Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (23 December 2022) | Viewed by 18719

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Political Studies and the Trent Centre for Aging and Society, Trent University, Peterborough, ON K9L 0G2, Canada
Interests: feminist; participatory and arts-based research; partnering with arts, environmental, disability, aging, healthcare

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Guest Editor
School of Disability Studies, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada
Interests: arts and culture; cultural representations of disability; leadership and community building; intersectional activist movements
Re•Vision Centre for Art and Social Justice, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
Interests: storymaking and creative methodologies; artistic research/research creation; accessibility and crip cultural practices; feminist studies; embodiment theory; digital interdisciplinarity; fat studies; disability studies
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Art orients to (re)worlding in affective, cultural, imaginative, and justice-attuned (re)ordering ways, and in so doing (re)visions/activates/produces/propels transformation with ripple effects through assemblages at multiple scales—local, regional, national, transnational. Arts that lead with/center/desire difference prefigure and materialize an infinite array of lived experiences into new aesthetics and possibilities for world-making. Art practices, performances, exhibitions, curatorial practices and documentation artifacts are spaces for cultural expression and resistance, imagining and enacting social justice, offering rich spaces for political possibilities. Where there is art, there is life such that access to art is access to life as art expresses and ciphers diverse and divergent materialities and futurities.

This call is inspired by Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology and Access to Life (BIT), a research project based in Canada at the University of Guelph with projects at Trent University and Ryerson University, among many universities and arts organizations. Research at Bodies in Translation is animated by two guiding propositions: that we incite and catalyze generative collaborations among artist and academics across disciplinary, sectorial, cultural, and other divides; and that we centralize culturally, cognitively, affectively, and physically diverse artist practitioners as members of communities whose voices and self-representations have been marginalized from mainstream social discourses, cultural landscapes and art institutions across the land now called the province of Ontario and Canada.

For this special issue, we seek theoretical, pedagogical, methodological, experimental/experiential, research-driven, art-based submissions, public scholarship, and other manuscripts exploring artistic processes and practices that prefigure and/or materialize new worlds and center a politics of difference (e.g. Indigenous, Black, Persons of Colour, d/Deaf, disabled, Mad, aging, fat, racialized, queer, trans, class). We understand “art” broadly and expansively, as including the creation of new aesthetics, methodologies/artful methods of inquiry (or ways of asking questions) futurities, politics, and political possibilities as well as performance, installation, curation, audience reception, and model practices. Similarly, we understand “politics” broadly and expansively, as of opposition, resistance, redistribution, movement(s), intervention(s), assemblage within relations of power visible and invisible for equity and/or world-(re)making. We welcome proposals that address methodologies and process, including social science arts-based research creation and humanities studio-based art and the intersection of the two, and impact broadly and at diverse scales -- impact for the artist/ art generators themselves, their communities and audiences, curational practice, including also collaborations, partnerships, and policies. We especially welcome articles that include and/or incorporate perspectives and voices of non-academic partners because we understand that partnerships comprise art generation, curation and production. Articles related to the following with attention to politics are welcome:

  • Accessibility/Critical Access
  • Aesthetics which center difference (Indigenous, Black, Persons of Colour, d/Deaf, disability, mad, queer, fat, youth, etc.)
  • Activist arts/Activist arts interventions
  • Arts broadly conceived to encompass dance, movement, visual, audio, theatre, performance, etc. and their multidisciplinarities, hybridities, and/or fusions
  • Indigenous arts
  • Decolonizing arts practices, presentations, methodologies
  • Unsettling settler discourses, institutions, symbols, culture
  • Aging arts
  • Black arts
  • d/Deaf arts
  • Disability arts
  • e/Elder arts
  • Mad arts
  • Queer arts
  • Feminist arts
  • Graffiti arts
  • Public murals
  • Street arts
  • Youth arts
  • Community arts
  • Performance arts
  • Post-human conceptions of arts and politics
  • Community-campus partnerships
  • Arts-based research
  • Research creation
  • Audience reception
  • Relaxed performance and other disability cultural practices
  • Arts and citizenship
  • Arts and labour partnerships/engagement
  • Arts and subaltern counterpublics
  • Coalition building/Change-making/Mobilizing
  • Affective dimensions of art and politics
  • Diverse spaces and spatialities for arts practices, rehearsal, performance, installation
  • Authorship and ownership in creative, community methodologies
  • Change making, disrupting, materializing of new practices, policies within communities, institutions, the state
  • Curatorial practice (Indigenous, Black, Aging, Crip, d/Deaf, Fat, Mad, Youth etc.)
  • Political openings, possibilities within and/or emerging from arts practice, performance, installation, incubators, curation, reception
  • Counterhegemonic narratives in/through art
  • Art making and new audiences
  • New voices of art making
  • Political relationships, relationship-building, coalitions, mobilizing across art and community boundaries (intercity, intercommunities, regional, national, transnational)
  • Documenting and cataloguing art (politics thereof, new renderings, new practices)
  • Resisting, changing, reordering power relations
  • Democratizing cultural production

Proposed abstracts (300-500 words) for research articles and author CVs indicating research areas can be emailed with the subject line “Rethinking Artful Politics” to Drs. Changfoot, Chandler and Rice c/o Marnie Eves, Administrative Assistant, Re•Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice, <revision@uoguelph.ca>, by the deadline of November 12, 2021. Abstracts should include the focus/plan for the article (e.g., proposed research question, methodology(ies), anticipated findings, discussion, significance, and references for any work cited in the abstract), authors (noting the corresponding author, if more than one author), affiliations and email addresses. Submissions for consideration for inclusion in the special issue will undergo a multi-stage process of peer-review, beginning with an initial review by the guest editors. Contributors will be notified of the decision on their abstract by early January 2022. Acceptance of an abstract does not guarantee inclusion in the special issue.

Dr. Nadine Changfoot
Dr. Eliza Chandler
Dr. Carla Rice
Guest Editors

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Art and aesthetics (art and aesthetics being understood broadly and expansively, especially art that leads with/centers/desires difference)
  • Politics and Political Possibilities
  • Bodies remaking bodyworlds
  • Centring bodies of difference (Indigenous, Black, Persons of Colour, Aging, d/Deaf, Disabled, e/Elder, Mad, Queer, Trans, Class)
  • Social Justice

Published Papers (11 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 303 KiB  
Article
Revisioning Fitness through a Relational Community of Practice: Conditions of Possibility for Access Intimacies and Body-Becoming Pedagogies through Art Making
by Meredith Bessey, K. Aly Bailey, Kayla Besse, Carla Rice, Salima Punjani and Tara-Leigh F. McHugh
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(10), 584; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12100584 - 23 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 900
Abstract
ReVisioning Fitness is a research project and community of practice (CoP) working to reconceptualize “fitness” through a radical embrace of difference (e.g., trans, non-binary, queer, Black, people of colour, disabled, and/or fat, thick/thicc, curvy, plus sized), and a careful theorising of inclusion and [...] Read more.
ReVisioning Fitness is a research project and community of practice (CoP) working to reconceptualize “fitness” through a radical embrace of difference (e.g., trans, non-binary, queer, Black, people of colour, disabled, and/or fat, thick/thicc, curvy, plus sized), and a careful theorising of inclusion and access. Our collaborative and arts-based work mounts collective resistance against the dominant power relations that preclude bodymind differences within so-called “fitness” spaces. In this work, we build queer, crip, and thick/thicc alliances by centring relational and difference-affirming approaches to fitness, fostering a radical CoP that supports dissent to be voiced, access intimacies to form, and capacitating effects of body-becoming pedagogies to be set in motion. In this article, we consider how conditions of possibility both co-created and inherited by researchers, collaborators, and the research context itself contributed to what unfolded in our project and art making (multimedia storytelling). By a radical CoP, we mean that we mobilise a more relational and difference-affirming notion of CoP than others have described, which often has involved the reification of sameness and the stabilisation of hierarchies. Further, we call on leaders in fitness organisations to open conditions of possibility in their spaces to allow for alternative futures of fitness that centre difference. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
23 pages, 4772 KiB  
Article
Re-Making Clothing, Re-Making Worlds: On Crip Fashion Hacking
by Ben Barry, Philippa Nesbitt, Alexis De Villa, Kristina McMullin and Jonathan Dumitra
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(9), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12090500 - 06 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1187
Abstract
This article explores how Disabled people’s fashion hacking practices re-make worlds by expanding fashion design processes, fostering relationships, and welcoming-in desire for Disability. We share research from the second phase of our project, Cripping Masculinity, where we developed fashion hacking workshops with D/disabled, [...] Read more.
This article explores how Disabled people’s fashion hacking practices re-make worlds by expanding fashion design processes, fostering relationships, and welcoming-in desire for Disability. We share research from the second phase of our project, Cripping Masculinity, where we developed fashion hacking workshops with D/disabled, D/deaf and Mad men and masculine non-binary people. In these workshops, participants worked in collaboration with fashion researchers and students to alter, embellish, and recreate their existing garments to support their physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. We explore how our workshops heeded the principles of Disability Justice by centring flexibility of time, collective access, interdependence, and desire for intersectional Disabled embodiments. By exploring the relationships formed and clothing made in these workshops, we articulate a framework for crip fashion hacking that reclaims design from the values of the market-driven fashion industry and towards the principles of Disability Justice. This article is written as a dialogue between members of the research team, the conversational style highlights our relationship-making process and praxis. We invite educators, designers, and/or researchers to draw upon crip fashion hacking to re-make worlds by desiring with and for communities who are marginalized by dominant systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
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17 pages, 2722 KiB  
Article
“It Really Put a Change on Me”: Visualizing (Dis)connections within a Photovoice Project in Peterborough/Nogojiwanong, Ontario
by Rosa Lea McBee
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(9), 488; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12090488 - 31 Aug 2023
Viewed by 710
Abstract
Photovoice is an arts-based participatory action research method that uses photography as a means for individuals, usually those facing marginalization, to document and foster group dialogue around the stories of their valuable lived experiences. This paper details a photovoice project run under the [...] Read more.
Photovoice is an arts-based participatory action research method that uses photography as a means for individuals, usually those facing marginalization, to document and foster group dialogue around the stories of their valuable lived experiences. This paper details a photovoice project run under the participatory planning project NeighbourPLAN, in Peterborough, Ontario, with the residents of the Downtown Jackson Creek group. The focus of the photovoice project was working with residents facing various forms of marginalization and barriers to reflect on what (dis)connections look like in their community. The findings conclude that photovoice generated new subjectivities, as residents reported feeling more connected to their community after taking photos. The process was generative in that it reminded residents of other creative outlets that they enjoyed doing and inspired them to engage with creative reflection in other ways. The findings also determined that green spaces, non-judgmental institutions, accessible amenities, safe housing, and well-maintained streets were critical for resident researchers’ feelings of connectedness. I conclude with recommendations from the residents’ feedback on the method and project, along with highlighting the promising potential of arts-based and storytelling methods when conducting research with marginalized groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
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14 pages, 312 KiB  
Article
Epistemological Weaving: Writing and Sense Making in Qualitative Research with Gloria Anzaldúa
by Luis R. Alvarez-Hernandez and Maureen Flint
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(7), 408; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12070408 - 16 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1325
Abstract
How is writing a part of creatively understanding ourselves, research questions, data, and theory? Writing is a critical form of connecting concepts, exploring data, and weaving knowledge in qualitative research. In other words, writing is integral to theorizing. However, writing is not an [...] Read more.
How is writing a part of creatively understanding ourselves, research questions, data, and theory? Writing is a critical form of connecting concepts, exploring data, and weaving knowledge in qualitative research. In other words, writing is integral to theorizing. However, writing is not an individualistic process. Writing is a relational and creative epistemological weaving of thoughts and embodiments constructed by researchers and their interactions with mentors and instructors, participants, and theoretical proponents. In this paper we discuss this creative process by paying attention to each co-constructor of knowledge and the ways in which the weaving of knowledge was constructed through our shared and different journeys as doctoral student and instructor. Grounded in Gloria Anzaldúa’s borderland and nepantla work, we will present our positionalities, interactions, and suggestions for fellow qualitative writers struggling to make sense of their writing and theorizing. Our hope is that doctoral students and veteran academics alike can benefit from this exploration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
19 pages, 1152 KiB  
Article
Reconstruct(ing) a Hidden History: Black Deaf Canadian Relat(ing) Identity
by Jenelle Rouse, Amelia Palmer and Amy Parsons
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(5), 305; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12050305 - 17 May 2023
Viewed by 2575
Abstract
Black Deaf Canadians are under-represented in every facet of life. Black Deaf Canadian excellence, history, culture, and language are under-documented and under-reported. Where are we in history? Where are we now? Why are we not being documented? Black Deaf Canada was established to [...] Read more.
Black Deaf Canadians are under-represented in every facet of life. Black Deaf Canadian excellence, history, culture, and language are under-documented and under-reported. Where are we in history? Where are we now? Why are we not being documented? Black Deaf Canada was established to address these long-standing issues and went on to create an independent research team that led a project called “Black Deaf History in Canada”. This article provides an early account of how the community-based research team conducted a relationship-building practice prior to and during a three-week research trip. Black Deaf Canadians’ relat(ing) experience in history has inspired us to fight for inclusivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
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21 pages, 3876 KiB  
Article
Beyond Utterances: Embodied Creativity and Compliance in Dance and Dementia
by An Kosurko and Melisa Stevanovic
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(5), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12050304 - 17 May 2023
Viewed by 1165
Abstract
Practices of creativity and compliance intersect in interaction when directing local dances remotely for people living with dementia and their carers in institutional settings. This ethnomethodological study focused on how artistic mechanisms are understood and structured by participants in response to on-screen instruction. [...] Read more.
Practices of creativity and compliance intersect in interaction when directing local dances remotely for people living with dementia and their carers in institutional settings. This ethnomethodological study focused on how artistic mechanisms are understood and structured by participants in response to on-screen instruction. Video data were collected from two long-term care facilities in Canada and Finland in a pilot study of a dance program that extended internationally from Canada to Finland at the onset of COVID-19. Fourteen hours of video data were analyzed using multimodal conversation analysis of initiation–response sequences. In this paper, we identify how creative instructed actions are produced in compliance with multimodal directives in interaction when mediated by technology and facilitated by copresent facilitators. We provide examples of how participants’ variably compliant responses in relation to dance instruction, from following a lead to coordinating with others, produce different creative actions from embellishing to improvising. Our findings suggest that cocreativity may be realized at intersections of compliance and creativity toward reciprocity. This research contributes to interdisciplinary discussions about the potential of arts-based practices in social inclusion, health, and well-being by studying how dance instruction is understood and realized remotely and in copresence in embodied instructed action and interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
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15 pages, 288 KiB  
Article
Performing Fat Liberation: Pretty Porky and Pissed Off’s Affective Politics and Archive
by Allison Taylor, Allyson Mitchell and Carla Rice
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(5), 270; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12050270 - 02 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1337
Abstract
This article uses collaborative auto/ethnography to explore the circulation and potentiality of affect in the live performances and archive of Pretty Porky and Pissed Off (PPPOd), a Toronto-based queer fat activist performance art collective active during the late 1990s and mid-2000s. Drawing on [...] Read more.
This article uses collaborative auto/ethnography to explore the circulation and potentiality of affect in the live performances and archive of Pretty Porky and Pissed Off (PPPOd), a Toronto-based queer fat activist performance art collective active during the late 1990s and mid-2000s. Drawing on video and audio recordings of five PPPOd performances alongside other performance ephemera and a series of conversations relating to these archival objects among the article’s three authors, we identify and theorize our affective responses to and situated recollections of these performances, both in their current form as archival objects and as historical live events. We argue that PPPOd’s archival objects/live performances disrupt the constellation of affects that constitute fat hate (e.g., fear, loathing, shame) and set in motion more affirmative affects (e.g., playfulness, pride, desire, love) that contribute to micro-worldings and prefigurative fat politics, as ephemeral as these might be. In capturing these fleeting moments of radical possibility, PPPOd’s activism and archive offer opportunities for touching and feeling a future where fat lives are more livable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
19 pages, 958 KiB  
Article
Honouring Differences in Recovery: Methodological Explorations in Creative Eating Disorder Recovery Research
by Andrea LaMarre, Siobhán Healy-Cullen, Jessica Tappin and Maree Burns
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(4), 251; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12040251 - 20 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2766
Abstract
What would it look like to honour differences in eating disorder recovery? Recoveries from eating disorders and eating distress are enacted in relation to discursive, material, and affective flows that open and constrain different possibilities for differently embodied people. Yet, the pull toward [...] Read more.
What would it look like to honour differences in eating disorder recovery? Recoveries from eating disorders and eating distress are enacted in relation to discursive, material, and affective flows that open and constrain different possibilities for differently embodied people. Yet, the pull toward establishing consensus on “what recovery is” continues to dominate the landscape of both qualitative and quantitative eating disorder recovery work. While researchers from a variety of perspectives, disciplines, and methodological traditions have sought to establish consensus on what recovery “is”, a singular definition remains elusive. Indeed, when researchers continue to adopt the same methodologies—which largely emphasize establishing patterns of sameness—the opportunity to dig into contradictions and tensions that enliven recoveries is missed. In this paper, we reflect on our experiences conducting creative, collaborative, generative research to re-write, re-design, re-draw, and otherwise re-imagine recoveries. The knowledge generated in our research is co-constructed with people with living experience of disordered/distressed eating/eating disorders who spoke back to mainstream recovery discourses (e.g., the idea that recovery is about perfection, that recovery is linear, that one is either recovered or not, that the word “recovered” encapsulates the experience, etc.). We engaged with 12 participants: four in an online group workshop and eight in individual online sessions. Participants held a variety of experiences and backgrounds from Canada, the United States, and Aotearoa New Zealand. We explored their journeys into this conversation with us, the meaning of recovery, and their thoughts on what makes recovery im/possible. Participants were offered several options for creative engagement and took up the idea of “creativity” in ways as different as the stories they shared. Participants created collages, short stories, poems, drawings, and told stories about their experiences. Here, we discuss methodological insights gained from asking participants to lead the creative process. We also explore how this project potentially enables different ways of thinking about and doing eating disorder recovery. Delving into the differences in both method and content opens up opportunities to take seriously the different relational, material, and affective constellations of participants’ living experiences of eating distress/disorder “recovery”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
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15 pages, 318 KiB  
Article
Towards Decolonial Choreographies of Co-Resistance
by Evadne Kelly, Carla Rice and Mona Stonefish
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(4), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12040204 - 30 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1434
Abstract
This article engages movement as a methodology for understanding the creative coalition work that we carried out for a project series called Into the Light (ITL) that used research from university archives to mount a museum exhibition and then develop an interactive public [...] Read more.
This article engages movement as a methodology for understanding the creative coalition work that we carried out for a project series called Into the Light (ITL) that used research from university archives to mount a museum exhibition and then develop an interactive public education site that counters histories and ongoing realities of colonial eugenics and their exclusionary ideas of what it means to be human in Canada’s educational institutions. We address different movement practices, both those initiated by ableist-colonial forces to destroy difference and by our coalition of co-resistors to affirm difference. We apply a decolonizing and Anishinaabe philosophical lens alongside a feminist disability-informed neomaterialist and dance studies one to theorize examples of ITL’s “choreographies of co-resistance”. Anishinaabe knowledge practices refuse and thus interfere with colonial-eugenic practices of erasure while enacting an ethic of self-determination and mutual respect for difference. The ripple effect of this decolonizing and difference-affirming interference reverberates through our words and moves at varying tempos through our bodies—traveling through flesh, holding up at bones, and passing through watery, stretchy connective tissue pathways. These are our choreographies of co-resistance as actions of mattering and world-building. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
19 pages, 388 KiB  
Article
Dinner Table Experience in the Flyover Provinces: A Bricolage of Rural Deaf and Disabled Artistry in Saskatchewan
by Chelsea Temple Jones, Joanne Weber, Abneet Atwal and Helen Pridmore
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(3), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12030125 - 24 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1151
Abstract
“Dinner table experience” describes the uniquely crip affect evoked by deaf and disabled people’s childhood memories of sitting at the dinner table, witnessing conversations unfolding around them, but without them. Drawing on 11 prairie-based deaf and/or disabled artists’ dinner table experiences, four researcher-artivist [...] Read more.
“Dinner table experience” describes the uniquely crip affect evoked by deaf and disabled people’s childhood memories of sitting at the dinner table, witnessing conversations unfolding around them, but without them. Drawing on 11 prairie-based deaf and/or disabled artists’ dinner table experiences, four researcher-artivist authors map a critical bricolage of prairie-based deaf and disabled art from the viewpoint of a metaphorical dinner table set up beneath the wide-skyed “flyover province” of Saskatchewan. Drawing on a non-linear, associative-thinking-based timespan that begins with Tracy Latimer’s murder and includes a contemporary telethon, this article charts the settler colonial logics of normalcy and struggles over keeping up with urban counterparts that make prairie-based deaf and disability arts unique. In upholding an affirmative, becoming-to-know prairie-based crip art and cultural ethos using place-based orientations, the authors point to the political possibilities of artmaking and (re)worlding in the space and place of the overlooked. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
17 pages, 299 KiB  
Article
Crip Time and Radical Care in/as Artful Politics
by May Chazan
Soc. Sci. 2023, 12(2), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci12020099 - 13 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2300
Abstract
This article brings together critical disability scholarship and personal narrative, sharing the author’s pandemic story of disruption, caregiving, grief, burnout, cancer, and post-operative fatigue. It offers critical reflection on the limits of the neoliberal academy and possibilities for practicing liberatory politics within it, [...] Read more.
This article brings together critical disability scholarship and personal narrative, sharing the author’s pandemic story of disruption, caregiving, grief, burnout, cancer, and post-operative fatigue. It offers critical reflection on the limits of the neoliberal academy and possibilities for practicing liberatory politics within it, posing two central questions: What does it mean to crip time and centre care as an arts-based researcher? What might a commitment to honouring crip time based on radical care do for the author and their scholarship, and for others aspiring to conduct reworlding research? This analysis suggests that while committing to “slow scholarship” is a form of resistance to ableist capitalist and colonial pressures within the academy, slowness alone does not sufficiently crip research processes. Crip time, by contrast, involves multiply enfolded temporalities imposed upon (and reclaimed by) many researchers, particularly those living with disabilities and/or chronic illness. The article concludes that researchers can commit to recognizing crip time, valuing it, and caring for those living through it, including themselves, not only/necessarily by slowing down. Indeed, they can also carry out this work by actively imagining the crip futures they are striving to make along any/all trajectories and temporalities. This means simultaneously transforming academic institutions, refusing internalized pressures, reclaiming interdependence, and valuing all care work in whatever time it takes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rethinking Artful Politics: Bodies of Difference Remaking Body Worlds)
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