Surgery in Head and Neck Cancer

A special issue of Surgeries (ISSN 2673-4095).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 454

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Guest Editor
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy
Interests: head & neck cancer; surgery; clinical oncology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Head and neck cancer (HNC) management is incredibly challenging, and despite innovation in radiation oncology and the introduction of immunotherapy in the metastatic setting, surgery is still one of the key modalities used in HNC treatment. Recent advances, a greater awareness of the short- and long-term toxicities associated with non-surgical modalities, and newer technologies that permit minimal access resections have led to a resurgence in surgery.

The aim of surgery with curative intent in HNC is complete microscopic surgical excision. Excision margins are a consistent prognostic factor and a major consideration for more radical post-operative adjuvant therapy (and therefore more attendant morbidity), with the possible exception of thyroid cancer. Whilst there has been considerable progress with less invasive surgical access techniques, the underlying principle of profound importance in HNC is that surgical resection achieves complete and microscopic clearance of a tumor with an appropriate safety margin according to the type, site, and stage of the cancer.

HNC often requires complex, labor-intensive surgeries, especially when free flap reconstruction is required. Enhanced recovery is important in this patient population but evidence-based protocols on perioperative care for this population are lacking. Research on this field is also welcome.

We hope to collect a broad collection of high-quality articles that demonstrate the powerful research of scientists working in the field of head and neck cancer.

Prof. Dr. Oreste Gallo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Surgeries is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • head and neck cancer
  • HNSCC
  • surgical research and technologies
  • robotic surgery

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 2233 KiB  
Article
The Effectiveness of Inflammatory Indexes in Assessing Oropharyngeal Cancer Prognosis
by Wooyoung Jang, Jad F. Zeitouni, Daniel K. Nguyen, Ismail S. Mohiuddin, Haven Ward, Anu Satheeshkumar and Yusuf Dundar
Surgeries 2024, 5(2), 377-390; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries5020031 - 10 May 2024
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Abstract
Background: Inflammation has long been a key tenet in the diagnosis and management of malignancies, likely contributing to cancer incidence, staging, and progression. Systemic inflammation, in particular, is often elevated prior to and during cancer development. Systemic inflammation in the context of cancer [...] Read more.
Background: Inflammation has long been a key tenet in the diagnosis and management of malignancies, likely contributing to cancer incidence, staging, and progression. Systemic inflammation, in particular, is often elevated prior to and during cancer development. Systemic inflammation in the context of cancer diagnosis and monitoring is measured by various inflammatory indexes such as the systemic inflammatory response index (SIRI), plasma-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), systemic immune inflammation index (SII), and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). We set out to determine the relationship between pre- and post-treatment levels of these inflammatory indexes and the prognosis and outcomes of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed of 172 patients with OPC who underwent treatment for oropharyngeal cancer at University Medical Center in Lubbock, TX between May 2013 to May 2023. Sites of primary cancer were obtained through chart review. HPV infection status and differentiation of the tumor were noted for each patient. Treatment modalities were classified as surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or concurrent chemotherapy and radiation. Treatment outcomes were classified based on recurrence and death secondary to disease. The relationships between treatment outcome and the described inflammatory indexes were evaluated. Appropriate parametric tests were selected based on the large number of variables. Results: Pre-treatment SIRI and Albumin levels were positively predictive in determining locoregional recurrence (p = 0.031 and p = 0.039). NLR, SII, and SIRI levels taken at three months post-treatment were also found to be positively predictive of locoregional recurrence (p = 0.005, p < 0.0005, and p = 0.007). SIRI taken at six months post-treatment was also found to be positively predictive of locoregional recurrence (p = 0.008). SII at six months post-treatment was found to be positively predictive of survival (p = 0.027). Conclusion: This study suggested that post-treatment levels of several inflammatory indexes, particularly SIRI, NLR, and SII, may be useful in determining the long-term outlook and recurrence of head and neck cancer following treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surgery in Head and Neck Cancer)
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