Surgical Resection

A special issue of Surgeries (ISSN 2673-4095).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2023) | Viewed by 3776

Special Issue Editor

1. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Pieve Emanuele, 20090 Milan, Italy
2. Divisionof Hepatobiliary and General Surgery, IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, 20089 Milan, Italy
Interests: liver surgery; hepatectomy; hepatic resection; colorectal liver metastases; translational research; prognostication in liver surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We welcome papers dealing with all aspects of resection. In particular, surgical resection of a tumor can be performed for many types of cancer. We invite you to co-create, with the aim of presenting the best proven practices, innovative clinical management, and prospects for the development of surgical resection.

Submitted manuscripts will formally undergo a rigorous peer-review process. All articles published by MDPI are made immediately available worldwide under an open access license.

Prof. Dr. Matteo Donadon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Surgeries is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gastrectomy
  • mastectomy
  • prostatectomy
  • lung resection
  • adrenalectomy
  • appendectomy
  • oophorectomy
  • thyroidectomy
  • hysterectomy
  • sympathectomy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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7 pages, 1594 KiB  
Case Report
Unique Constellation of Vascular Anomalies in a Female Cadaver: IVC, Renal Vein, and Left Colic Artery Variation
Surgeries 2024, 5(1), 6-12; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries5010003 - 04 Jan 2024
Viewed by 560
Abstract
Embryological development of the vascular system consists of growth and regression of developing vessels, often resulting in numerous variations. This cadaveric case report describes an individual with a duplicated inferior vena cava accompanied by multiple left accessory renal veins and a superior mesenteric [...] Read more.
Embryological development of the vascular system consists of growth and regression of developing vessels, often resulting in numerous variations. This cadaveric case report describes an individual with a duplicated inferior vena cava accompanied by multiple left accessory renal veins and a superior mesenteric artery-derived left colic artery. These structures may present clinical concerns when physicians are unaware of their presence during even routine surgeries. The 74-year-old female donor was dissected as part of a medical gross anatomy elective course. Anatomy was photographed and measurements were taken. Dissection revealed a duplicated inferior vena cava with a confluence between the right and left inferior venae cavae, known as the preaortic trunk. The left gonadal vein drained directly into the left inferior vena cava, inferior to the vena cava’s junction with the left renal vein. The multiple accessory left renal veins drained into the left inferior vena cava at the level of the primary left renal vein. All three anomalies examined in this donor have the potential to create complications during surgery. Promoting familiarity amongst physicians, particularly radiologists and surgeons, with vascular anomalies can aid in their ability to assess patients and provide better care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surgical Resection)
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7 pages, 704 KiB  
Brief Report
Thoracic Sympathectomy for Primary Hyperhidrosis: Focus on Post-Operative Age-Related Quality of Life
Surgeries 2023, 4(1), 127-133; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries4010014 - 20 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1099
Abstract
Primary focal hyperhidrosis is an idiopathic condition characterized by excessive sweating, predominantly localized in the hands and armpits. This condition affects about 1% of the general population and it is often associated with a deterioration of the Quality of Life (QoL), especially in [...] Read more.
Primary focal hyperhidrosis is an idiopathic condition characterized by excessive sweating, predominantly localized in the hands and armpits. This condition affects about 1% of the general population and it is often associated with a deterioration of the Quality of Life (QoL), especially in younger patients. Medical therapy, usually prescribed as a first approach, is associated with good results, but only in the short term. Surgery, on the other hand, is associated with a definitive resolution of the disease in most patients. Currently, there is no consensus on the timing of treatment and the final decision is often at the discretion of the physician and the patient. The aim of this study is to analyze the post-operative, age-related QoL in patients affected by primary hyperhidrosis treated by surgery by analyzing data of 56 patients who underwent biportal thoracoscopic sympathectomy between January 2016 and October 2019, dividing the patients into two groups: under and over the age of 25. The QoL was studied by administering the IIRS questionnaire pre-operatively and then six months after surgery. Data analysis demonstrated a lower complication rate in younger patients and equal post-operative outcomes in the two age groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surgical Resection)
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9 pages, 2465 KiB  
Case Report
Trans-Esophageal Echocardiography of the Descending Aorta and Celiac Trunk as an Intraoperative Monitoring for Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome (MALS) Treatment: Technique Proposal and Two Case Reports
Surgeries 2023, 4(1), 17-25; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries4010003 - 08 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1449
Abstract
Dunbar syndrome is caused by the compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament (MAL) and the diaphragmatic crura, presenting with abdominal pain. The treatment is surgical, with the aim of dissecting and separating the diaphragmatic crura from the celiac axis, [...] Read more.
Dunbar syndrome is caused by the compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament (MAL) and the diaphragmatic crura, presenting with abdominal pain. The treatment is surgical, with the aim of dissecting and separating the diaphragmatic crura from the celiac axis, restoring blood flow in the celiac trunk. We propose the use of transesophageal echocardiography to measure the peak systolic velocity in the celiac trunk and to evaluate, in real time, the efficacy of the surgery during MAL resection. Two clinical cases with practical implications are reported. In one of these, the ultrasound exam was useful in providing an intraoperative confirmation of the outcome of the resection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surgical Resection)
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