Laparoscopic Surgery

A special issue of Surgeries (ISSN 2673-4095).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 14110

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
General Surgery Department, Azienda ULSS 5 "Polesana", Ospedale Civile, 45100 Adria, RO, Italy
Interests: laparoscopic surgery; endoscopic surgery

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Guest Editor
Department of Surgery, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 50161 Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: laparoscopic surgery; trauma surgery; pancreatic surgery; tumors; cancer; surgical oncology; hepatobiliary surgery; surgical gastroenterology; colorectal surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive surgical technique used in the abdominal and pelvic areas. It is the latest revolution in surgery. Many common surgeries can be performed laparoscopically today. Laparoscopic surgery is becoming the preferred default method for a growing list of common operations, due to its improved patient outcomes. Smaller wounds reduce the risk of infection, blood loss, and postoperative complications (such as wound separation and incisional hernia). Laparoscopic surgery minimizes direct contact between the surgeon and the patient, which reduces the risk of any germ transmission between the two.

Research suggests that over 13 million laparoscopic procedures are performed globally every year. Laparoscopic surgery, with the use of a robotic platform, represents a promising field of investigation, and significant progress has been made in integrating robotic technologies with surgical instrumentation.

We invite you and your colleagues to submit high-quality papers reporting on this topic.

Dr. Ferdinando Agresta
Prof. Dr. Ẑilvinas Dambrauskas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Surgeries is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • laparoscopy
  • minimally invasive surgery
  • endoscopic surgery
  • robotic surgery

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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7 pages, 3950 KiB  
Communication
Management of Large Subcardial Diverticula in Sleeve Gastrectomy: Technical Tips
by Francesco Frattini, Antonella Pino, Giuseppe Cordaro, Georgios Lianos, Simona Bertoli and Gianlorenzo Dionigi
Surgeries 2023, 4(1), 134-140; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries4010015 - 20 Mar 2023
Viewed by 979
Abstract
Gastric diverticula are uncommon anatomic abnormalities that are usually asymptomatic or found incidentally in upper gastrointestinal radiographs with contrast or endoscopy. Gastric diverticula usually arise from the wall of the gastric fundus. Their preoperative study or intraoperative finding is of great importance in [...] Read more.
Gastric diverticula are uncommon anatomic abnormalities that are usually asymptomatic or found incidentally in upper gastrointestinal radiographs with contrast or endoscopy. Gastric diverticula usually arise from the wall of the gastric fundus. Their preoperative study or intraoperative finding is of great importance in patients with obesity who are scheduled for bariatric surgery. In bariatric surgery, and especially in sleeve gastrectomy, it is of utmost importance to know the exact location of the diverticulum in order to position the stapler correctly and to perform appropriate gastric resection including the diverticulum. Sleeve gastrectomy has gained popularity worldwide and currently accounts for the most performed bariatric procedure according to more recent international surveys. It is considered to be a technically easy procedure. Nonetheless, some steps of the procedure, such as gastric fundus mobilization and the gastric resection with the use of the stapler, may be challenging in patients with a high BMI and in the presence of abnormalities of the gastric wall. This can represent a risk for the occurrence of complications such as a gastric leak or bleeding. We propose some considerations about technical tips to adopt for safely performing sleeve gastrectomy in the presence of a subcardial diverticulum. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laparoscopic Surgery)
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10 pages, 259 KiB  
Article
Laparoscopic Intraperitoneal Onlay Mesh (IPOM): Short- and Long-Term Results in a Single Center
by Mario Giuffrida, Matteo Rossini, Lorenzo Pagliai, Paolo Del Rio and Federico Cozzani
Surgeries 2023, 4(1), 98-107; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries4010011 - 20 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 8413
Abstract
The laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair (IPOM) approach has become the most widely adopted technique in the last decade. The role of laparoscopic IPOM in the last years has been resizing due to several limitations. The aim of the present study is to [...] Read more.
The laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair (IPOM) approach has become the most widely adopted technique in the last decade. The role of laparoscopic IPOM in the last years has been resizing due to several limitations. The aim of the present study is to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes in patients who underwent laparoscopic IPOM. This retrospective single-center study describes 170 patients who underwent laparoscopic IPOM for ventral hernia at the General Surgery Unit of Parma University Hospital from 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2020. We evaluated patient, hernia, surgical and postoperative characteristics. According to the defect size, we divided the patients into Group 1 (Ø < 30 mm), Group 2 (30 < Ø < 50 mm) and Group 3 (Ø > 50 mm). A total of 167 patients were included. The mean defect diameter was 41.1 ± 16.3 mm. The mean operative time was different among the three groups (p < 0.001). Higher Charlson Comorbidity Index, obesity and incisional hernia were related to postoperative seroma and obesity alone with SSO. p < 0.001 Recurrence was significantly higher in larger defects (Group 3) and incisional hernia. p < 0.001. This retrospective study suggests that laparoscopic IPOM is a feasible and safe surgical technique with an acceptable complication rate, especially in the treatment of smaller defects up to 5 cm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laparoscopic Surgery)
12 pages, 1984 KiB  
Article
An Innovative Comparative Analysis Approach for the Assessment of Laparoscopic Surgical Skills
by Saiteja Malisetty, Hesham H. Ali, Elham Rastegari and Ka-Chun Siu
Surgeries 2023, 4(1), 46-57; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries4010007 - 1 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1330
Abstract
Over the past few decades, surgeon training has changed dramatically. Surgical skills are now taught in a surgical skills laboratory instead of the operating room. Simulation-based training helps medical students improve their skills, but it has not revolutionized clinical education. One critical barrier [...] Read more.
Over the past few decades, surgeon training has changed dramatically. Surgical skills are now taught in a surgical skills laboratory instead of the operating room. Simulation-based training helps medical students improve their skills, but it has not revolutionized clinical education. One critical barrier to reaching such a desired goal is the lack of reliable, robust, and objective methods for assessing the effectiveness of training sessions and the development of students. In this paper, we will develop a new comparative analysis approach that employs network models as the central concept in establishing a new assessment tool for the evaluation of the surgical skills of trainees as well as the training processes. The model is populated using participants electromyography data while performing a simulation task. Furthermore, using NASA Task Load Index score, participants’ subjective overload levels are analyzed to examine the impact of participants’ perception of their mental demand, physical demand, temporal demand, performance, effort, and frustration on how participants perform each simulation task. Obtained results indicate that the proposed approach enables us to extract useful information from the raw data and provides an objective method for assessment the of surgical simulation tasks and how the participants’ perception of task impacts their performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laparoscopic Surgery)
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Review

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13 pages, 8899 KiB  
Review
A Review on Tactile Displays for Conventional Laparoscopic Surgery
by Jacinto Colan, Ana Davila and Yasuhisa Hasegawa
Surgeries 2022, 3(4), 334-346; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries3040036 - 25 Nov 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2460
Abstract
Laparoscopic surgery (LS) is a minimally invasive technique that offers many advantages over traditional open surgery: it reduces trauma, scarring, and shortens recovery time. However, an important limitation is the loss of tactile sensations. Although some progress has been made in robotic-assisted minimally [...] Read more.
Laparoscopic surgery (LS) is a minimally invasive technique that offers many advantages over traditional open surgery: it reduces trauma, scarring, and shortens recovery time. However, an important limitation is the loss of tactile sensations. Although some progress has been made in robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS) setups, RMIS is still not widely accessible. This review aims to identify which tactile display technologies have been proposed and experimentally validated for the restoration of tactile sensations during conventional laparoscopic surgical tasks. We conducted a systematic review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We identified relevant articles published over the past 10 years through a search on Web of science, Scopus, IEEE Xplore Digital, and PubMed repositories. A total of 143 articles met the inclusion criteria and 24 were included in the final review. From the reviewed articles, we classified the proposed tactile displays into two categories based on the use of skin contact: (i) skin tactile displays, which include vibrotactile, skin-indentation, and grip-feedback devices, and (ii) non-contact tactile displays based on visualization tools. This survey aims to contribute to further research in the area of tactile displays for laparoscopic surgery by providing a better understanding of the current state of the art and identifying the remaining challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laparoscopic Surgery)
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