Extraction and Application of Functional Components in Food

A special issue of Separations (ISSN 2297-8739). This special issue belongs to the section "Analysis of Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2023) | Viewed by 3615

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
REQUIMTE, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: natural products; bioactivities; electrochemistry; biosensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nutrition and Bromatology Group, Department of Analytical Chemistry and Food Science, Faculty of Science, University of Vigo, E-32004 Ourense, Spain
Interests: food chemistry; food technology; bioactive compounds; analytical techniques; natural food products; natural cosmetics; emergent technologies; green processes; sustainability; bioinformatics; chemical engineering; synergy; antagonism; natural and synthetic antioxidants; mathematical modeling; biological responses; toxicology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
REQUIMTE/LAQV-ISEP, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: algae; natural products; bioactivities; antimicrobial tests
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Functional components are (bio)molecules with the capacity to modulate one or more metabolic processes or pathways in the human body, resulting in health benefits and the promotion of wellbeing.

Functional components can be found in food, beverages, and byproducts and include carotenoids, dietary fiber, fatty acids, flavonoids, isothiocyanates, phenolic acids, plant stanols and sterols, polyols, prebiotics and probiotics, and phytoestrogens.

Some properties which link functional components to potential health-modulating roles and functions can be classified into antioxidation, anticancer, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, cardiovascular, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and anti-hypertensive. In this context, functional components can be applied in the food industry as replacers of synthetic food additives.

This Special Issue on the “Extraction and Application of Functional Components in Food” will focus on: i) the extraction, separation, and isolation of functional components from food, beverages, and byproducts; ii) the main analytical techniques used to quantify/characterized functional components; and iii) application of functional components in food and beverages.

Dr. Maria Fátima Barroso
Prof. Dr. Miguel A. Prieto Lage
Dr. Aurora Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Separations is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional components
  • food
  • beverages
  • extraction-based methods
  • chromatographic-based techniques
  • bioactivity-based assays
  • food analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

23 pages, 2417 KiB  
Article
Interactions between Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) Protein and Phenolics and In Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestibility
by Fatma Duygu Ceylan, Hilal Yılmaz, Nabil Adrar, Deniz Günal Köroğlu, Busra Gultekin Subasi and Esra Capanoglu
Separations 2022, 9(12), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations9120406 - 2 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1895
Abstract
In this study, we investigated the formation of protein–phenolic complexes from dephenolized hazelnut meal protein isolates (dHPI) and hazelnut skin phenolic extracts (HSE) and their effects on the bioaccessibility of both hazelnut proteins and phenolics. The dHPI–HSE complexes were of considerable size and [...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated the formation of protein–phenolic complexes from dephenolized hazelnut meal protein isolates (dHPI) and hazelnut skin phenolic extracts (HSE) and their effects on the bioaccessibility of both hazelnut proteins and phenolics. The dHPI–HSE complexes were of considerable size and were dependent on HSE concentration due to aggregation. Although catechin was the main component of HSE, it did not cause aggregation, except for a slight rise in particle size. According to fluorescence quenching, the hazelnut protein–phenolic extract complex had a linear Stern–Volmer plot expressing static quenching between 0–0.5 mM concentration; the interaction was mainly dependent on hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces (ΔH < 0 and ΔS < 0), and the reaction was spontaneous (ΔG < 0). According to Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results, higher phenolic extract concentration caused an increase in irregular structures in hazelnut protein, while the lowest catechin and phenolic concentration altered the regular structure. Skin extracts did not alter the digestibility of dephenolized proteins, but dephenolization reduced the degree of hydrolysis by pancreatin. The formation of the protein–phenolic complex had a beneficial effect on the bioaccessibility of hazelnut skin phenols, predominantly those on the galloylated form of the catechins, such as gallocatechin gallate and epigallocatechin gallate. Thus, the bioaccessibility and antioxidant activity analysis results showed that protein–phenolic complexes obtained from hazelnut meal and skin may promote the transition of phenolic compounds from the gastrointestinal tract without degradation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extraction and Application of Functional Components in Food)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

7 pages, 633 KiB  
Communication
Process Optimization Based on Biological Effects and Biomarker Contents of Camellia japonica L. for the Development of Anti-Hyperuricemic and Anti-Wrinkle Source
by Seung-Yub Song, Dae-Hun Park, Ki-Wan An and Seung-Sik Cho
Separations 2022, 9(10), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations9100281 - 2 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1156
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to simultaneously develop anti-hyperuricemic and anti-wrinkle source using Camellia japonica leaf (CJ). CJ extract was prepared. Its contents of biomarkers and biological activities were then analyzed. First, we investigated the extraction efficiency. The extraction rate was [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to simultaneously develop anti-hyperuricemic and anti-wrinkle source using Camellia japonica leaf (CJ). CJ extract was prepared. Its contents of biomarkers and biological activities were then analyzed. First, we investigated the extraction efficiency. The extraction rate was 10% or less with hot water or 80% ethanol. HPLC analysis revealed that CJ extract contained rutin, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, chlorogenic acid (CGA), gallocatechin gallate (GCG), and phillygenin. As a result of measuring contents of biomarkers in the extract, CGA was detected in 20, 40, and 60% ethanol extracts. GCG showed the highest content in the hot water extract. Hyperoside and isoquercitrin showed the highest contents in the 80% ethanol extract. Philligenin showed an even content of 0.1% or more in all samples except for 40% ethanol extract. Rutin showed the highest content in 80% ethanol extract. Elastase inhibitory abilities of six extracts and PPRM were investigated at a concentration of 0.5 mg/mL. Results revealed that PPRM and 80% ethanol extract showed about 80% and 62% inhibition, respectively. As a result of comparing elastase inhibitory activities of biomarkers, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, and philligenin showed higher activities. Among six extracts, the extract that could be used as an anti-hyperuricemic source was 80% ethanol extract. When xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activities of biomarkers were evaluated, rutin and hyperoside showed excellent activities. In particular, when XO activity was measured by mixing rutin and hyperoside with 80% ethanol extract, the same efficacy as 80% ethanol extract was obtained. It was predicted that 80% ethanol extract could be used simultaneously as an anti-hyperuricemic and anti-wrinkle source. Further studies are needed to determine anti-hyperuricemic activities of rutin and hyeproside in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extraction and Application of Functional Components in Food)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop