Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 19138

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Humanities, Hellenic Open University, 263 35 Patras, Greece
Interests: intercultural/multicultural education; immigrant students' education; citizenship education; educational programmes and ICTs for immigrant students and multicultural classes

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Guest Editor
Department of Primary Education, University of Thessaly, 382 21 Volos, Greece
Interests: applied linguistics; language education; second language teacher development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

More multilingualism exists in more places and for more reasons than ever before because of globalization, geographical and social mobility, economic and political transformations, and rapid technological evolutions. Yet, when it comes to foreign language teaching in multicultural and multilingual environments, the impossibility of "one-size-fits-for-all" becomes even more indisputable as multilingualism may refer to different notions in different contexts from individual and social perspectives (Cenoz, 2013). Current theories based on superdiversity define multilingualism as "multilinguality" (Agnihotri, 2014), a natural phenomenon and cognitive processing of languages in the brain, and a tool to structure pedagogies in which languages are intertwined but not separate entities in the brain as well as in social behavior. Intercultural pedagogies should separately and equally value the multilinguality of each and every child in the classroom. Intercultural education and intercultural communication are at the forefront for educating all children to acquire new global competences and act as intercultural persons and global citizens (Palaiologou and Zembylas 2012). From this perspective, "every learner matters and matters equally" (UNESCO, 2017, pp. 12-13), which leads us to see individual differences not as problems to be fixed, but as opportunities to democratize and enrich learning and to "make sure that the multilinguality of every child becomes a part of the pedagogical process" (Agnihotri, 2014, p. 365).

In such a context, intercultural education can contribute to a classroom space where different identities, values, and practices co-exist, and also combine together to generate new identities, values, and practices (Wei, 2011, p. 1223).

Within this context, proposals are invited for a Special Issue of Societies that will focus on Migration and Multilingual Education: An intercultural perspective.

The issue, which will be edited by Prof. Nektaria Palaiologou as Leading Guest Editor and Dr. Achilleas Kostoulas as Co-Guest Editor, aims to bring together a range of empirically and theoretical contributions that will explore the nexus of multi-, pluri-, and translingual perspectives, through the lens of intercultural education.

Topics:

A non-exhaustive list of topics includes:

  • The marginalization or social exclusion of migrant and refugee students;
  • Intercultural education, communication, and competencies;
  • Bilingual education, language practices, and linguistic issues;
  • Multilingual education and school leaders;
  • Global competences.

In this Special Issue, contributions will either be articles, conceptual papers or reviews, and they must fit the scope of the journal and address the topic of the Special Issue.

References

  1. Agnihotri, R. K. (2014). Multilinguality, education and harmony. International Journal of Multilingualism, 11(3), 364-379.
  2. Cenoz, J. (2013). Defining multilingualism. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 33, 3-18.
  3. Dervin, F., Portera, A. and Yuan, M. (2022). Teaching and Learning Interculturality in Education around the World: Anything New under the Sun. MDPI Special issue. Societies.
  4. Palaiologou, N. and Zembylas, M. (2012). Mapping the Broad Field of Multicultural and Intercultural Education Worldwide: Towards the Construction of the New Citizen. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
  5. UNESCO (2017). Education for Sustainable Development Goals - Learning Objectives.
  6. Wei, L. (2011). Moment analysis and translanguaging space: Discursive construction of identities by multilingual Chinese youth in Britain. Journal of Pragmatics, 43(5), 1222-1235.

Dr. Nektaria Palaiologou
Dr. Achilleas Kostoulas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • intercultural education
  • plurilingualism
  • critial pedagogy

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Editorial

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5 pages, 138 KiB  
Editorial
Editorial for the Special Issue on Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective
by Nektaria Palaiologou and Achilleas Kostoulas
Societies 2024, 14(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc14010001 - 20 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1306
Abstract
In the early years of the 21st century, humanity faced two unprecedented global challenges: the intensifying effects of climate change and the devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)

Research

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22 pages, 934 KiB  
Article
Stakeholders’ Experiences and Perceptions of the Provision and Practice of Language Support for Ethnic Minority School Children in Japan
by Michi Saki
Societies 2023, 13(9), 197; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13090197 - 22 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1074
Abstract
This study examines experiences and perceptions concerning the provision of Japanese language support for ethnic minority school children between the ages of 6 and 12 enrolled in public elementary schools in a city located in the Kansai region of Japan (hereinafter referred to [...] Read more.
This study examines experiences and perceptions concerning the provision of Japanese language support for ethnic minority school children between the ages of 6 and 12 enrolled in public elementary schools in a city located in the Kansai region of Japan (hereinafter referred to as “City M”). This paper will focus in particular on interpreting the experiences and perspectives of language support teachers, volunteer interpreters, mother-tongue language supporters (hereafter referred to as MTLS) as well as three principals of three public elementary schools located in particularly different areas of the City M. Each of the school’s history, backgrounds and current situations are varied and unique. One-on-one interviews of 40 to 60 min in length were conducted with a total of 9 participants consisting of public elementary school principals and Japanese language support teachers. These results of the data collection provided a deeper understanding and explanation of the reasons behind current trends and challenges regarding the accessibility, implementation, provision, and practice of language learning support for ethnic minority school children. The findings from this research will increase awareness of current issues faced by practitioners supporting ethnic minority children in their learning. The research findings also provide insight into what obstacles need to be overcome in order to provide adequate, sufficient, and sustainable educational support for children from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds within the mainstream Japanese education system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
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15 pages, 274 KiB  
Article
Teaching about Culture or Learning with and from Others?
by Nataša Ciabatti
Societies 2023, 13(8), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13080194 - 17 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1580
Abstract
This article reports on the findings of a qualitative study conducted in Victoria, Australia. The study examined the perceptions and implementation of the intercultural dimension in the language classroom following recent curriculum changes. Data were collected from individual in-depth interviews with seven pre-service [...] Read more.
This article reports on the findings of a qualitative study conducted in Victoria, Australia. The study examined the perceptions and implementation of the intercultural dimension in the language classroom following recent curriculum changes. Data were collected from individual in-depth interviews with seven pre-service teachers with a migrant background enrolled in a graduate initial teacher education program who were undertaking the practicum component of this course in Victorian secondary schools. Findings from this study highlight discrepancies between interpretations of the intercultural capability in theory and the way it is taught. Remarkably, what emerged was the impact of personal experiences on pre-service teachers’ conceptualizations and implementation of intercultural pedagogies. This study suggests a new definition for intercultural capability that emphasizes the importance of not only teaching about cultural diversity, but also learning from and through it. The study also recognizes the need for critical and reflective discussions in teacher education so that teachers are supported to become agents of change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
10 pages, 780 KiB  
Article
The Global Institutionalization of Multicultural Education as an Academic Discourse
by Saerom Lee, Yun-Kyung Cha and Seung-Hwan Ham
Societies 2023, 13(8), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13080191 - 16 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2068
Abstract
Multicultural education has been widely recognized as an educational approach to deal with social and cultural diversity towards a more inclusive and just society. Conventional perspectives tend to assume that multicultural education would be of greater interest as a research topic in countries [...] Read more.
Multicultural education has been widely recognized as an educational approach to deal with social and cultural diversity towards a more inclusive and just society. Conventional perspectives tend to assume that multicultural education would be of greater interest as a research topic in countries with growing levels of diversity. However, based on a macro-phenomenological perspective, this study accounts for influences from the wider institutional environment that gives collective meaning and value to legitimize multiculturalism as an academic discourse topic. Using a cross-national research design, this study examined the national-level characteristics associated with the formation of academic discourse on multicultural education. Scholarly articles on multicultural education published in the field of education by 2020 were collected using the research platform Web of Science. A total of 105 countries with 14,220 articles were analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Our results showed that countries with stronger ties to global civil society were more likely to have articles on multicultural education, indicating a higher institutionalization level of relevant academic discourse within the country. These findings suggest that the popularity of multicultural education as an academic discourse may not solely be in response to national-level societal demands but rather may be an institutional embodiment of universalistic norms and values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
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24 pages, 5690 KiB  
Article
Introducing “Trans~Resistance”: Translingual Literacies as Resistance to Epistemic Racism and Raciolinguistic Discourses in Schools
by Madjiguene Salma Bah Fall
Societies 2023, 13(8), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13080190 - 14 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1269
Abstract
Translingual students’ identities transcend multiple languages and cultural allegiances. Sociolinguistics widely discusses the linguistic and racial oppressions these students face in schools due to epistemic racism, which is often observed in the tension between their multilingual and multimodal communicative styles and language perspectives [...] Read more.
Translingual students’ identities transcend multiple languages and cultural allegiances. Sociolinguistics widely discusses the linguistic and racial oppressions these students face in schools due to epistemic racism, which is often observed in the tension between their multilingual and multimodal communicative styles and language perspectives rooted in monolingual and monocultural ideologies. This paper expands on the literature that denounces epistemic racism, uses Raciolinguistics and New Literacy Studies as theoretical frameworks, and reports on the following inquiries: What are the characteristics of delegitimizing school stakeholders who become agents of epistemic racism in their interactions with translingual students? How do translingual students reject these agents’ marginalization? Critical focus groups, semi-structured and arts-based interviews, and emplaced observations were used to collect data, centering the identities and voices of participants. Two key findings emerged. First, school stakeholders with various roles, social power, and degree of impact epitomize epistemic racism through ideological discourses. Second, “Translinguals” resist through novel concepts for which I have coined the terms "Covert and Overt Transresistance,” enacted by the means of resisting transliteracies. The theoretical, research, and practical implications of these findings, along with recommendations for future research, are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
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9 pages, 1362 KiB  
Article
German Language Teaching in a Multicultural Class in Greece: A Case Study about Students’ and Parents’ Perceptions of Plurilingualism
by Charikleia Liakou
Societies 2023, 13(8), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13080187 - 12 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 937
Abstract
After many decades of research, publications, and exchange of good practices, the debate about intercultural pedagogy, the importance of bilingual education and the promotion of existing multiculturalism in school classes remains topical in the public educational system in Greece. My ongoing research interest [...] Read more.
After many decades of research, publications, and exchange of good practices, the debate about intercultural pedagogy, the importance of bilingual education and the promotion of existing multiculturalism in school classes remains topical in the public educational system in Greece. My ongoing research interest focuses on the inclusive education of students with migrant backgrounds, taking into account the foreign language lessons in public education in Greece, specifically the teaching of German as a second foreign language. The empirical part of the study took place in a public primary school in a Province of the city of Karditsa during the school year 2021/2022. A class of 18 students of the 6th Grade, where 7 of them were bilingual/multilingual with a migrant background, was under research during the second and third trimester in the German language lesson. The research work is based on the methodology of the Functional-Pragmatics language theory by Ehlich and Rehbein. The data analysis is in progress; however, questionnaires were given to all participant students, and interviews were conducted with all bilinguals parents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
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15 pages, 296 KiB  
Article
A Multi-Method Profiling of Adult Refugees and Migrants in an L2 Non-Formal Educational Setting: Language Needs Analysis, Linguistic Portraits, and Identity Texts
by Argyro Kyrligkitsi and Anna Mouti
Societies 2023, 13(8), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13080186 - 10 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1378
Abstract
This paper will attempt to visualize adult refugees and migrants, as well as a specific multilingual and multicultural educational setting in Greece. This study aspires to depict/present the plurilingual profiles, language needs, and challenges of L2 Greek students through a variety of tools/methods, [...] Read more.
This paper will attempt to visualize adult refugees and migrants, as well as a specific multilingual and multicultural educational setting in Greece. This study aspires to depict/present the plurilingual profiles, language needs, and challenges of L2 Greek students through a variety of tools/methods, e.g., questionnaires, portraits, narratives, needs analysis, and assessment tools. In a complementary way, this research focuses on highlighting the value of language portraits, identity texts, and translanguaging in L2 Greek classrooms. Conditions regarding the educational process in the specific educational setting will also be discussed. This was a case study conducted in an open school for migrants in Greece. Eight volunteer teachers at the school and twenty students participated in this research through a multimethod research design. Multilingual profiles and learners’ needs and goals became visible, and the teachers managed to “hear” the multilingual voices of their students and understand their multilingual profiles. Overall, it is clear that these findings pave the way for large-scale research to investigate in depth everything presented in this research. Using language portraits and identity texts as group activities helps to conduct a productive discussion in the classroom, through which students gain access to the use of concepts such as “multilingualism”, “multiculturalism”, and “diversity”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
14 pages, 725 KiB  
Article
Memorizing Vocabulary in Multilingual Classrooms: Strategies Adopted by Teachers in Distance Education
by Thomais Rousoulioti and Eleftheria Seferiadou
Societies 2023, 13(8), 183; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13080183 - 05 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1343
Abstract
The aim of this research is to investigate the usage and assessment of vocabulary memorization strategies adopted by teachers of Greek as a second/foreign language (L2) in multilingual classrooms. In particular, it investigates which vocabulary memorization strategies are adopted in distance education and [...] Read more.
The aim of this research is to investigate the usage and assessment of vocabulary memorization strategies adopted by teachers of Greek as a second/foreign language (L2) in multilingual classrooms. In particular, it investigates which vocabulary memorization strategies are adopted in distance education and whether or not there are differences in the frequency of their usage within face-to-face education, as well as how effective teachers consider them to be. Research results show that the most popular strategies in distance education are the strategies of reading aloud (92%), linking the new word to students’ previous personal experiences (89%), and using synonyms–antonyms (87%), although there is no significant difference among the strategies that teachers adopt in face-to-face and distance education with some minor variations in statistics. Furthermore, it was shown that the frequency of a strategy’s usage is related to how important teachers consider it to be. Regarding the assessment of memorization strategies, it is of particular interest that in most cases the frequency of usage of a strategy is proportionate to the effectiveness attributed to it by teachers. After the teachers’ assessment, the strategies of reading aloud (89%), picture making (87%) and using synonyms–antonyms (86%) are in the top three. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
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12 pages, 447 KiB  
Article
Teaching the Greek Language in Multicultural Classrooms Using English as a Lingua Franca: Teachers’ Perceptions, Attitudes, and Practices
by Aretousa Giannakou and Kyriaki Karalia
Societies 2023, 13(8), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13080180 - 03 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1117
Abstract
The present study examines teachers’ perceptions, attitudes, and practices regarding the use of English as a lingua franca (ELF) to teach Greek as a second language (L2) in multicultural classrooms in Greece, a largely underexplored area in the field of applied linguistics. The [...] Read more.
The present study examines teachers’ perceptions, attitudes, and practices regarding the use of English as a lingua franca (ELF) to teach Greek as a second language (L2) in multicultural classrooms in Greece, a largely underexplored area in the field of applied linguistics. The research was based on self-reports collected through questionnaires, written accounts, metaphor elicitation, and semi-structured interviews provided by 20 teachers of young learners with a migrant background in public schools in Greece. The findings showed that the classroom discourse takes place mainly in the target language, i.e., Greek, and ELF was also reported to be used by both teachers and learners for specific functions, such as vocabulary translation, explanation of grammar rules, and checking for comprehension. As reported by the participants, both teachers and learners welcome the idea of ELF use because a sense of security and comfort is provided through its employment. The study suggests that ELF may allow a smooth transition into the new social reality of the host country and a better approach of L2 Greek for young learners with a migrant background in the context of multilingual and intercultural education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
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13 pages, 251 KiB  
Article
Perceptions of ZEP Teachers towards Parental Involvement of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families: Promoting School–Family Cooperation
by Malamati Bachtsiavanou, Zoe Karanikola and Nektaria Palaiologou
Societies 2023, 13(7), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13070159 - 04 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1174
Abstract
Parental involvement of super-diverse families in the educational process is an integral part of the integration of emergent bilingual students, which, however, entails obstacles to its implementation in Greek schools and worldwide. Τhe present study investigates, through a qualitative case study, the perceptions [...] Read more.
Parental involvement of super-diverse families in the educational process is an integral part of the integration of emergent bilingual students, which, however, entails obstacles to its implementation in Greek schools and worldwide. Τhe present study investigates, through a qualitative case study, the perceptions of eight primary school teachers who had worked in zones of educational priority (ZEPs) in Greek public education, which are also called reception classes, towards the involvement of immigrant and refugee parents in the educational process as well as the barriers that influence it. The methodological tool of semi-structured interviews was used, while the sample was selected with both the convenience and snowball sampling techniques. Some important results reveal the usefulness of parental involvement for all involved persons in the school–family partnership as well as the multiple obstacles to its implementation. The main difficulties encountered by the participants were the parents’ lack of competence in Greek or in an intermediate language as well as their unfamiliarity with a culturally different education system. In response to this reality, the establishment of translation services at school with language and cultural interpreters that could bridge theses distances while recognizing families’ differences as an asset rather as an obstacle emerges as a necessity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
12 pages, 2074 KiB  
Article
Exploring Migrant Students’ Attitudes towards Their Multilingual Identities through Language Portraits
by Antonia Stavrakaki and Peggy Manoli
Societies 2023, 13(7), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13070153 - 27 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 967
Abstract
The increasing linguistic and cultural diversity in contemporary societies inevitably affects the field of education by challenging teachers to cope with the coexistence of different languages in the classroom. The present research was intended to investigate migrant children’s attitudes towards languages through language [...] Read more.
The increasing linguistic and cultural diversity in contemporary societies inevitably affects the field of education by challenging teachers to cope with the coexistence of different languages in the classroom. The present research was intended to investigate migrant children’s attitudes towards languages through language portraits in order to help educators obtain insights into student multilingual repertoires and experiences. To this end, by adopting a qualitative approach, the study used linguistic portraits and semi-structured interviews to collect the data. The participants of the study were 10 primary school children whose ages ranged from 8 to 12 with a migrant background who have been living in Greece, particularly on the island of Crete. Using the method of content analysis, the findings of the study indicated that migrant children made specific color choices based on flags, emotions, and world experience, and they put colors on parts of the body according to their functions, which signified students’ multilingual identities and experiences. Moreover, the findings highlighted multilingual students’ need to negotiate their multiple linguistic repertoires, make choices between the languages, prioritize them, rank them, or give priority to the second language, Greek, without, however, abandoning their first languages. The present study aspires to contribute to the relevant research and draws implications for the implementation of multilingual education and culturally sustaining pedagogies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
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13 pages, 341 KiB  
Article
Intercultural Opportunities to Evoke Empathy toward Minority Citizens: Online Contact with Chinese International Students at a Japanese Women’s University
by Chie Sugino
Societies 2023, 13(6), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13060132 - 23 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1054
Abstract
Exchanges with Chinese students in Japan, who comprise the majority of international students, may be a worthwhile intercultural experience for Japanese students. However, because of the lack of contact between Chinese and Japanese students on campus, many Japanese students tend to form impressions [...] Read more.
Exchanges with Chinese students in Japan, who comprise the majority of international students, may be a worthwhile intercultural experience for Japanese students. However, because of the lack of contact between Chinese and Japanese students on campus, many Japanese students tend to form impressions of China through the media. This study aims to explore the factors influencing Japanese students’ positive attitudes toward Chinese students and the former’s awareness of stereotypes based on an online interview in Japanese conducted during an elective political science course. This study adopts a qualitative research methodology to analyze students’ written reflections contextually. The content analysis revealed that Chinese students’ “Japaneseness”, characterized by Japanese language fluency, affected the perceptions of Japanese students, who changed their attitudes toward Chinese people and intercultural exchanges. Further discussion is necessary to determine whether Japanese students’ preferences for “Japanese-like” international students may create new stereotypes rather than enhance diversity benefits. The findings illustrate the need for future research and practice on how students with no experience in communicating with minority citizens can overcome ethnocentric perspectives and embrace diversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
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8 pages, 189 KiB  
Article
“Refugees in the Amphitheatre”: An Intercultural Action Research on Co-Educating Student Teachers and Peer Refugees
by Kostas Magos
Societies 2023, 13(3), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13030060 - 06 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 957
Abstract
The contribution of action research to teacher education as well as to refugee education has been highlighted in the international literature. Through action research, teachers can link educational theories with everyday school practices. In addition, the participation of refugees in action research, especially [...] Read more.
The contribution of action research to teacher education as well as to refugee education has been highlighted in the international literature. Through action research, teachers can link educational theories with everyday school practices. In addition, the participation of refugees in action research, especially in cooperation with members of the dominant ethnic and cultural group, could play a significant role in their empowerment and social inclusion. This article describes the content and the results of an action research, which took place in the context of an academic course in a Greek University. The aim of the action research was the interaction between students and peer refugees and, through it, the development of intercultural competence and empathy. The action research developed in three cycles, featuring the students and refugees’ participation in intercultural routes–walks. The action research findings showed that the participation in the abovementioned walks supported the intercultural communication and interaction among the group members, as well as the reflection on refugee identity stereotypes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)

Other

Jump to: Editorial, Research

10 pages, 220 KiB  
Concept Paper
Reflections for Transforming the Perspectives of Teacher-Directed Practices towards Community-Based Ethnographic Practices with Migrant and Minority Students
by Martha Montero-Sieburth
Societies 2023, 13(8), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc13080189 - 14 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 811
Abstract
This conceptual paper represents the retrospective/current reflections and findings from teacher education research of an intercultural educator gathered over 45 years of research in country-specific schools. Considered are the perspectives of primary and secondary school teachers who teach migrant/minority students and who are [...] Read more.
This conceptual paper represents the retrospective/current reflections and findings from teacher education research of an intercultural educator gathered over 45 years of research in country-specific schools. Considered are the perspectives of primary and secondary school teachers who teach migrant/minority students and who are influenced by national policies which expose them to new local intercultural classroom practices. Its intent is to question the use of homogenized teacher-directed practices that not only essentialize these students’ traditions, customs, cultures, religions, and languages but also project a deficit model in classrooms which minimalizes their contributions. Proposed is the deconstruction of homogenized, rigid teacher-directed practices arising from their professional training, classroom teaching, and pedagogy, towards community-based ethnographic (CBE) practices so that teachers, students, and ethnographers can immerse themselves in classroom participatory inquiry and critical thinking that unpacks students’ lives and creates dialogical processes that identify, utilize, and legitimize local “funds of knowledge”. By implementing a CBE approach, a more realistic understanding of the educational contexts, experiences, and perspectives of migrant/minority students and their teachers can be identified to develop interculturally ladened learning activities and content that concretely address diversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migration and Multilingual Education: An Intercultural Perspective)
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