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Food Innovation for Planetary Health

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Food".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2021) | Viewed by 14556

Special Issue Editors

Curtin University Sustainability Policy (CUSP) Institute, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
Interests: innovation; sustainability; governance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Centre for Advanced Food Enginomics, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
Interests: food sustainability and consumer behaviour change; social marketing; new meat alternatives

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a lot of change happening and further transformations are needed in the systems we use to produce and distribute food. The food we eat has a significant impact on human and population health and the state of the ecological systems of the planet. In 2019, the EAT-Lancet Commission pointed out that poor diets are posing a greater risk to morbidity and mortality than unsafe sex, alcohol, drug, and tobacco use combined. Concerns related to sustainability, environmental impacts, public and human health as well as the use of available on land, water, energy, and other global public resources are examples of why we need to look at innovations that can help transition to better and more just ways of feeding the global population. We need to reduce the harm caused and promote better ways of producing, distributing, and consuming food. This transformation has to spread from the level of ingredients to the entire food system that needs to reflect the reality and priorities of the 21st century.

This Special Issue calls for submissions related to innovations in the area of food production, distribution, and marketing, concerning the following: the current ecological footprint of food, maintaining soil fertility, preventing further deterioration of planetary health, assisting in improving human health, utilizing the latest scientific and technological advances, making food-related systems more sustainable and just, reducing animal exploitation, and preventing the emergence of new zoonotic diseases. Interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches are particularly encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Dora Marinova
Dr. Diana Bogueva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food innovation
  • sustainable food
  • plant-based foods
  • cultured meat
  • new meat alternatives, soil fertility
  • regenerative agriculture
  • social marketing
  • flexitarianism
  • resource efficiency
  • land use
  • sustainable agriculture
  • low-carbon technologies
  • planetary health
  • planetary diet
  • antibiotics
  • zoonotic diseases

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 291 KiB  
Article
Climate Change Knowledge and Awareness of Nutrition Professionals: A Case Study from Turkey
Sustainability 2022, 14(7), 3774; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14073774 - 23 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1622
Abstract
Nutrition professionals (nutritionists and dietitians) assess nutritional and food-related health problems. They also identify appropriate interventions and support people in making dietary and lifestyle changes. The current climate change emergency constitutes a global threat to health, and the nutrition professionals can promote some [...] Read more.
Nutrition professionals (nutritionists and dietitians) assess nutritional and food-related health problems. They also identify appropriate interventions and support people in making dietary and lifestyle changes. The current climate change emergency constitutes a global threat to health, and the nutrition professionals can promote some diet-related alterations that encourage practical mitigation actions against it. This study assessed the knowledge and awareness levels of Turkish nutrition professionals about climate change by using a multiple-choice online quantitative survey conducted in 2021. It uses a sample of 1200 nutrition professionals who graduated from Turkish Universities. The findings showed that the participants’ climate change knowledge and awareness levels were correlated and significantly affected each other when it comes to understanding, responding, effects and awareness (p < 0.05). However, the links with knowledge about sustainable diet and scientific collaboration were statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). Educational and practice-based opportunities for linking climate change and diet-related advice are suggested for Turkish nutrition professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Innovation for Planetary Health)
24 pages, 325 KiB  
Article
Meat Me Halfway: Sydney Meat-Loving Men’s Restaurant Experience with Alternative Plant-Based Proteins
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1290; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031290 - 24 Jan 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 6201
Abstract
Within the theoretical framework of psychological reactance and impression management, this study conducted in Sydney, Australia, in 2020–2021, explores the acceptance by men of alternatives to animal-based foods. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 36 men who have visited a vegan restaurant and [...] Read more.
Within the theoretical framework of psychological reactance and impression management, this study conducted in Sydney, Australia, in 2020–2021, explores the acceptance by men of alternatives to animal-based foods. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 36 men who have visited a vegan restaurant and have eaten a plant-based burger. The findings from the study show that, despite the increasing popularity of these novel food options, men are unlikely to include the plant-based alternatives as a permanent feature of their diets as explained by the theory of psychological reactance. However, the study’s male participants acknowledged the importance of women for their visit to the vegan restaurant which can be explained by impression management theory. Using excerpts from the interviews, men’s experience is highlighted, particularly as it relates to concerns linked to masculinity, dietary identity and social perception by others. The analysis reveals the complexity of transitioning to more sustainable food choices within a gender-constructed social environment. Whether the new plant-based alternatives to meat are going to be a short-lived trend or a more lasting option in the men’s diets is also discussed. Practical implications for social marketing as a tool to influence collective behaviour are drawn. They emphasise the role of women, changing social perceptions and transparency about the new plant-based products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Innovation for Planetary Health)
12 pages, 419 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Plant-Based Nutrition Diets on Plasma Lipids Profile—A Study Case in Romania
Sustainability 2022, 14(2), 1008; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14021008 - 17 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2316
Abstract
Diet is an important tool in managing dyslipidemic disorders, thus contributing to the prophylaxis of cardiovascular morbidity. Research has shown that a plant-based diet could have positive effects through many pathways. We conducted a study on a group of 38 plant-based individuals from [...] Read more.
Diet is an important tool in managing dyslipidemic disorders, thus contributing to the prophylaxis of cardiovascular morbidity. Research has shown that a plant-based diet could have positive effects through many pathways. We conducted a study on a group of 38 plant-based individuals from Romania who have adopted the diet for at least one year. The aim of the research was to evaluate eventual changes in their lipid profile. We analyzed to what extent the values of different markers significantly changed following the dietary transition. Improvements were obtained for body mass index (BMI) and all lipid markers, with the exception of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Results showed that 75.0% of persons with elevated TGs (triglycerides) succeeded in normalizing them, as well as individuals with high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, where 72.7% from the borderline elevated became optimal. The total cholesterol (TC)/HDL-C ratio shifted from elevated to optimum in 78.6% of cases. Results were poor in three participants with presumed familial hypercholesterolemia, which were later successfully managed by using lipid-lowering medication. In conclusion, although dyslipidemias are only a surrogate marker for cardiovascular morbidity, the actions by which a plant-based diet can influence cardiovascular diseases are multiple, and we consider that our study confirms its positive effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Innovation for Planetary Health)
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17 pages, 1476 KiB  
Article
Capabilities and Opportunities of Flexitarians to Become Food Innovators for a Healthy Planet: Two Explorative Studies
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11135; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011135 - 09 Oct 2021
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 3214
Abstract
To support the transition to a more plant-based diet, it is necessary to better understand flexitarians, i.e., individuals who curtail their meat intake by abstaining from eating meat occasionally without fully abandoning meat. Much of the research about eating (less) meat thus far [...] Read more.
To support the transition to a more plant-based diet, it is necessary to better understand flexitarians, i.e., individuals who curtail their meat intake by abstaining from eating meat occasionally without fully abandoning meat. Much of the research about eating (less) meat thus far has focused on motivations. However, a dietary shift toward less meat consumption also demands that capabilities and opportunities be taken into account. The present study explores the capability and opportunity variables in terms of enablers and barriers to reduced meat consumption. Focus group discussions (Study 1) and a survey study (Study 2) were conducted. Study 1 provides an overview of what food consumers perceive as capabilities and opportunities in the context of limiting meat consumption. Study 2 quantifies the aspects of capabilities and opportunities with a special focus on enabling and constraining aspects regarding plant-based meat substitutes. Both studies examine what Dutch flexitarians designate as capabilities and opportunities in transitioning to eating less meat in everyday life. More insight into this helps to find and facilitate food choices that make the flexitarian choice an easier and more obvious one and consequently contribute to flexitarians as food innovators for a healthy planet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Innovation for Planetary Health)
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