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Traffic Safety, Road User Attitudes and Sustainable Transportation

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2023) | Viewed by 7605

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Car crash-free driving is the optimal target, the vision that drives scientists, entrepreneurs, and stakeholders to achieve the fixed component of a sustainable strategy. Nowadays, an increased number of driving assistance systems offer drivers and passengers a high level of safety and comfort to protect vehicle occupants and other road users.

An important goal on the road to fatal incident-free driving for stakeholders and behavioural scientists is the sustainable implication of good practices and measures that increase public awareness of the importance of traffic safety, for example, through education programs and roadshows,, and provide information on safety technology and innovations. Certainly, to achieve a sustainable improvement in this sector, millions of citizens need to change their attitudes (e.g., a shift from individual car use to more sustainable traffic modes, such as walking or cycling, safe driving, etc.). This will not be possible without cooperation from citizens. As many of them as possible need to modify their own attitudes and preferences. To achieve this goal, their is necessary to use targeted psychological measures to motivate citizens to change. 

It is well known that both the stakeholders and the behavioural scientists know that the individual dependency on motor vehicles has a straightforward basis: if it is easier, faster, and more economic for an individual to travel by car/motorcycle, he or she will do it. Research has shown that it is a principle of microeconomics, which is the elasticity of the demand regarding the costs. Why would people walk, cycle, and take public transport if these are more difficult, time-consuming, and expensive than going by car? It is even worse when the city does not have a proper and safe infrastructure for these alternative modes of transportation.

Hence, sustainability in changing citizens’ attitudes and preferences should take into consideration fulfilling the needs of mobility without jeopardizing future generations with regard to natural resources and pollution levels. In this way, citizens’ motivation and education should concentrate on understanding that the emphasis should be given to the movement of people rather than the movement of individual motor vehicles, focusing on safe driving (e.g., exposure to  hazard reduction by  adopting  traffic  calming  measures,  physically  separating  traffic modes, physically separating traffic from other activities, defensive driving, following the road safety legislation, etc.), non-motorized transport, and on overcoming the problems related to urban and transportation planning due to the individual dependency on motor vehicles. 

It is important to reconsider ways to overcome the habits of perceiving and using individual motor vehicles given that society is organized around this mode of transport. Sustainable interventions and integrated strategies to change the way people perceive their daily choices to move, in addition to those for providing safe driving (e.g., human behaviour, low speed, traffic code compliance, etc.) in a safe infrastructure (e.g., sidewalks, pedestrian crossings, safer roads) require marketing to raise the awareness of the population regarding the external costs that the individual dependency on motor vehicles brings to society. 

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Car crash-free driving and sustainable safety interventions, education programs, and good practices;
  • Safety technology and innovations and sustainable traffic modes and infrastructures;
  • Attitudes and behaviours toward public awareness on traffic safety and sustainable road safety and traffic modes;
  • Interventions, attitudes, and behaviours toward public preferences with regard to their daily choices to move and their dependency on motor vehicles.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Joannes Chliaoutakis
Dr. Maria Papadakaki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • car crash-free driving
  • driving attitudes and preferences
  • sustainable good practices and measures
  • traffic safety education
  • transportation safe infrastructure
  • sustainable modes of transportation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 604 KiB  
Article
Towards Sustainable Transportation: The Role of Black Spot Analysis in Improving Road Safety
by Ioannis Karamanlis, Andreas Nikiforiadis, George Botzoris, Alexandros Kokkalis and Socrates Basbas
Sustainability 2023, 15(19), 14478; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151914478 - 04 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1308
Abstract
Sustainable transportation goals include an improvement in the level of road safety worldwide. It is well known that traffic accidents are one of the major causes of death worldwide. Black spots are road locations with a higher than statistically expected number of accidents. [...] Read more.
Sustainable transportation goals include an improvement in the level of road safety worldwide. It is well known that traffic accidents are one of the major causes of death worldwide. Black spots are road locations with a higher than statistically expected number of accidents. Remedying black spots would decisively improve road safety. A literature review of black spot identification methods, i.e., accident numbers, accident rates related to exposure, severity of accidents, Poisson and quality control methods, is presented within the framework of this paper. The various approaches adopted by key European and other countries are also summarized and evaluated. An important parameter is the unit length of a road, where accidents are referred. The quality of accident records is also critical. It is concluded that the coupling of statistical and accident severity index methods can contribute to assessing road infrastructure in a more holistic way and, therefore, in providing more reliable results with regard to the road safety level. The design and implementation of effective road safety strategies, based on black spot analysis, can be of great value for the decision makers and decision takers who are involved in the development of a sustainable transportation system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety, Road User Attitudes and Sustainable Transportation)
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20 pages, 3027 KiB  
Article
Analyzing the Effectiveness of Imbalanced Data Handling Techniques in Predicting Driver Phone Use
by Madhar M. Taamneh, Salah Taamneh, Ahmad H. Alomari and Musab Abuaddous
Sustainability 2023, 15(13), 10668; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151310668 - 06 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1178
Abstract
Distracted driving leads to a significant number of road crashes worldwide. Smartphone use is one of the most common causes of cognitive distraction among drivers. Available data on drivers’ phone use presents an invaluable opportunity to identify the main factors behind this behavior. [...] Read more.
Distracted driving leads to a significant number of road crashes worldwide. Smartphone use is one of the most common causes of cognitive distraction among drivers. Available data on drivers’ phone use presents an invaluable opportunity to identify the main factors behind this behavior. Machine learning (ML) techniques are among the most effective techniques for this purpose. However, the potential and usefulness of these techniques are limited, due to the imbalance of available data. The majority class of instances collected is for drivers who do not use their phones, while the minority class is for those who do use their phones. This paper evaluates two main approaches for handling imbalanced datasets on driver phone use. These methods include oversampling and undersampling. The effectiveness of each method was evaluated using six ML techniques: Multilayer Perceptron (MLP), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Naive Bayes (NB), Bayesian Network (BayesNet), J48, and ID3. The proposed methods were also evaluated on three Deep Learning (DL) models: Arch1 (5 hidden layers), Arch2 (10 hidden layers), and Arch3 (15 hidden layers). The data used in this document were collected through a direct observation study to explore a set of human, vehicle, and road surface characteristics. The results showed that all ML methods, as well as DL methods, achieved balanced accuracy values for both classes. ID3, J48, and MLP methods outperformed the rest of the ML methods in all scenarios, with ID3 achieving slightly better accuracy. The DL methods also provided good performances, especially for the undersampling data. The results also showed that the classification methods performed best on the undersampled data. It was concluded that road classification has the highest impact on cell phone use, followed by driver age group, driver gender, vehicle type, and, finally, driver seatbelt usage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety, Road User Attitudes and Sustainable Transportation)
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14 pages, 1283 KiB  
Article
A Survey of Electric-Scooter Riders’ Route Choice, Safety Perception, and Helmet Use
by Kelsey Sievert, Madeleine Roen, Curtis M. Craig and Nichole L. Morris
Sustainability 2023, 15(8), 6609; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15086609 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2121
Abstract
This study investigated electric-scooter (e-scooter) rider behaviors and preferences to inform ways to increase safety for e-scooter riders. Data was collected from 329 e-scooter riders via two online and one in-person survey. Survey questions considered rider roadway infrastructure preferences, safety perceptions, and helmet-wearing [...] Read more.
This study investigated electric-scooter (e-scooter) rider behaviors and preferences to inform ways to increase safety for e-scooter riders. Data was collected from 329 e-scooter riders via two online and one in-person survey. Survey questions considered rider roadway infrastructure preferences, safety perceptions, and helmet-wearing behavior. Protected bike lanes were more commonly indicated as the safest infrastructure (62.4%) but were less likely to be the most preferred infrastructure (49.7%). Sidewalks were better matched between riders, indicating them as their preferred riding infrastructure (22.7%) and the perceived safest riding infrastructure (24.5%). Riders had low feelings of safety and preference for riding on major/neighborhood streets or on unprotected bike lanes. Riders reported significant concern about being hit by a moving vehicle, running into a pothole/rough roadway, and running into a moving vehicle. In line with the Theory of Planned Behavior, a significant relationship was found between the frequency of riding and helmet-wearing behavior, with more frequent riders being more likely to wear helmets. Findings suggest that existing roadway infrastructure may pose safety challenges and encourage rider-selected workarounds. Public policy may consider emphasizing protected bicycle lane development, rather than helmet mandates, to support e-scooter riding safety for all vulnerable road users. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety, Road User Attitudes and Sustainable Transportation)
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14 pages, 819 KiB  
Article
Cross-Cultural Differences in Driving Styles: A Moderated Mediation Analysis Linking Forgivingness, Emotion Regulation Difficulties, and Driving Styles
by Berfin Töre, Meital Navon-Eyal and Orit Taubman – Ben-Ari
Sustainability 2023, 15(6), 5180; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065180 - 15 Mar 2023
Viewed by 2166
Abstract
Although various factors contributing to driving styles have been studied in recent decades, cultural differences have received little attention. Both emotion regulation difficulties and trait forgivingness have been found to be associated with driving styles, but the role of culture in these associations [...] Read more.
Although various factors contributing to driving styles have been studied in recent decades, cultural differences have received little attention. Both emotion regulation difficulties and trait forgivingness have been found to be associated with driving styles, but the role of culture in these associations has not been yet explored. The current study seeks to understand the mediating role of emotion regulation difficulties in the association between trait forgivingness and driving styles and whether this relationship differs in different cultures. To this end, a moderated mediation model was developed and tested among 823 drivers from Israel (n = 287), Turkey (n = 329), and the USA (n = 207). The participants completed the Forgivingness Scale, Multidimensional Driving Style Inventory (MDSI), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, and background details. The moderated mediation analysis was conducted using model 59 in the PROCESS macro developed by Hayes and Preacher (2013). The results show significant differences in all driving styles between the study groups. In addition, the mediation model for the angry and hostile and the reckless and careless driving styles was found to apply only to certain countries. The study highlights cultural differences and their importance in understanding the association between emotional processes and driving styles and the need to design culturally sensitive interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety, Road User Attitudes and Sustainable Transportation)
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