Editorial Board Members' Collection Series: Sex Differences, Sexual Development, and Sexual/Reproductive Health

A special issue of Sexes (ISSN 2411-5118).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 4146

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Investigación Médica Mercedes y Martín Ferreyra, INIMEC-CONICET-Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, X5016NST Córdoba, Argentina
Interests: gonadal hormones; brain sex differentiation; sex chromosomes; X-linked genes; hypothalamus; epigenetics; neuronal growth; GABA

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA
Interests: sexual and reproductive health; migrants and other vulnerable groups; community based interventions; health and human rights

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pediatric and Adolescent Endocrinology, Division of Paediatrics, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana, 56126 Pisa, Italy
Interests: disorders/differences of sex development (DSD); children with DSD; testis function; puberty; bone health; hormonal substitutive therapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce this collection entitled “Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Sex Differences, Sexual Development, and Sexual/Reproductive Health”. This Issue will be a collection of papers from researchers invited by the Editorial Board Members. This Special Issue mainly focuses on the fields of sex differences, sexual development, sexual and reproductive health, etc. The aim is to provide a venue for networking and communication between Sexes and scholars in these fields. All papers will be published as fully open access after peer review.

Prof. Dr. María Julia Cambiasso
Prof. Dr. Sally Guttmacher
Dr. Silvano Bertelloni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sexes is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sex differences
  • gender differences
  • sexual development
  • disorders of sex development
  • sexual health
  • reproductive health

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

19 pages, 934 KiB  
Review
Sex Differences in Autonomic Blood Pressure Regulation: Sex Chromosome Complement and Hormonal Involvement
by Ximena E. Caeiro, Gabriela V. Silva and Andrea Godino
Sexes 2023, 4(4), 536-554; https://doi.org/10.3390/sexes4040035 - 18 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1130
Abstract
Although several lines of evidence from different studies highlight sex differences in cardiovascular diseases, to date, most studies have been focused on males, with the idea that males and females are similar, differing only in the magnitude of the response. However, the principles [...] Read more.
Although several lines of evidence from different studies highlight sex differences in cardiovascular diseases, to date, most studies have been focused on males, with the idea that males and females are similar, differing only in the magnitude of the response. However, the principles learned in male models cannot and should not be extrapolated to women and, therefore, it is important to study in greater detail not only the differences between the sexes but also the physiological intertwining of the underlying genetic and hormonal mechanisms of sexual dimorphism. This review explores the sex disparities in the autonomic nervous system regulation of blood pressure (particularly baroreceptor function), with special emphasis on sex hormones and sex chromosome complement factors involved in sexually dimorphic autonomic blood pressure regulation. A more detailed understanding of the sources of physiological disparities between the sexes may also help in understanding the differences between the sexes in rates of cardiovascular disease and may also aid in designing future improvements for sex-tailored therapeutic treatments. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

34 pages, 2211 KiB  
Review
Sex Differences in Mouse Models of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Their Potential to Uncover the Impact of Brain Sexual Differentiation on Gender Bias
by Verónica Murta, Araceli Seiffe and Amaicha Mara Depino
Sexes 2023, 4(3), 358-391; https://doi.org/10.3390/sexes4030024 - 25 Jul 2023
Viewed by 2459
Abstract
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition with a prevalence rate of 2.78%, and it is characterized by deficits in sociability and communication and restricted patterns of interests and activities. Remarkably, this psychiatric disorder exhibits a pronounced gender bias, with 80% of [...] Read more.
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition with a prevalence rate of 2.78%, and it is characterized by deficits in sociability and communication and restricted patterns of interests and activities. Remarkably, this psychiatric disorder exhibits a pronounced gender bias, with 80% of children diagnosed with ASD being boys. In this review, we will present advancements in mouse models of ASD and their potential contributions to our understanding of the disorder. We will highlight how initial pre-clinical investigations focused solely on male mice due to the gender bias in ASD and explain why we believe that this approach might have had detrimental consequences regarding our understanding of ASD etiology and pathophysiology. We will highlight the evidence of two sensitive periods during brain development when differential exposure to gonadal hormones may result in sex differences in brain function and behavior: the perinatal period and the pre-pubertal period. Finally, we will suggest neuroinflammation as a feasible biological mechanism that may converge different ASD etiological factors and cellular mechanisms into a brain sexual differentiation context, thus accounting for the gender disparities observed in the disorder. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop