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Sensors for Human Safety Monitoring

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019) | Viewed by 18724

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, Universita degli Studi di Messina, I-98166 Messina, Italy
Interests: synthesis of novel sensing materials; nanostructured materials for chemical and electrochemical sensing; metal oxide semiconductor-based gas sensors; biosensors; fabrication of chemical sensors; environmental sensors; automotive gas sensors; biomedical sensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Alagappa University
Interests: Biomaterials; Biosensors; Chemical Sensors; Materials Science

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Guest Editor
Australian National University, Research School of Engineering, Canberra, Australia
Interests: nanotechnology; self-assembly; sensors; nanomedicine; functional coatings; renewable energy production and chemical storage; aerosols; flame synthesis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Alagappa Univ, Dept Bioelect & Biosensors, Karaikkudi 630003, Tamil Nadu, India

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Human health is one of the main focuses of research in technology and medicine, as they can greatly increase life expectancy and make life easier for people with diseases.  These two fields—technology and medicine—complement each other, and the highlights of one sometimes come hand-in-hand with the other. That is what exactly happens with sensors applied to human health monitoring.

The new generation of chemical and physical sensors can be used for detecting a variety of diseases by non-invasive methods, such as the measurement of volatile organic compounds in the exhaled human breath and biomarkers in saliva which are much safer and less painful for the patients than traditional invasive methods. Similarly, fiber-optic sensors are helpful for surgeons to precisely identify the diseased part of the organ to be operated on without needing to anesthetize the patient. The other advantages of such sensors include lower power consumption by enabling miniaturization and portability, cost effectiveness, ease of use, and ability to be connected to the Internet of Things.

This Special Issue aims to provide the current state-of-the-art of every kind of chemical and physical sensor, such as optical, conductometric, gravimetric, electrochemical, MEMS, and so on, which find potential applications in the field of modern medical technology for health, safety, home rehabilitation, assessment of treatment efficacy, and early detection of disorders. We also aim to address future challenges and obstacles that need to be surpassed in order to achieve the highest efficiency in human health monitoring.

Therefore, contributions to this Special Issue may include, but are not limited to:

  • Novel sensing techniques for the non-invasive measurement of biomarkers in breath and other physiological body fluids
  • Sensors for the early detection of disorders
  • New insights into sensors providing information on the physiological state of people
  • Recent advances in sensor materials, properties, and device concepts for the non-invasive monitoring of chemical and physical body parameters
  • Optical sensing fiber-optic distributed sensors
  • Semiconductor gas sensors for breath analysis
  • Electrochemical sensors for the label-free detection of biomolecules
  • Miniaturized chemical sensors and MEMS sensor technologies for human health care
  • Point-of-care (POC) sensors
  • Biomedical application of wearable and wireless sensor technology
  • Communication technology and data analysis techniques applied to medical sensors

Prof. Giovanni Neri
Prof. Chinnathambi Sekar
Prof. Antonio Tricoli
Dr. Nehru Lavanya
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 2637 KiB  
Article
Graphene-Oxide-Based Electrochemical Sensors for the Sensitive Detection of Pharmaceutical Drug Naproxen
by Lanting Qian, Antony Raj Thiruppathi, Reem Elmahdy, Joshua van der Zalm and Aicheng Chen
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1252; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051252 - 25 Feb 2020
Cited by 74 | Viewed by 7543
Abstract
Here we report on a selective and sensitive graphene-oxide-based electrochemical sensor for the detection of naproxen. The effects of doping and oxygen content of various graphene oxide (GO)-based nanomaterials on their respective electrochemical behaviors were investigated and rationalized. The synthesized GO and GO-based [...] Read more.
Here we report on a selective and sensitive graphene-oxide-based electrochemical sensor for the detection of naproxen. The effects of doping and oxygen content of various graphene oxide (GO)-based nanomaterials on their respective electrochemical behaviors were investigated and rationalized. The synthesized GO and GO-based nanomaterials were characterized using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, while the associated amounts of the dopant heteroatoms and oxygen were quantified using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of the GO, fluorine-doped graphene oxide (F-GO), boron-doped partially reduced graphene oxide (B-rGO), nitrogen-doped partially reduced graphene oxide (N-rGO), and thermally reduced graphene oxide (TrGO) were studied and compared via cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). It was found that GO exhibited the highest signal for the electrochemical detection of naproxen when compared with the other GO-based nanomaterials explored in the present study. This was primarily due to the presence of the additional oxygen content in the GO, which facilitated the catalytic oxidation of naproxen. The GO-based electrochemical sensor exhibited a wide linear range (10 µM–1 mM), a high sensitivity (0.60 µAµM−1cm−2), high selectivity and a strong anti-interference capacity over potential interfering species that may exist in a biological system for the detection of naproxen. In addition, the proposed GO-based electrochemical sensor was tested using actual pharmaceutical naproxen tablets without pretreatments, further demonstrating excellent sensitivity and selectivity. Moreover, this study provided insights into the participatory catalytic roles of the oxygen functional groups of the GO-based nanomaterials toward the electrochemical oxidation and sensing of naproxen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Human Safety Monitoring)
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15 pages, 4959 KiB  
Article
Monitoring of Chemical Risk Factors for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) by Hydroxyapatite-Graphene-MWCNT Composite-Based Sensors
by Narayanan Sudhan, Nehru Lavanya, Salvatore Gianluca Leonardi, Giovanni Neri and Chinnathambi Sekar
Sensors 2019, 19(15), 3437; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19153437 - 05 Aug 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 4645
Abstract
Sensing properties of chemical sensors based on ternary hydroxyapatite-graphene-multiwalled carbon nanotube (HA-GN-MWCNT) nanocomposite in the detection of chemical substances representing risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), have been evaluated. Characterization data of the synthesized composite have shown that the graphene-MWCNT network [...] Read more.
Sensing properties of chemical sensors based on ternary hydroxyapatite-graphene-multiwalled carbon nanotube (HA-GN-MWCNT) nanocomposite in the detection of chemical substances representing risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), have been evaluated. Characterization data of the synthesized composite have shown that the graphene-MWCNT network serves as a matrix to uniformly disperse the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and provide suitable electrical properties required for developing novel electrochemical and conductometric sensors. A HA-GN-MWCNT composite-modified glassy carbon electrode (HA-GN-MWCNT/GCE) has been fabricated and tested for the simultaneous monitoring of nicotine and caffeine by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV), whereas a HA-GN-MWCNT conductive gas sensor has been tested for the detection of CO2 in ambient air. Reported results suggest that the synergic combination of the chemical properties of HA and electrical/electrochemical characteristics of the mixed graphene-MWCNT network play a prominent role in enhancing the electrochemical and gas sensing behavior of the ternary HA-GN-MWCNT hybrid nanostructure. The high performances of the developed sensors make them suitable for monitoring unhealthy actions (e.g., smoking, drinking coffee) in breastfeeding women and environmental factors (bad air quality), which are associated with an enhanced risk for SIDS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Human Safety Monitoring)
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Review

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17 pages, 1808 KiB  
Review
Metabolic Syndrome—An Emerging Constellation of Risk Factors: Electrochemical Detection Strategies
by Madhurantakam Sasya, K. S. Shalini Devi, Jayanth K. Babu, John Bosco Balaguru Rayappan and Uma Maheswari Krishnan
Sensors 2020, 20(1), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20010103 - 23 Dec 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3965
Abstract
Metabolic syndrome is a condition that results from dysfunction of different metabolic pathways leading to increased risk of disorders such as hyperglycemia, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders etc. As this condition cannot be diagnosed based on a single marker, multiple markers need [...] Read more.
Metabolic syndrome is a condition that results from dysfunction of different metabolic pathways leading to increased risk of disorders such as hyperglycemia, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders etc. As this condition cannot be diagnosed based on a single marker, multiple markers need to be detected and quantified to assess the risk facing an individual of metabolic syndrome. In this context, chemical- and bio-sensors capable of detecting multiple analytes may provide an appropriate diagnostic strategy. Research in this field has resulted in the evolution of sensors from the first generation to a fourth generation of ‘smart’ sensors. A shift in the sensing paradigm involving the sensing element and transduction strategy has also resulted in remarkable advancements in biomedical diagnostics particularly in terms of higher sensitivity and selectivity towards analyte molecule and rapid response time. This review encapsulates the significant advancements reported so far in the field of sensors developed for biomarkers of metabolic syndrome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Human Safety Monitoring)
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