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Energy Poverty, Inequality and Sustainable Development

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 24 September 2024 | Viewed by 2760

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Applied Mathematics Department, Faculty of Engineering Gipuzkoa, University of the Basque Country, 20600 Eibar, Spain
Interests: poverty; inequality and welfare

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to announce a new Special Issue, “Energy Poverty, Inequality and Sustainable Development”, of the journal Sustainability.

On 25 September 2015, world leaders adopted a set of global goals to eradicate poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all as part of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda. Each goal has specific targets to be achieved over the next 15 years. Some of the Sustainable Development Goals focus on ending energy poverty, fighting inequality and injustice, and tackling climate change. More specifically, energy poverty is directly related with the first SDG (SDG-1),whose objective is No Poverty. Inequality in general can be linked to SDG-5 and SDG-10, which are Gender Equality and Reduced Inequalities, respectively. Finally, sustainable development is practically related to the 17 SDG, since some of them are necessary for sustainable development, for example, SDG-11 Sustainable Cities and Communities and SDF-12 Responsible Consumption and Production; and others can be seen as a consequence of a sustainable development, for example, SDG-3 Good Health and Well-being and SDG-4 Quality Education.

Therefore, the global goals are important, world-changing goals that will require cooperation between governments, international organizations and world leaders. To achieve these goals, everyone has to do their part: governments, the private sector, civil society and evidently the researchers.

The journal Sustainability is launching a Special Issue devoted to energy poverty, inequality and sustainable development. Our aim is for this Special Issue to contribute to new theoretical and empirical developments. This Special Issue is also devoted to offer practical solutions to emerging problems related with energy poverty, inequality and sustainable development in the post-COVID world. It would also be interesting to know what role policymakers should play in making sustainable development more effective, as well as their relations with the scientific world. Specific theoretical and methodological studies would lead to more effective policies for both poverty and inequality reduction and more sustainable development.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Energy poverty;
  • Inequality;
  • Sustainable development.

Dr. Oihana Aristondo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy
  • poverty
  • inequality
  • sustainable development

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

36 pages, 5899 KiB  
Article
Matchmaking in Off-Grid Energy System Planning: A Novel Approach for Integrating Residential Electricity Demands and Productive Use of Electricity
by Nikolas Schöne, Tim Ronan Britton, Edouard Delatte, Nicolas Saincy and Boris Heinz
Sustainability 2024, 16(8), 3442; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16083442 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 584
Abstract
Off-grid electrification planning increasingly recognizes the importance of productive use of electricity (PUE) to promote community value creation and (financial) project sustainability. To ensure a sustainable and efficient integration in the community and energy system, PUE assets must be carefully evaluated to match [...] Read more.
Off-grid electrification planning increasingly recognizes the importance of productive use of electricity (PUE) to promote community value creation and (financial) project sustainability. To ensure a sustainable and efficient integration in the community and energy system, PUE assets must be carefully evaluated to match both the community needs and the residential electricity demand patterns. We propose a novel methodology interlinking qualitative interviews, statistical analysis and energy system modeling to optimize decision making for PUE integration in off-grid energy systems in rural Madagascar by aligning relevant PUE effectively with anticipated residential electricity demand patterns based on socio-economic determinants of the community. We find that a possible contribution of the PUE to reducing the electricity costs depends significantly on three factors: (1) The residential electricity consumption patterns, which are influenced by the socio-economic composition of the community; (2) The degree of flexibility of (i) PUE assets and (ii) operational preferences of the PUE user; and (3) The capacity of community members to finance and operate PUE assets. Our study demonstrates that significant cost reductions for PUE-integrated off-grid energy systems can be achieved by applying our proposed methodology. When matching PUE and residential consumption patterns, the integration of PUE assets in residential community energy systems can reduce the financial risk for operators, provided the PUE enterprise operates reliably and sustainably. We highlight that the consideration of local value chains and co-creation approaches are essential to ensure the energy system is addressing the community’s needs, creates value for the community, enhances the project’s financial sustainability and is achieving the overall objectives of decentralized energy system planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Poverty, Inequality and Sustainable Development)
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21 pages, 879 KiB  
Article
Proposing a Novel Minimum Income Standard Approach to Energy Poverty Assessment: A European Case Study
by Roberto Barrella, José Carlos Romero and Lucía Mariño
Sustainability 2022, 14(23), 15526; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142315526 - 22 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1398
Abstract
Energy deprivation can be identified as a manifestation of general poverty. Indeed, the former should be studied in connection with economic poverty since energy vulnerability is closely linked to a low-income level. To explore this connection, this paper proposes a novel Minimum Income [...] Read more.
Energy deprivation can be identified as a manifestation of general poverty. Indeed, the former should be studied in connection with economic poverty since energy vulnerability is closely linked to a low-income level. To explore this connection, this paper proposes a novel Minimum Income Standard (MIS) approach to energy poverty indicators. In particular, this work applies the reference budgets method to the case of Spain and compares the obtained MIS indicator with one calculated using the Integration Minimum Income (RMI in Spanish) as a threshold. The results of the MIS indicator calculated with different income thresholds were critically analysed to establish a disproportionate expenditure metric based on an absolute income threshold obtained with an objective methodology. The outcomes show that the reference budget MIS indicators are generally higher than those obtained with the RMI, with the latter unable to identify energy poverty amongst certain household typologies. This result, together with the lack of scientific objectivity associated with the RMI, indicates that the reference budget MIS is more accurate when measuring an adequate minimum income. Eventually, this work might contribute to the measurement of (energy) poverty in Spain and the EU and inform policymakers to adequately target assistance programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Poverty, Inequality and Sustainable Development)
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