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Dry Port Management and Sustainable Regional Development

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2021) | Viewed by 6582

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg, Sweden
Interests: dry ports; intermodal transport; inland waterways; short sea shipping; slow steaming; qualitative studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Logistics Department, Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11000, Serbia
Interests: logistics; supply chain; intermodal transport; logistics centers; city logistics; dry ports, humanitarian logistics; e-commerce logistics; multi-criteria decision making
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Transport and Traffic Sciences, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: transport; logistics; intermodal transport; sustainability; multi-criteria decision-making problems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of dry ports has gained significant attention from researchers around the globe (Figure 1), which has been promptly followed by practitioners, and today there are numerous dry ports established in different forms in countries such as Sweden, Finland, Spain, Holland, Germany, Russia, India, China, Vietnam, Malaysia, Australia, New Zealand, USA, Brazil, and Ethiopia to name the most researched countries. In the last 13 years, the number of publications on dry ports in the Scopus database (title and/or abstract) has grown from 2 to over 100 ((Khaslavskaya and Roso, 2020), Figure 2). The term “dry port” has been in use sporadically since the 1990s, but in the late 2000s the popularity of the dry port concept skyrocketed mainly due to its environmental perspective as recognized by Roso et al. (2009). The authors defined the concept as “an inland intermodal terminal directly connected to seaport(s) with high capacity transport mean(s), where customers can leave/pick up their standardised units as if directly to a seaport.” Still, after almost two decades, a recurring issue in research papers is different efforts to find other definitions for dry ports, such as extended gates, advanced intermodal terminals, inland ports, etc. (Witte et al., 2020).

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Figure 1. Top-contributing authors (number of publications in the brackets) and the Scopus citations of these authors’ dry port publications (from January 2020).

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Figure 2. Number of research items published per year (Khaslavskaya and Roso, 2020).

Therefore, with this Special Issue we would like to invite papers dealing with dry ports in any form or notion in use, as long as high-capacity transport modes are in use. In particular, we would like to receive papers researching real-life cases of dry ports. The implications of this Special Issue will be a much better understanding of the impact of dry ports on regional development, considering environmental, social, and economic sustainability. It will hopefully give significant inputs to practitioners and decision-makers dealing with the planning, design, and establishment of dry ports worldwide.

The aim of this Special Issue is to publish high-quality papers addressing emerging sustainability issues related to dry ports. We welcome the submission of original and high-quality research fitting the Special Issue’s theme that have neither been published nor are currently under review by other journals. Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a peer-review procedure and careful editorial scrutiny.

References:

  1. Khaslavskaya, A., Roso, V. 2020. Dry ports: research outcomes, trends, and future implications. Maritime Economics and Logistics (2020). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41278-020-00152-9)
  2. Roso, V; Woxenius, J; Lumsden, K (2009) The dry port concept: connecting container seaports with the hinterland. Journal of Transport Geography, 17 (5) pp. 338-345.
  3. Witte, P., Wiegmans, B., Roso, V. and Hall, P. (2020) Critical review: Moving beyond land and water: Understanding the development and spatial organization of inland ports. Journal of Transport Geography. SI Volume 84, April 2020, 102676.

This SI is intended to present the latest research in the area of dry ports. We encourage papers on all aspects of qualitative and quantitative research related to dry ports, such as:

  • Dry ports for sustainable regional development;
  • Dry ports from environmental, social, and economic perspectives;
  • Dry port network design for sustainable transport;
  • Regulatory issues related to dry ports implementation, operations and ownership;
  • Policy measures concerning the dry ports;
  • Sustainable hinterland transport via dry ports/inland ports;
  • Hinterland transport actors and their roles for dry ports/ports;
  • Stakeholders and their role in dry port management;
  • Rail and inland waterway development and involvement in intermodal transportation via dry ports;
  • Information technological solutions related to dry ports;
  • Seaport expansions and infrastructure connections to dry ports;
  • Optimization of dry port functions;
  • Design and development of dry ports (subsystems, physical characteristics, layout);
  • Tools for dry port location optimization;
  • Dry port efficiency evaluation;
  • Dry port establishment in developing economies;
  • Dry port market segmentation;
  • Dry port influence on the supply chain management;
  • Issues related to the operationalization of dry ports.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Violeta Roso
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Snežana Tadić
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Nikolina Brnjac
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dry port
  • inland port
  • sustainability
  • regional development
  • efficiency

Published Papers (2 papers)

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21 pages, 8943 KiB  
Article
Determining Optimal Dry Port Location for Seaport Rijeka Using AHP Decision-Making Methodology
by Josip Božičević, Ivica Lovrić, Dajana Bartulović, Sanja Steiner, Violeta Roso and Jasmina Pašagić Škrinjar
Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 6471; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13116471 - 7 Jun 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3058
Abstract
Seaport Rijeka is located and connected to the strategic EU TEN-T transport routes (Mediterranean and Baltic–Adriatic Corridor). Seaport Rijeka represents the shortest connection between Central and Central-Eastern Europe, and overseas destinations, by land and sea, and is in an excellent position to take [...] Read more.
Seaport Rijeka is located and connected to the strategic EU TEN-T transport routes (Mediterranean and Baltic–Adriatic Corridor). Seaport Rijeka represents the shortest connection between Central and Central-Eastern Europe, and overseas destinations, by land and sea, and is in an excellent position to take advantage of its location. Being the largest and busiest seaport in Croatia, with constant increase in cargo traffic, especially container traffic, with inadequate and incomplete transport infrastructure that creates congestion, Seaport Rijeka will soon reach its capacity limits. One of the possible solutions that would satisfy the increasing demand and mitigate existing problems is establishing a dry port. Establishing a dry port serving Seaport Rijeka on the EU transport routes would greatly contribute to the strategic and operational plans of the EU and Croatia. The focus of this paper is to determine the optimal dry port location for Seaport Rijeka. The AHP methodology was used to determine the optimal dry port location of the Seaport Rijeka, by analyzing a large set of influential factors. The analysis was performed for three groups of possible dry port locations (close, medium distance and distant). Results suggest that optimal dry port locations for Seaport Rijeka are in Miklavlje, Velika Gorica and Vinkovci. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dry Port Management and Sustainable Regional Development)
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25 pages, 3097 KiB  
Article
The Selection of Intermodal Transport System Scenarios in the Function of Southeastern Europe Regional Development
by Snežana Tadić, Milovan Kovač, Mladen Krstić, Violeta Roso and Nikolina Brnjac
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5590; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105590 - 17 May 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2497
Abstract
The development of intermodal transportation (IT) systems is of vital importance for the sustainability of logistics activities. The existing research point at individual directions of action for system improvement and increase of IT participation in overall transportation, thus reducing negative impacts of logistics [...] Read more.
The development of intermodal transportation (IT) systems is of vital importance for the sustainability of logistics activities. The existing research point at individual directions of action for system improvement and increase of IT participation in overall transportation, thus reducing negative impacts of logistics on sustainability. However, there is a lack of research defining complex scenarios that unite existing ideas and concepts of IT system development and improvement. Accordingly, this article deals with the definition and selection of the most appropriate IT development scenario for the region of Southeastern Europe. Six different potential scenarios that differ in the network configuration, the required level of logistics infrastructure development, the role of different IT terminal categories, the involvement of different transportation modes, and goods flows’ transformation degree, are defined. The scenarios are analyzed according to four stakeholder groups and twelve defined criteria. A novel hybrid multi-criteria decision-making model, based on fuzzy Delphi, fuzzy Factor Relationship (FARE), and fuzzy Measurement of Alternatives and Ranking according to Compromise Solution (MARCOS) methods, is developed for solving the problem. The definition and analysis of the problem, the way of establishing the scenarios, as well as the development of a novel hybrid model are the main contributions of this article. A significant contribution is also the consideration of the Dry Port (DP) concept for the first time in the context of river ports. The results indicate that the scenario referring to the development of the IT core network with the Danube DP terminals is potentially the most appropriate scenario for the Southeastern Europe IT system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dry Port Management and Sustainable Regional Development)
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