/g to 38.234 mg/g. MCC has a quick adsorption equilibrium time, and in about 20 min, 90% of the final equilibrium capacity can be achieved. The primary mechanism of Sb adsorption by MCC is the formation of an inner sphere complex between Fe-O and Sb, while surface complexation, hydrogen bonding, and interaction also play a function. Thus, MCC, a lower-cost and greener adsorbent for Sb removal, has been made using iron sludge. This enabled it to utilize iron sludge as a resource and served as a reference for the sustainable management of water treatment residuals. Full article
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22 pages, 7056 KiB  
Article
Activated Carbon Fabricated from Biomass for Adsorption/Bio-Adsorption of 2,4-D and MCPA: Kinetics, Isotherms, and Artificial Neural Network Modeling
by Raid Alrowais, Mahmoud M. Abdel daiem, Basheer M. Nasef and Noha Said
Sustainability 2024, 16(1), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16010299 - 28 Dec 2023
Viewed by 811
Abstract
Adsorption is an effective and economical alternative to remove herbicides from polluted water. The aim of this study is to investigate the adsorption of the most common herbicides (2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA)) onto activated carbon (AC) fabricated from wheat straw [...] Read more.
Adsorption is an effective and economical alternative to remove herbicides from polluted water. The aim of this study is to investigate the adsorption of the most common herbicides (2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA)) onto activated carbon (AC) fabricated from wheat straw under different conditions. The adsorption of MCPA and 2,4-D onto the selected AC (CLW) and the effects of the ionic strength, the solution pH, and the presence of microorganisms in the medium were investigated. The results showed that the selected AC had a high surface area (1437 m2/g). The adsorption rate increased with an increase in the AC mass. The selected AC had a higher adsorption capacity (1.32 mmol/g) for 2,4-D compared to MCPA (0.76 mmol/g). The adsorption of 2,4-D and MCPA was not affected by variation in the solution pH. However, the presence of electrolytes exerted a major effect on adsorption. The presence of microorganisms enhanced adsorption onto the AC by 17% and 32% for 2,4-D and MCPA, respectively. Moreover, a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) was employed to accurately predict the adsorption capacity based on the pollutant type, carbon dose, initial concentration, pH, ionic strength, and presence of bacteria. The RBFNN showed excellent accuracy in predicting the adsorption capacity, with an R2 value of 0.96 and a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.054. These findings showed that the AC fabricated from biomass residues of wheat straw is a promising option to recycle this type of biomass waste and reduce environmental threats, consequently contributing to achieving sustainability. Full article
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