Disaster Resilience, Disaster Politics, and Policies

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2021) | Viewed by 3968

Special Issue Editor

Center for the Study of Disasters and Emergency Management, Department of Political Science, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77381, USA
Interests: political institutions; disaster politics; cooperation and conflict; collective action; nuclear nonproliferation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Disasters are the product of the social, economic, and political environments in which hazards occur. While there is a large body of academic research on the first two, the study of the way disasters and politics interact is relatively new. This Special Issue seeks to build on this knowledge by focusing on the ways in which political factors affect disaster outcomes and the ways in which disaster outcomes, in turn, affect the post-disaster political environment. We invite articles focused on the politics of disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, and/or recovery. Articles can employ data from any country, and may focus on either single-country inquiries or cross-national comparisons.

Dr. Jason Enia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Disaster politics
  • Political institutions
  • Disaster resilience
  • Disaster policymaking
  • Political incentives and disasters
  • Political economy of disasters

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 3901 KiB  
Article
Understanding Social and Environmental Hazards in Urban Areas: An Analysis from Barranquilla, Colombia
by Marina B. Martínez-González, Celene B. Milanes, Jorge Moreno-Gómez, Samuel Padilla-Llano, Alex Vásquez, Allan Lavell, Ana Saltarín-Jiménez and Andrés Suárez
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(11), 411; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10110411 - 25 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3466
Abstract
The present research aims to understand the challenges faced by a Colombian city in the context of multidimensional risk scenarios, given the existing demographic and socio-economic conditions and local perspectives and perceptions regarding socio-environmental risks. The research was undertaken in the city of [...] Read more.
The present research aims to understand the challenges faced by a Colombian city in the context of multidimensional risk scenarios, given the existing demographic and socio-economic conditions and local perspectives and perceptions regarding socio-environmental risks. The research was undertaken in the city of Barranquilla, northern Colombia. A survey was designed to analyze (1) the general socio-economic and vulnerability conditions of a communities’ sample, (2) information related to hazards and disaster risk in their neighbourhoods, and (3) information on actions to mitigate risk. Three hundred and ninety-one people were surveyed. Likert scale and Pearson's Chi-square test and descriptive, inferential statistical methods, regression models, and the Mann–Whitney U test were used to process the results. Respondents lived, in general, under precarious socio-economic conditions (such as low income or lack of infrastructure and others). Given socio-environmental constraints, the research revealed that hazards such as urban stream flooding and robbery were the most negatively associated with the respondent’s quality of life. Regarding the actions to avoid losses, 84% of respondents had not implemented any preventive action. Respondents also have low awareness of the need to implement risk prevention actions. Social risks and the configuration of anthropic hazards stand out as principal centres for concern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disaster Resilience, Disaster Politics, and Policies)
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