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Renewable Energy Driven Sorption Cooling and Desalination

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 17 September 2024 | Viewed by 1733

Special Issue Editor

School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
Interests: waste energy; renewable energy; energy storage; thermal heat-driven cooling; heating; desalination; power generation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The widespread and extensive reliance on non-renewable petrochemical energy sources has led to a cascade of multifaceted issues, prominently featuring environmental degradation and the amplification of the greenhouse effect. Consequently, a compelling need arises for the substantial and sustained development of renewable energy solutions. Within this imperative, the judicious and efficient utilization of renewable energy becomes paramount, encompassing a comprehensive utilization and an enduring commitment to sustainability in various applications, such as refrigeration, desalination, and beyond.

Sorption technology emerges as a beacon among the most promising methods for harnessing sustainable and renewable energy. In recent years, there has been a marked and notable surge in research dedicated to advancing sorption systems, with a discernible focus on sustainability through the exploration of new materials, the refinement of advanced thermodynamic cycles, the augmentation of heat and mass transfer efficiency, the optimization of control strategies, the development of innovative prototypes, and the documentation of practical application cases. Consequently, creating an academic platform becomes a necessity and imperative for the expeditious and sustained showcasing of the latest developments in the domains of sorption cooling and desalination with a keen eye on sustainability.

The primary limitations inherent in sorption systems manifest in their inherently low energy efficiency and the substantial volumes of the systems. Hence, this Special Issue is meticulously crafted to address these sustainability challenges with a laser focus on critical issues, encompassing the inadequate adsorption capacity of adsorbents, suboptimal heat and mass transfer performance, and the overall sustainability of the system. Recent advancements in the field encapsulate the exploration of advanced adsorbents, cutting-edge heat exchangers, the integration of combined sorption cycles, the pursuit of advanced theoretical research, and the expansive exploration of broader applications, all intricately interwoven with a commitment to sustainability.

Within this thematic framework, topics of particular interest span the evolution of these sustainable energy systems' performance, adaptability, and reliability, along with their seamless and sustainable integration for optimized efficacy. Additionally, a warm and wholehearted reception is extended for pioneering and sustainable applications, such as water harvesting, profound dehumidification processes, carbon capture, and innovative forms of utilization. In the context of this Special Issue, a fervent invitation is extended for the submission of original research articles and reviews, spanning an expansive spectrum of research areas that may include, but are by no means limited to the following:

  1. Pioneering Adsorbents and Sorbents: Exploring novel adsorption methodologies, innovative theoretical frameworks, and experimental research paradigms rooted in sustainability.
  2. Emerging Cycles: In-depth investigations into sustainable and efficient cycles, comprising theoretical and experimental research on composite cycles.
  3. Trailblazing Applications: A wide-ranging exploration of sustainable applications, encompassing refrigeration, air conditioning, energy storage, heating, desalination, and beyond, with a steadfast commitment to sustainability and enduring viability.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Zisheng Lu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • renewable energy
  • sorption
  • cooling
  • desalination

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 857 KiB  
Article
Energy Transition and Poverty Alleviation in Light of Environmental and Economic Challenges: A Comparative Study in China and the European Union Region
by Faten Derouez, Adel Ifa and Abdullah Al Shammre
Sustainability 2024, 16(11), 4468; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16114468 - 24 May 2024
Viewed by 191
Abstract
This study aims to compare the effectiveness of renewable energy and circular economy practices in reducing environmental damage and poverty in China and the European Union (EU) by using the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) approach and the Vector Error Correction Model (VECM) technique. [...] Read more.
This study aims to compare the effectiveness of renewable energy and circular economy practices in reducing environmental damage and poverty in China and the European Union (EU) by using the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) approach and the Vector Error Correction Model (VECM) technique. Analyzing data from 1995 to 2022, we compared the effectiveness of these approaches in both regions. This study offers several fresh perspectives on the fight against environmental damage and poverty, differentiating itself from existing research in a few key ways. In fact, most studies focus on a single region’s approach to sustainability. However, this research directly compares China and the European Union (EU), highlighting how factors like economic structure and development stages influence the effectiveness of renewable energy and circular economy practices. Also, this study shows how renewable energy and circular practices can simultaneously tackle both environmental damage (emissions) and social issues (poverty). Our findings reveal that factors like poverty, fossil fuel reliance, economic growth, and international trade all contribute to rising carbon emissions in both China and the EU, though their influence varies. Interestingly, China experienced greater success in curbing emissions through solar power, circular economy measures, and wind power compared to the EU. Additionally, the impact of these strategies on poverty reduction differed significantly between the two regions. Based on these results, we recommend that policy makers in both regions develop tailored strategies for tackling carbon emissions and poverty. Prioritizing renewable energy sources and circular practices is key, as they can simultaneously reduce emissions and alleviate poverty. However, it is crucial to focus on approaches that work best in each specific region, considering social, economic, and environmental factors. This study suggests that a one-size-fits-all approach will not work for fighting climate change and poverty. While renewable energy and circular economies are effective, China saw greater success with solar and wind power compared to the EU. Policy makers need to design strategies specific to their region’s economic, social, and environmental context. Further research can refine these approaches, and public education is crucial to promote sustainable behavior and empower policy makers. It is also needed to refine and improve the implementation of these strategies. Finally, public awareness and education are essential to promote sustainable behavior and empower policy makers in their fight against climate change and poverty. This study highlights the importance of a region-specific approach to energy transition and poverty alleviation. By comparing China and the EU, we gain valuable insights into the effectiveness of different strategies in tackling these interconnected challenges. The findings provide valuable guidance for policy makers looking to create a more sustainable and equitable future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy Driven Sorption Cooling and Desalination)
19 pages, 3229 KiB  
Article
Performance Evaluation and Cycle Time Optimization of Vapor-Compression/Adsorption Cascade Refrigeration Systems
by Mahmoud Badawy Elsheniti, Hany Al-Ansary, Jamel Orfi and Abdelrahman El-Leathy
Sustainability 2024, 16(9), 3669; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16093669 - 27 Apr 2024
Viewed by 455
Abstract
The reliance on more sustainable refrigeration systems with less electricity consumption attracts a lot of attention as the demand for refrigeration increases due to population growth and global warming threats. This study examines the use of a cascade vapor-compression/adsorption refrigeration system in hot [...] Read more.
The reliance on more sustainable refrigeration systems with less electricity consumption attracts a lot of attention as the demand for refrigeration increases due to population growth and global warming threats. This study examines the use of a cascade vapor-compression/adsorption refrigeration system in hot weather, focusing on condensing temperatures of 50, 55, and 60 °C, whereas an air-cooled condenser is in use due to practical considerations. A fully coupled transient model is developed using COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate the integrated system, considering the practical limitations of the vapor compression system (VCS) and the dynamic nature of the adsorption system (ADS). The model combines a lumped model for the ADS with the manufacturer’s data for a VCS compressor at different condensing and evaporating temperatures. It was found that the VCS is more sensitive to the change in the ADS’s condensing temperature, since when the temperature is raised from 50 °C to 60 °C, the VCS’s COP decreases by 29.5%, while the ADS’s COP decreases by 7.55%. Furthermore, the cycle time of ADS plays an important role in providing the cooling requirements for the bottoming cycle (VCS), and it can be optimized to maximize the energy conversion efficiency of the VCS. At optimum cycle time and compared to the conventional VCS, the cascade system can boost the cooling capacity of the VCS by 18.2%, lower the compressor power by 63.2%, and greatly enhance the COP by 221%. These results indicate that the application of the cascade VCS/ADS in such severe conditions is a more sustainable and energy-efficient solution to meet the growing need for refrigeration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy Driven Sorption Cooling and Desalination)
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25 pages, 1912 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Food Security: Balancing Desalination, Climate Change, and Population Growth in Five Arab Countries Using ARDL and VECM
by Faten Derouez and Adel Ifa
Sustainability 2024, 16(6), 2302; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16062302 - 11 Mar 2024
Viewed by 844
Abstract
This study examines the complex interplay between food security, climate change, population, water, and renewable energy desalination in five Arab countries: Morocco, Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Using a comprehensive econometric approach: an Auto-Regressive Distributed Lag approach (ARDL) and [...] Read more.
This study examines the complex interplay between food security, climate change, population, water, and renewable energy desalination in five Arab countries: Morocco, Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Using a comprehensive econometric approach: an Auto-Regressive Distributed Lag approach (ARDL) and Vector Error Correction Model (VECM) technique spanning 1990–2022, to explore the short- and long-run dynamics of these relationships and identify causal linkages. The ARDL results reveal a mixed outcome. While renewable energy desalination capacity holds potential for enhancing food security in all countries, its impact depends on cost and government support. The cost of desalination negatively affects food security in most cases, highlighting the need for cost-effective solutions. Climate change poses a significant threat, particularly in Morocco, Egypt, and Jordan, but it may also offer unexpected opportunities for KSA and UAE. Population growth, unsurprisingly, strains food security across the region. Water scarcity emerges as a major challenge, especially for Jordan. The Granger causality tests uncover bidirectional relationships between renewable energy desalination, climate change, and water in Morocco and Jordan, suggesting their interconnected influence. In Egypt, population, water, and food imports drive the system, while KSA and UAE exhibit complex dynamics with renewable energy desalination and food imports acting as key drivers. Policymakers facing the complex challenge of food security in Arab countries should take note of this research’s multifaceted findings. While renewable energy desalination holds promise, its success hinges on reducing costs through technological advancements and government support, particularly in Morocco, Egypt, and Jordan. Climate change adaptation strategies must be prioritized, while recognizing potentially unexpected opportunities in regions like KSA and UAE. Additionally, addressing water scarcity through innovative resource management is crucial, especially for Jordan. Managing population growth through family planning initiatives and promoting sustainable agricultural practices are vital for long-term food security. Finally, the identified causal relationships underscore the need for integrated policy approaches that acknowledge the interconnectedness of these factors. By tailoring responses to the specific dynamics of each nation, policymakers can ensure effective interventions and secure a sustainable food future for the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy Driven Sorption Cooling and Desalination)
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