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Optical Gas Sensing and Applications

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 1748

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laser Spectroscopy and Sensing Laboratory, Anhui University, Hefei 230601, China
Interests: laser spectroscopy; optical sensing; signal processing algorithm
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Laser Spectroscopy and Sensing Laboratory, Anhui University, Hefei 230601, China
2. School of Mathematics Physics and Finance, Anhui Polytechnic University, Wuhu 241000, China
Interests: laser absorption spectroscopy; photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy; gas sensing; quartz tuning fork detector
Advanced Laser Diagnostics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Interests: environmental research; gas sensing; wavelength modulation spectroscopy; optical frequency combs; fourier transform spectroscopy; cavity ring-down spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The principle of optical gas sensing technology is to use the absorption, scattering and transmission characteristics of light to convert gas concentration into photoelectric signal so as to achieve the measurement of gas concentration information. Laser absorption spectroscopy, such as tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS), and dual-comb spectroscopy (DCS), etc., has demonstrated its powerful capabilities for quantitative gas analysis due to its high sensitivity, high selectivity, real-time use and non-invasive characteristics. There are a variety of different spectral techniques employed for trace gas detection, including direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS), wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), etc. These spectral techniques have different advantages so as to be used in different application scenarios. We strongly encourage the development of state-of-the-art spectrometers and applying them to different scenarios including atmospheric chemistry, soil ecology, industrial process, combustion diagnosis and other gas sensing fields. Only if we can measure the concentration of these trace species and evaluate their natural or anthropogenic source and sinks can we propose appropriate strategies for atmospheric environmental governance and sustainability. This Special Issue will provide a collection of the latest technical solutions and application findings of optical gas sensors in the fields of environment/health, industrial control, energy exploration, biomedicine, etc.

Prof. Dr. Jingsong Li
Dr. Linguang Xu
Dr. Ningwu Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • state-of-the-art gas sensing strategies
  • trace species detection
  • greenhouse gas emission
  • industrial process monitoring and control
  • tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy
  • fourier transform spectroscopy
  • frequency combs
  • laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy
  • advanced-data analysis methods

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 7427 KiB  
Article
Polarization Property Associated with Surface Plasmon Resonance in a Palladium Thin-Film Coated Aluminum Grating in a Conical Mounting and Its Application to Hydrogen Gas Detection
by Toyonori Matsuda, Isao Tsunoda, Shinichiro Koba, Yu Oshiro and Hiroyuki Odagawa
Sensors 2024, 24(6), 1990; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24061990 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 586
Abstract
We have investigated a polarization property of the (specularly) reflected light from an aluminum grating, coated with a palladium (Pd) thin-film on its surface. The polarization property, which is associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and occurs in the Pd thin-film on the [...] Read more.
We have investigated a polarization property of the (specularly) reflected light from an aluminum grating, coated with a palladium (Pd) thin-film on its surface. The polarization property, which is associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and occurs in the Pd thin-film on the aluminum grating in a conical mounting, is observed as a rapid change in the normalized Stokes parameter s3, around the resonance angle, θsp, at which point, SPR occurs. The sensing technique used the rapid change in s3 to allow us to successfully detect a small change in the complex refractive index of the Pd thin-film layer upon exposure to hydrogen gas, with a concentration near the lower explosion level. Experimental results showed that the sensing technique provided a sensitive and stable response when the Pd thin-film layer was exposed to gas mixtures containing hydrogen at concentrations of 1 to 4% (by volume) in nitrogen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Gas Sensing and Applications)
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10 pages, 2778 KiB  
Communication
Laser Velocimetry for the In Situ Sensing of Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Flow Velocity
by Jingjing Sun, Lei Zhang, Guojie Tu, Shenglai Zhen, Zhigang Cao, Guosheng Zhang and Benli Yu
Sensors 2023, 23(20), 8411; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23208411 - 12 Oct 2023
Viewed by 786
Abstract
Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) based on a differential laser Doppler system has been widely used in fluid mechanics to measure particle velocity. However, the two outgoing lights must intersect strictly at the measurement position. In cross-interface applications, due to interface effects, two beams [...] Read more.
Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) based on a differential laser Doppler system has been widely used in fluid mechanics to measure particle velocity. However, the two outgoing lights must intersect strictly at the measurement position. In cross-interface applications, due to interface effects, two beams of light become easily disjointed. To address the issue, we present a laser velocimeter in a coaxial arrangement consisting of the following components: a single-frequency laser (wavelength λ = 532 nm) and a Twyman–Green interferometer. In contrast to previous LDV systems, a laser velocimeter based on the Twyman–Green interferometer has the advantage of realizing cross-interface measurement. At the same time, the sensitive direction of the instrument can be changed according to the direction of the measured speed. We have developed a 4000 m level laser hydrothermal flow velocity measurement prototype suitable for deep-sea in situ measurement. The system underwent a withstand voltage test at the Qingdao Deep Sea Base, and the signal obtained was normal under a high pressure of 40 MPa. The velocity contrast measurement was carried out at the China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research. The maximum relative error of the measurement was 8.82% when compared with the acoustic Doppler velocimeter at the low-speed range of 0.1–1 m/s. The maximum relative error of the measurement was 1.98% when compared with the nozzle standard velocity system at the high-speed range of 1–7 m/s. Finally, the prototype system was successfully evaluated in the shallow sea in Lingshui, Hainan, with it demonstrating great potential for the in situ measurement of fluid velocity at marine hydrothermal vents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Gas Sensing and Applications)
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